Academic Libraries

What’s Important?

AbcNews is running an Interesting Story on issues facing the preservation sector.
They managed to avoid Baker in this one somehow.

\"In 20 years, we will try to find first editions of their works, and we will look for their papers on the market,\" she says. \"If they have stuff on disk, and we collect their disks, that means we have to have technology to be able to read their disks. … We\'re still buying Mark Twain letters. We haven\'t really grappled with somebody from the [19]90s yet.\"

When In-House Research Isn\'t Enough

HBSWK has a Story on corporate research and development and how much it is changing.

There\'s a new paradigm to consider that takes into account both internal and external research and development efforts to create what they call a \"company innovation system.\"

Project to digitize early English texts

A number of academic libraries, in partnership with ProQuest, are working on a fully-searchable database containing 25,000 early English texts. The full story from The Chronicle of Higher Education.
\"The unusual project -- making business partners out of parties that are sometimes at odds with each other over pricing and access issues -- could eventually be a model for future collaborations between libraries and other content companies.\"

3 Million Pounds of History

A great profile in the New York Times of the trials, travails, and impressive holdings of the Municipal Archives of the City of New York.

The collection — three million pounds of material, ranging from the original 1654 Dutch sales slip for the purchase of Coney Island, to a trove of stereoscopic Victorian pornography assembled by an antivice crusader — has weathered centuries of profound neglect. It has been appallingly lodged in a succession of makeshift spaces, including a city pier and the attic of a fire-prone pizza parlor. . .an improbable thing has happened as archivists have made these records available to scholars in recent years: New York City\'s history has been rewritten.

Prison Cuts Library Budget - Inmates Learn to Do Things the Old-Fashioned Way

Rich Tucker writes...

State corrections officials are removing typewriters and word processors from prison law libraries, making it necessary for Florida inmates without attorneys to produce their legal briefs the really old-fashioned way. [more...] from The Florida Times Union.

From Persia to Brooklyn

The New York Times review of the exhibit \"Precious Possessions: Treasures from the Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary.\"

The library [houses] 375,000 volumes, including the largest collection of Hebraica and Judaica in the Western Hemisphere. . . they date from the 11th to the 20th century and come from all over the map: Persia, Italy, Egypt, Brooklyn. Almost every item has a story to tell or a name to drop. Want to see Maimonides\'s signature? Sigmund Freud\'s bookplate? A score written by Leonard Bernstein? They\'re here. And, of course, fragility is part of their allure: books and manuscripts are sensitive to light, which means they should not be on view for long.

Corporate Cash & Campus Labs

The Christian Science Monitor has a story on ever growing university-corporate partnerships. There is no doubt corporate cash is undermining the credibility of research results.

They say the long-term risk ia a loss of public confidence that could permanently undermine support for universities.

I say it\'s something far worse.

Special Library Closes

This Story From The New York Times was recommeded by Kerry and Stephen.

AOL Time Warner closed Time Inc.\'s editorial research library, described as \"a huge collection of volumes and archived clippings that occupies a floor and a half at the Time-Life Building, plus extensive warehouse space — employed three dozen librarians and staff.\"

\"Peter Costiglio, a spokesman for Time Inc., said that closing the library should be seen not as dissolution but as an act of decentralization.\"

Hurray, a new word for FIRED!

An Easy \'A\'

The Houston Chronicle has This Story that seems to unfairly lump Questia in with paper mills and other ways students use the web to cheat. No doubt the internet is a cheaters paradise, but is Questia (or any of the other e-Libraries) making it easy to cheat?

\"Professors are really anchored in the book and printed culture, But the students aren\'t.\"

Questia Gets Big Time Publicity

Steven Bell writes: \"Take a look at the April 30, 2001 issue of Time magazine. On page Y17 (special bonus section \"YOUR BUSINESS\") has a story titled \"You\'ve Got Books\" E-libraries Want to Reinvent Term Papers.\" Questia and its plan to offer an electronic alternative to libraries is the main subject of the story, though e-brary and NetLibrary are mentioned. The story makes Questia sound like the greatest invention since sliced white bread. I find it annoying that the story completely overlooks the amazing strides academic libraries are making in creating digital libraries, and no academic library leaders were interviewed for the story. However, some might say the story is just a fluff piece to put the spotlight on one more dot-com enterprise. Still, my letter to editor is on its way. \"

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