Academic Libraries

Help build a Web Archive of the Sept 11 Attack

webArchivist.org is working with The Internet Archive in collaboration with the Library of Congress to identify and archive pages and sites related to the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington on September 11, 2001. They want to be sure that there is a solid historical record of this time.


They are asking for volunteers to help them identify any web sites or pages that have information or content about the Sep11 Attack. They are especially interested in finding sites by individuals -- that record their feelings, experiences or opinions. They are also especially interested in finding non-American sites.

Go to:
webArchivist.org for all the details.

Speaking Volumes

Kevin Kipp from the St. Louis Commerce Magazine writes about the state of academic libraries in Missouri and how technology has improved services.
\"The world of libraries has changed because of technology,” says Karen Luebbert, vice president and executive assistant to the president at Webster University. “The key now is access rather than possession.\"
There is also a synopsis of Missouri\'s academic libraries showing volumes, budget and technology. Full Story

Archiving the Past, but Embracing the Future

From the New York Times, a biography/informational article about Rodney Phillips, the director of the Humanities and Social Services Library at NYPL.

JOHN KIFNER writes: \"This is an amazing edifice, built to honor education and culture,\" Mr. Phillips said. \"I was so lucky to get that job out of library school.\"

Full Story

When is a Use a Fair Use? University Liability for Educational Copying

One of the many interesting articles that have appeared in the new journal portal: Libraries and the Academy:

Ideally, advances in information technology could be used to improve access to information resources and promote the discovery of new knowledge, to improve educational opportunities, or simply to enhance the free flow of information essential to an informed citizenry. But in the new economy, these salutary outcomes are often forced to take a back seat to the proprietary interests of an steadily shrinking handful of multinational corporations whose overriding interest, unfortunately for public policy, is the extraction of profit from information resources.
A striking example concerns the distribution of educational reading materials in the higher education environment . . .

More. The article appears only to be accessible if your institution has paid for access to Project Muse.

Bush Delays Release of Reagan Records Again

The Associated Press reports:

For the third time, the Bush administration has delayed release of 68,000 pages of Ronald Reagan\'s White House records, including vice presidential papers from President Bush\'s father. The papers were to have come out in January, 12 years after Reagan left office as provided under law. The White House delayed the release to June 21, then to the last day in August.

On Friday, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales sought a third extension, this time with no deadline, so the administration can review the records and consult representatives of former presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton . . . ``I think it\'s a scandal to hold them back,\'\' Anna Nelson, a historian at American University, said Friday. ``I think the whole point of the Presidential Records Act is to open documents. It goes against the spirit of the law.\'\'

More via the New York Times.

Virginia Weighs Money For Special Collections Library

Although acknowledging it as a high priority, Governor James Gilmore has not decided whether the state will fund the construction of a new special collections library for the University of Virginia:

Money for the special collections library was among $275 million in state funding for capital projects not already under contract -- mainly college construction projects -- that Gilmore froze this year to balance the state budget and keep the car-tax rollback on schedule . . . [ More from the Washington Post .]

The University of Virginia Special Collections Department holds 300,000 rare books and 12 million+ manuscripts, including the only known complete manuscript of Whitman\'s Leaves of Grass.

Archival entrepreneur gains leadership honor

Someone writes \"Wayne State University recognizes librarian/archivist by naming her recipient of Emerging Corporate Leadership Award. Article also discusses archival services conducted by her company, which are somewhat unique to the archival world.

Also, a rather non-traditional article for you to include. Most of your material cited relate to \"mainstream\" librarianship. This services as just another reminder of how versatile librarians/archivists can be.


Full Story from Detroit News \"

Here Comes The Competition

The ever helpful Bob Cox sent along This Story from universitybusiness.com on new for-profit digital libraries.

They start by saying \"IF THERE IS ONE INSTITUTION on a college campus that has never faced outside competition, it is the library.\"

Now any number of a half-dozen companies would like to undermine the library\'s monopoly. They cover all the usual suspects, Questia, ebrary, netLibrary, XanEdu, and Jones.

FDR Presidential Library

Anne Gometz writes \"This two part article in NARA\'s Prologue magazine recounts the history of the first Presidential Library including why it is called a \"library\" rather than an archives. \"


Until Roosevelt, Presidents leaving office routinely took their papers with them. George Washington set the precedent in 1797 when he took his files home with him to Mount Vernon, with the hope—never fulfilled—of building a library to house them.

Harvard Libraries Acquire Important Longfellow Collection

A nice piece on the acquisition by Harvard\'s Houghton Library of the collection of Boston bibliophile and Longfellow fanatic Victor Gulotta:

Victor Gulotta\'s collection once filled his upstairs library. It included first-edition books, manuscripts, letters, photographs, and other objects associated with American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) - about 1,000 items, amassed over 14 years. Possibly the largest Longfellow collection in private hands, it spilled into Gulotta\'s hallway, where parts of it adorned the walls above the stairs. . .

More from today\'s Boston Globe.

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