Academic Libraries

Library to halt sale of historic journals

Charles Davis writes \"The British Library has suspended sales of historic newspapers after a public outcry.
It had disposed of up to 60,000 bound volumes of newspapers in
unpublicised deals in the past four years. All the newspapers were foreign.
The library said it had not broken its legal obligation to collect and maintain
British printed material.
The library, caught out by the controversy, said yesterday that it would make
no further disposals until it had undertaken \"a complete review of microfilm copies\". The recent disposals include long runs of newspapers from most
European countries, the United States, Latin America and pre-revolutionary
Russia.
Story from \"Daily Telegraph\" 24 November 2000
http://www.telegraph.co.uk -- Read More

Rare Book Library Rarely Used!!

The University of Pennsylvania Libraries just got their 5 millionth volume, a rare hagadah. Unfortunately, their rare book collection is underutilized by the student body. What is so special about a rare book collection if nobody uses it. Excite has the story.\"Like the rest of Penn\'s unusual or uncommon 250,000 printed books, over 10,000 linear feet of manuscript collections, and more than 1,500 codex manuscripts -- many one-of-a-kind maps, broadsides, playbills, programs, photographs, prints, drawings and sound recordings -- are housed in the collection. And in about 10 minutes, you or any other Penn student can sit down, request and read from the same copy of Paradise Lost that Milton once held in his own hands or browse through its recently acquired hagadah.\" -- Read More

Can a library oversee a Museum?

Someone writes \"Can a library system oversee a \'Contemporary Art\' museum? It looks like the University of Arizona is trying to figure this out:


The Wildcat from the U of Arizona has a
Story on by a decison to keep The Center for Creative Photography under contol of university libraries.

Some say that its function as a museum would best be served if \"liberated from control of the university library system\".

I like that term \"liberated\", like it\'s being held hostage.

For Profit Library?

Questia Media is hoping to entice students to pay as much as
$360 a year for online access to searchable books and
journals. The Chronicle
has the Full
Story
. Questia
says it will have more than 50,000 scholarly books and
journals by January, then they\'ll sell subscriptions for $20
or $30 a month, it allows the students to copy and \"paste\"
much easier.

....the service\'s search-and-copy features
respond to the way students really do their papers. \"They\'re
not reading the books,\" says Troy Williams. -- Read More

Law library quiet -- for now

Rochester is just down the road from LISNews headquarters, so I thought I\'d post Post This Story on a sad little law library that no one seems to like, yet.


3 months ago The Monroe County Hall opened a law libary and it just doesn\'t get the traffic they had hoped for. There are only actually 15 or so people a day. Don\'t you wish you\'re library was like that sometimes?

Save the front page

Alert reader Charles Davis suggested This Story from Telegraph.co.uk.

When the British Library decided to get rid of a historic archive of American newspapers Nicholson Baker was bought it for himself. Now he wants to save \'the raw store of history\' that microfilm and the internet are wiping out. He is also the one who sued the San Francisco Public Library under the Freedom of Information act to release details of its \"hate crime against the past\" a few years ago when they went on the book dumping binge.

\"Say your grandparents had a wedding picture in this paper: what difference would it make to you if you saw the actual paper, instead of printing it off microfilm? The first would link you directly to that past event - it\'s difficult to explain why that would be true, but it is. The past exerts a stronger pull, it becomes realer, more understandable somehow when you have the actual document and not a copy.\"

New SACS Accreditation Criteria

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) has released a proposed new set of standards for accreditation for colleges in their region. The proposed standards are alarmingly weak concerning libraries, where the previous standards were quite good and expected a high level of professionalism in library services. Academic librarians in the region are up in arms, trying to get the proposed standards changed. They may turn out to be successful, and they may not. It is a scary reminder that the place of librarianship and libraries is anything but secure, regardless of how you conceive of libraries and library service. The latest Library Juice has an article from TEXLINE, a newsletter of the Texas Library Association, on the issue, with links to relevant SACS documents, followed by some discussion from COLLIB-L, the listserv of the ACRL college libraries section, which give some insight into what is happening and what can be done about it.

National Archives Week

I don\'t know how I missed it, but this is National Archives Week!

Archives Week is an annual, weeklong observance of the importance of archival and historical records to our lives.

Just so you don\'t miss it in the coming years:


ARCHIVES WEEK DATES, 2000-2003

October 8-15, 2000
October 7-14, 2001
October 6-13, 2002
October 5-12, 2003


Give your favorite archivist a Big Kiss!


National Archives and Records Administration

Challenges face Library of Congress

Philly.com has
a short but sweet interview with curator Harry Katz at LOC on the troubles with preservation these days.

\"As society becomes more digitalized, the library is increasingly looking at computer capacity as much as warehouse space in planning its future needs. \"One problem is the hardware,\" Katz said. \"Technology moves so fast that in a few years today\'s computers may be obsolete. No use keeping the disks if they can\'t be read. How much equipment do we have to preserve, too?\"\"


Interesting point I never considered, now they must save computers in order to read the disks in the future.

The Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

The
Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

is a look back at how things were a couple hundred years ago
at The Smithsonian. It\'s full of cool old photos and info
for all you history buffs.

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