Academic Libraries

Historical \"ephemeral films\" archive - free .avi downloads.

Archive.org/movies
This site is just plain cool, it\'s a quirky historical archive of 
short, old movies and films (ads, educational, propaganda films, and others)
available in two different formats: .mpg (mpeg-2) and DivX
.avi\'s (mpeg-4).

From Archive.org\'s description:
\"This collection contains movies that the Prelinger
Archives
has digitized (about 956 now online) and donated to the Internet
Archive. The films focus mainly on everyday life, culture, industry, and
institutions in North America in the 20th century.\"

Browse through the looong title
list
or read \"About
This Collection
\". I especially enjoyed the article
by Bart Eisenberg where
the archivist, Rick Prelinger, \"calls himself a \"media archaeologist.\"

LISNews searches: movie
-|- film
-|- Archive.org.

-Hermit ;-)

Library of Congress adds \'Jaws,\' \'Apes\' & \'Animal House\' to Film Registry

Librarian of Congress James Billington has selected 25 films to be added to the National Film Registry. \"Each year Billington chooses 25 that are culturally, historically or aesthetically significant for inclusion in the Registry. For each title named to the Registry, the Library of Congress works to ensure that the film is preserved for all time.\" According to Billington, \"Our film heritage is America\'s living past. It celebrates the creativity and inventiveness of diverse communities and our nation as a whole. By preserving American films, we safeguard our history and build toward the future.\" Click below for the list of this year\'s movie titles. -- Read More

Live Tarantula Found in the Stacks at ISU

Imagine going into the stacks and discovering a tarantula. It happened at the Indiana State University. According to the American Tarantula Society (you knew there had to be one), Tarantula\'s are not dangerous to humans. The library is, however, still concerned that there may be \"hatchlings\" lurking somewhere.
More

Museums & Libraries Want 9/11 Artifacts

Museums and libraries around the country are hoping to get their hands on artifacts from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The items range from personal memorabilia from victims and survivors, to makeshift flags, cards, notes, photographs, and more. The Smithsonian may receive $5 million in order to collect and preserve the items. A web site may also be created where people from all over the country can submit the email that they sent on that day. More

Coca Cola Fizzes Over New Archive

John Geralds writes...
\"Coca Cola is building an online digital media archive, which will make it the first company to move an entire advertising and brand history to an online digital media environment.
The archive will include everything from the very first press ad, which appeared in 1886, to the famous 1970s Coca Cola Hilltop commercial that featured the \'I\'d Like To Buy The World a Coke jingle.\' The system will bring together more than 9,000 graphical images, over 7,000 text documents and an advertising library which will ultimately contain more than 25,000 television ads and corporate videos.\" More

Research library top collections include Black press

From Black
Voices
:

\"We asked Bernard Reilly, president of The Center
for Research Libraries, to list his facility\'s 10 most
interesting collections. Here is the list, and his
comments.\"

The list includes The African-American Press
Collection, Khmer Rouge Top Secret Documents,
Civilian Conservation Corps Newspapers, 1934-1942,
The Ethnic Press in the United States and more....

See the Full Story

Student Employee, Professor\'s Son, Steals $2 Million in Rare Books from Yale

The son of a Yale University professor, and summer employee of one of the University libraries has admitted to stealing items form the archives and selling them. Libraries whose collections contain rare materials are often an easy target for thieves, even though the libraries themselves take extensive precautionary measures to guard against theft. Since many libraries don\'t report the theft of materials, there is no way of knowing exactly how costly the problem really is, overall. More

Ex-Soviet Films and Photos on the Web

Carol Reed writes \"Newsday.com has an article on a Texas business man who is arranging to have the films and photos from several ex-Soviet Archives cataloged and put up on the Web.It looks like a very interesting project. It\'s still a work in progress, but the archives in Russia have a nearly complete collection of newsreels from 1919-1985, and the earliest film is of the coronation of Czar Nicholas II in 1896. Here\'s a link to the archives web page -- the link at the end of the Newsday.com story is somewhat messed up.\"

University Libraries Embrace Information Technology

Steven Bell writes \"Here\'s a nice article about the library at Penn State University that appeared in one of their campus publications. I\'m providing the Link that appeared in Distance-Educator.com.\"

\"Where does anyone looking for information
go? For 150 years, people have gone to the
public library for books, reference materials,
periodicals, research and peace. There is no
other institution so accessible to the public.
It costs its patrons next to nothing. Its boundaries
are completely colorblind and bias-free,
ageless. It is almost always open. And it is changing.\"

Archives Site Captures Web\'s Growing Pains

\"As a tool for archiving information, the Internet is a wonder, especially in its ability to make a variety of materials, from magazine articles to video clips, accessible to people around the world. But the Internet hasn\'t always been up to the job of archiving itself. That\'s changing, with the launch of the Wayback Machine, a repository of Web pages from the Internet Archive (www.archive.org), a nonprofit based in San Francisco. With the Wayback Machine, you can surf the Web as it was. Which means, in practical terms, the chance for researchers, historians and others to gaze back in time at snapshots of Web sites such as ESPN.com, Lycos or even out-of-business companies like Webvan.com. \'Wayback,\' it should be noted, means way back to 1996.\" More

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