Academic Libraries

Data Preservation in the Digital Age

David Fiander writes \"The folks over at slashdot are getting all excited about a a story about a new paper out of UMich that talks about the problems of data preservation in the digital age. As if it\'s a new problem, and not just a seriously exacerbated one \"

From Slashdot\"Recently there was an Ask Slashdot about the the problem of preserving digital material. The basic idea was that we are creating a massive wealth of digital information, but have no clear plan for preserving it. What happens to all of those poems I write when I try to access them for my grandkids? What about the pictures of my kids I took with that digital camera? Can I still get to them in time to embarrass them in the future?

Old computers threat to records

The BBC has a story on how computers will start to decompose with important records.


Vital archaeological records could be
lost forever because the computers
they are stored on become quickly
obsolete.

The physical site is nearly always
completely destroyed during a dig,
but archaeologists claim the
knowledge they glean from the
ground is then available for posterity.\"The irony is that archaeological
information held in magnetic format
is decaying faster than it ever did in
the ground,\" warns William Kilbride of
the Archaeology Data Service (ADS)
at the University of York. -- Read More

Black students win CU appeal

A Follow up Story from the Denver Post.

A student group can have its Black History Month display.

Harold Bruff, dean of the University of Colorado law school, on Tuesday asked the law librarian to relent and allow the Black American Law Students Association to exhibit its take on the legal system\'s treatment of blacks throughout history.

The controversy started last week, after Barbara Bintliff, head of the law school library, asked to review the contents of the students\' display. According to Haygood, Bintliff rejected much of that content.

Bintliff has not responded to requests for comment.

\"We feel pretty good,\" said Ryan Haygood, president of the group. \"The students are really excited to see that we didn\'t have to settle for being treated - we felt - unfavorably.\" -- Read More

Archivists grapple with digital pace

Boston.com has an exciting archivist
Story on the troubles facing todays archivists.

Actually, the biggest problem is one scholars and archivists already confront. It\'s not an excess of access but the reverse. For the wonderful world of digitized information and on line everything has a dark archival underbelly: The more sophisticated information technology becomes, and the more readily accessible in the present, the harder it is to preserve and the less accessible it becomes in the future.

Stanford Project to Test Method for Preserving Dig

Infodude writes \"To assuage fears about the permanence of articles published in electronic journals, Stanford University researchers will test a computerized variation on an age-old archiving strategy: Make lots of copies, and keep them in different locations.

http://www.chronicle.com/free/2000/02/2000021001t.htm \"

Water flood BYU Library

news.excite.com has a Story on flooing at the Bringham Young University in UT.

\"Thousands of Brigham Young University students and library employees were startled in the Harold B. Lee Library when they heard: \"Please gather your belongings and immediately evacuate the building in an orderly fashion\" around 12:15 p.m. on Thursday.\" -- Read More

Related article on Transylvania rare books theft

Catherine Lavallée-Welch writes "Article on rare books thefts in libraries, following the event at Transylvania University. Snitch.com Has The Story"

Florida College Students Concerned about Library Hours

Anonymous Patron writes "students at the University of South Florida are not happy with the very reduced hours at the university's library. More here from The Oracle."

Jazz Discovery at Library of Congress

gsandler writes "

Here is a
story from the New York Times on the discovery by the Library of Congress of a
previously unknown recording of the Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane.
There are very few recordings of this period of John Coltrane's career. "During this period, Coltrane fully collected himself as an improviser, challenged by Monk and the discipline of his unusual harmonic sense. Thus began the 10-year sprint during which he changed jazz completely, before his death in 1967."
(Registration at the NY Times web site is required.)

"

Too soon to let computers replace university libraries

Anonymous Patron writes "The Japan Times Online has one that looks at The University of Texas (UT) at Austin's decision to remove almost all the books from its undergraduate library to provide space for a digital learning center, where students can use computers to access a wide variety of information. University officials are proud to be leading a trend.
It is good to see academia catching up with technology. But what are the repercussions of this shift? I am thinking about this from various perspectives: Teacher, researcher, author and reader.

Note from RH: The article mistakenly identifies the library as being in Houston. It's at the UT-Austin."

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