Academic Libraries

Can LOC Preserve its 35 terabytes?

Luis Acosta writes \"Short article in MIT\'s Technology Review on the Library of Congress\'s effort to figure out how to preserve digital information:\"


Congress recently gave the library $100 million to figure out what to do with all that stuff.

\"With that money we\'ll be able to gather the technical people and the archivists and start to develop a prototype,\"

USC Library Reopens After \"Seismic Retrofitting\"

The University of Southern California\'s Edward L. Doheny Memorial Library has been outfitted to withstand earthquakes:

The 650,000-volume library, a focus of research in the humanities and social sciences, has been a striking example of Italian Romanesque architecture on the campus since it opened in 1932 . . .

The library was damaged like so many other Los Angeles buildings in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. USC used funds granted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cover most of the costs of building 17 shear walls to strengthen the structure against lateral movement from earthquakes.

More from the Los Angeles Times.

Ethiopian University Plans to Expand Library Facilities

The Institute of Ethiopian Studies at Addis Ababa University has begun a fundraising campaign to finance the construction of a badly needed new library:

The Institute of Ethiopian Studies on Monday September 24, 2001 held a pre-launch of a fund raising campaign to build a new library that is estimated to cost USD 5 million. The open house held by the IES on Monday attracted over 250 guests, who were entertained by Ethiopian singers, musicians, and dancers . . .

President of Addis Ababa University, Prof. Eshetu Woncheko, emphasized the importance of the IES, which has the largest collection of Ethiopian artefacts in the world, and the need to provide a new library. The library is currently in Ras Makonnen Hall, a palace donated by Emperor Haile Selassie to the university. The hall was not designed to display or hold the weight of the growing IES collection of manuscripts, books and periodicals.

More from allAfrica.com. More details on AAU library collections can be found at the IES library homepage.

Letter by Letter

The Great Bob Cox sent along This One from U Of Chicago Mag on the University Library\'s Special Collections.

They have a $125,000 grant from the Save America\'s Treasures Program, and librarians have begun going through the collection piece by piece, putting it into order and preparing it for microfilming. By next June they plan to have the entire collection on film. The oldest paper-like documents in Regenstein are fragments of flattened papyrus from the second century a.d.

No word on plans to put the collection online.

Volunteers Nationwide Join to Create/Preserve Web Archives on Terrorist Attacks

A large number of volunteers nationwide are joining the Library of Congress and an Internet archive to collect and preserve online information from around the globe about the attack on America. more... from The Washington Post.

The changing role of law librarians

The Pittsburg Business Times has a Nice Look at how the law librarian field has changed.

It seems like most of what they say carries over nicely to all areas of librarianship.

\"Computers can do a lot for us, but they can\'t think like we do. There is a certain serendipity when a person sits down with a legal book,\'\' said John DiGilio, a legal and business research librarian at the Downtown law firm of Kirkpatrick & Lockhart L.L.P.\"

A Virtual Walk Through Tin Pan Alley

The Chronicle of Higher Ed is reporting on a cool new Online Archive at Mississippi State University\'s Templeton Sheet Music Collection.
The university\'s library is digitizing and conserving the collection, an archive of about 22,000 pieces of ragtime, blues, show-tune, and war-song folios from the 1890s to the Great Depression.

Bay County\'s Sage Branch Library seems to be taking the opposite approach, selling off volumes from the original collection of the library from 1884.

Be Not Proud In This Library

Here\'s and interesting one from News-Press
on a sticky situation at Florida Gulf Coast University.

The head librarian (Director?) asked some employees
to remove “Proud to be an American” stickers this
week, saying she didn’t want to offend international
students.

“My concern was that if a student comes to the
desk and sees the slogan, it might make it
uncomfortable, I think we have an
obligation to think about how we present ourselves. We
want to ensure civility and tolerance.”

Update[Thurs 10:15am] She Said Sorry after the school president rescinded her directive.

Book Worms Feasting on Historic Collections at British Library Cause for Concern

The problem of insects and parasites gorging themselves on rare manuscripts and historical texts is such a problem in the UK that the British Library has decided to organize a conference on the issue in order to find a solution. more... from The Times.

Archives of History of American Psychology Provide Insight Into Terrorist Mind

Anyone who\'s studied psychology is familar with the shock boxes of the mid 1900s. A volunteer, sitting on one side of the curtain, despite written warnings, would flip a switch emmitting a direct, high voltage jolt to someone on the other side, as indicated by agonizing screams. It was fake, but the person pushing the button didn\'t know that. From the Holocaust to modern day terrorism, the Archives of the History of American Psychology, in Akron, Ohio, according to director David Baker, \"is bigger and more important than any general psychology archive in the world. Imagine studying the history of art without museums and galleries, or of literature without libraries and bookstores. That\'s what it was like to study psychology before the archives opened in 1965.\" more... from The Plain Dealer.

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