Academic Libraries

Archivists make technology work for them

CS Monitor.com has a Story on how archivists are using technology to over come all the problems other technologies cause.

\"You\'re going to have to have a technology room off of all these repositories so you can have MS-DOS, Java, HTML,\" Mr. Neff says. \"We don\'t know which [program] is going to go the way of the 8-track.\"

Maine special collections in the news

Deb Rollins writes \"

\"Digging Through Maine\'s Closet\", starting with Edna St. Vincent Millay\'s nightgown! Focuses on some special collections in southern Maine, from the Maine Times weekly newspaper... \"


They cover Collections of historic records and other materials all over the great state of Maine.

LC expropriates CPUSA Docs

The Library of Congress has recovered a large number of documents of the Communist Party of the United States which were taken to the Soviet Union for safe-keeping during the Cold War. The problem is, they didn\'t consult the still-existing Communist Party about the colletion of documents. The CP, naturally, is interested in gaining access to its own documents and would like to keep them in its own archive. They weren\'t even consulted about the creation of the access tool for the documents. Mark Rosenzweig, who is the librarian at the Reference Center for Marxist Studies, has written an open letter to the LC about the issue. It can be found in the latest issue of Library Juice, along with some discussion and LC\'s original press release.

Bodleian collects prize for revamp.

Charles Davis writes \"The meticulous conservation of Oxford\'s Bodleian Library has earned an award from the
Pan-European Federation for Heritage, Europa Nostra.
Oxford University\'s main research library is one of
two English institutions to win a diploma at a
conference in The Hague, The Netherlands. Built in 1602, the Bodleian is one of the oldest libraries in Europe
See
thisisoxfordshire for the story
\"

Hail (of) Clintonia

Brian sent in
This Story
From Computerworld.

EX-President Clinton will be
spending a lot of his time on his presidential library. IT
systems that will make it nearly impossible to fully
catalog his administration. They have 40 million e-mail
messages alone, a mere 15% of the library has been
indexed after 12 years.

\"

Dred Scott documents available on Internet

State officials formally announced the Web site on Monday, Martin Luther King Day, so I\'m a little behind on this one.

The Missouri State Archives worked with St. Louis Circuit Court and Washington University to put 170 pages of the original Scott documents online.

\"In 1846, Dred Scott and his wife Harriet filed suit for their freedom in the St. Louis Circuit Court. This suit began an eleven-year legal fight that ended in the U.S. Supreme Court, which issued a landmark decision declaring that Scott remain a slave. This decision contributed to rising tensions between the free and slave states just before the American Civil War.

The records displayed in this exhibit document the Scotts\' early struggle to gain their freedom through litigation and are the only extant records of this significant case as it was heard in the St. Louis Circuit Court.
\"

Google of Archives Stories

Library of Congress has 5 million U.S. history items online. The 5 million images belong to a project called \"American Memory,\" available at loc.gov.


Meanwhile, USC has nearly $2 million worth of Ernest Hemingway\'s letters. Now the USC where students and researchers can study how authors develop their ideas and their works. \"I\'m still giddy about it,\" professor Matthew Bruccoli said. Denver Post Story


Also, More than 150 copies of the complete legal papers of Abraham Lincoln will soon be going out to law schools across the country, thanks to a grant received recently by The Lincoln Legal Papers research project. Full Story.

Thanks to Bob Cox for most of these.

Changing roles for university libraries

InsideDenver has a nice Story on college libraries, and how well they are doing. They touch on Questia Media, and the internet\'s impact on libraries.


\"It\'s not providing the information. It\'s providing the service to help people find the right stuff,\"

Term-paper citations of Internet sources no longer exist

Bob Cox sent in this press release from Cornell on a study by Cornell University librarians shows that many URLs, cited in student term-paper bibliographies often are incorrect or refer to documents that no longer exist. I\'m sure it\'s just a coincidence! Why would a student make up a URL?

They suggest that professors set guidelines for acceptable citations in course assignments. Also, they believe that collegiate libraries should create and maintain scholarly portals for authoritative web sites with a commitment to long-term access and instruct students on how to critically evaluate resources. -- Read More

Information Services for Higher Ed.: A New Competitive Space

Carol Ann Hughes, the head of collections at Questia.com, has a new article out in Dlib called Information Services for Higher Education
A New Competitive Space
. She writes, \"Any organization that undertakes an educational mission in our society is now and will increasingly be surrounded by alternative information service suppliers ... it is likely that ... alternatives will come from the for-profit sector.\"

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