Academic Libraries

Is Academic Publishing Finally At A Crossroads?

Is Academic Publishing Finally At A Crossroads?
So, where does that leave us? Libraries are grumbling, funders are disquieted, and individual faculty members are happy to sign petitions of protest. But none of this addresses what I see as the key issue: faculty give these journals this much power because they rest entire careers on them. You get tenure based on your academic publications. You submit your publications list when you apply for grants and funding. Look at any academic C.V. and you'll see that it's structured so that the big name journals in which the person has published are listed promptly. It's one of the first things that gets looked at when someone applies for an academic job.

Harvard: Nearly $3.75 Million on Academic Journal Bundles Is TOO MUCH

A Harvard faculty committee says that the situation is "untenable" and asks faculty members to publish in open-access publications.

"What we see here is pure rentier capitalism: monopolising a public resource then charging exorbitant fees to use it. Another term for it is economic parasitism. To obtain the knowledge for which we have already paid, we must surrender our feu to the lairds of learning."

Academic publishing doesn't add up

Academic publishing doesn't add up
The world of university research has long been held to ransom by academic publishers charging exorbitant prices for subscriptions – but that may all be about to end

Craigslist thread reveals subculture of sexual activity in UNC's Davis Library

Craigslist thread reveals subculture of sexual activity in UNC's Davis Library
“Out of curiosity one day, we were all in the library because, you know, there’s all kinds of weird shenanigans. We decided to look in personals and there it was,” said Davis Library employee and student Matthiew Morel, referring to the Craigslist posts.

Morel said he has only seen evidence on the seventh and eighth floors.

“The higher you go up, the more likely you are to encounter it,” Morel said.

A tale of two libraries and a revolution

A tale of two libraries and a revolution
This is a tale of two libraries and how they’re being transformed. One of them is our own Firestone: the Gothic hull with its distinctive interior decorative scheme, half “Mad Men,” half World War II submarine; its carrels where seniors used to confine themselves like the hermits of the ancient Syrian desert; and its lower floors, the caverns measureless to man, where a German friend, looking a little desperate, said to me,“Tony, this library is not user-friendly,” and disappeared down dark rows of books, never to be seen again (I think he may still be down there).

A Promise by Harvard's Librarian

From Publishers Weekly: Scholar and Harvard University librarian Robert Darnton vowed that the Digital Public Library of America, a nonprofit, nationwide effort to digitize and offer access to millions of free, digitized books and special collections would launch by April of 2013. “I make this promise to you,” Darnton said at the close of his talk, entitled “Digitize, Democratize: Libraries and the Future of Books": “We will get this done.” -- Read More

The future of academic libraries: An video interview with Steven J Bell

The future of academic libraries: An interview with Steven J Bell
Steven thinks new learning initiatives like MITx and Udacity’s massive open online courses are an opportunity for academic libraries to serve non-traditional, potentially unaffiliated students, who he refers to as higher education’s new majority learners. In a recent article from his From the Bell Tower Library Journal column he suggested two possible scenarios for academic libraries within this emerging unbundled higher education landscape.

The Student Research Pad

The Student Research Pad
What if colleges were to set up a combination note-taking, bookmarking, citation management web service for every incoming student? The tool could be all set up and ready to go, accessible on the web to the student by means of the same authentication/login system they use to get to campus email, course management systems, remote access to library databases, etc. The “research pad” that I have been brainstorming off and on for the past few years would connect to lots of resources and tools automatically and would allow the easy manual import of new items (articles found in a database, for example) via a number of means (bookmarklets, import via a custom email address, RSS feeds from your Zotero account, etc.)

Are You a Press or Are You a Library? An Interview with NYU’s Monica McCormick

Are You a Press or Are You a Library? An Interview with NYU’s Monica McCormick
This interview covers one example of the ways in which a university library and press are learning to negotiate this new publishing ecosystem together. I spoke with Monica McCormick (@moncia), who holds the interesting and unusual position of simultaneously working with both the NYU Press and the NYU Library in her position in the Office of Digital Scholarly Publishing. In our conversation, we covered issues ranging from the relationship between the Press and the Library at NYU, her position on open access, and the important and undervalued work that editors continue to play in academia.

Former librarian charged with child exploitation

Former librarian charged with child exploitation

A former librarian is in custody for allegedly having child pornography in his office, authorities said.
The charges come after officials at Reinhardt University, where he worked as a librarian, reported that they found child pornographic images in his office.

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