Academic Libraries

Questia Gets Big Time Publicity

Steven Bell writes: \"Take a look at the April 30, 2001 issue of Time magazine. On page Y17 (special bonus section \"YOUR BUSINESS\") has a story titled \"You\'ve Got Books\" E-libraries Want to Reinvent Term Papers.\" Questia and its plan to offer an electronic alternative to libraries is the main subject of the story, though e-brary and NetLibrary are mentioned. The story makes Questia sound like the greatest invention since sliced white bread. I find it annoying that the story completely overlooks the amazing strides academic libraries are making in creating digital libraries, and no academic library leaders were interviewed for the story. However, some might say the story is just a fluff piece to put the spotlight on one more dot-com enterprise. Still, my letter to editor is on its way. \"

Mr. Gates\' Xanadu

Ryan writes: \"Interesting article from front page of (the early edition, the one I bought at the subway station on Saturday afternoon) Sunday\'s New York Times on the burying of the Bettmann photo archives in Pennsylvania for the remote/merely-theoretical(?) enjoyment of the generations to come. Raises the question of archives for archives\' sake, why have \'em if we can\'t use \'em, private property vs. public\'s claim on cultural legacy. I didn\'t know much about the state of the Bettmann archives before I read this--

Full NY Times Story \"

Free Speech Movement Archives

Good Ol\' slashdot pointed me to This
article
from the San Francisco
Chronicle
on The remains of the fabled 1960\'s
Free Speech Movement.
They have 35,000 pages online now. They say
the text has been entered by hand by workers in India.

Check out the
FSM-A Site to
see what you missed in the 60\'s.

This weekend was also the FSM Symposium at UC Berkeley.

More Questia Discussion

This week Library Juice published a discussion thread on Questia from COLLIB-L, the second in a series. The first one was published last December. Last July, Library Juice published an editorial called Questioning Questia. At issue is the company\'s decision to bypass libraries and offer access to their digitized collection of 50,000 books directly to students, for a fee.

Microfilm or Paper?

A couple more reviews of \"Libraries and the Assault on Paper\" By Nicholson Baker, I may have to read this one after all.
Mark sent along
This NY Times Review and you can find another at NYBooks.com.

If you haven\'t heard, Baker says primary sources should be preserved and that the trashing them is a crime.

\"I\'ve tried not to misrepresent those whose views differ from my own, but I make no secret of my disagreement; at times, a dormant prosecutorial urge awoke in me, for we have lost things that we can never get back.\"

Digitizing Archives Not So Easy

Millions of books in the Library of Congress have deteriorated to the point where they can\'t be lent to users without risking irreparable damage.

Centuries-old print newspaper archives have been replaced by blurry reels of outdated microfilm degraded from years of overuse and time worn chemicals. [more...] from Wired News.

Is U.S. History Becoming History?

The workings of government in the first decades of the information era have been poorly recorded, archiving experts say. Years of valuable public records may have already been lost, creating a gap in the country\'s historical record.

Archivists, government watchdog groups and investigative reporters worry that unless the problem is solved, the lack of information could make it more difficult to hold government officials accountable for their decisions and policies. [more...] from Wired News.

Libraries and the Assault on Paper

Two stories on \"Doublefold: Libraries and the Assault
on Paper\", a book that has some harsh words for some
library practices. The NY Times Story includes words from
James Billington, the librarian of Congress.


The
SunTimes
also has a Book Review and further
comments on the book.

Care of AV Materials For Broadcasting

Here\'s An Article I found on a part of librarianship
I\'m not sure I even knew exsisted.

They say content preservation is the main problem in
the management of audio-visual archives, and present
various options for taking care of your archives. Lots of
nice fancy charts and graphs in this one.

Medici Family Library and Archives

Lee Hadden Writes:
\"Today on Morning Edition from National Public Radio was an account of
the Medici Family Library and Archives, and their work to catalog this
unique and enormous collection of Italian history.\"

The archive is a collection of virtually
every letter sent or received by the Medici court and covers alot of Italian art and European history. They Hope to have the project complete by 2012, it takes up over a Kilometer of shelf space!

The
Medici Archive Project has a website: medici.org

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