Academic Libraries

20 Million Accessed 1901 UK Census in First Week

Or tried to, anyhow - a flood of genealogists has swamped the servers of the UK\'s Public Records Office, which unveiled the online version of the census this week:

The growing fascination with family history came to the fore this week when an estimated 20m people attempted to access the newly launched online version of the 1901 census.

Designed to cope with just 1.2m visitors a day, the site effectively seized up with a couple of hours and within 24 hours had been withdrawn for a quick overhaul that the Public Records Office said would allow more people to log on.

Plans to put all Victorian census records online are also to be speeded up to meet the obvious demand from a public fascinated with when their relatives were born, married and died and how they lived their lives . . .

More from the Guardian.

1901 UK Census Available Online, Heavily Used

An editorial from the London Evening Standard:

The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. Or so LP Hartley told us in the opening sentence of his novel The Go-Between, published in 1953. But we\'re now keener than mustard to catch hold of all our yesterdays.

Two days ago, the Kewbased Public Record Office was stunned by the overwhelmingly avid response to its decision to put the 1901 census on line (the most recent census released under the 100-year rule that protects individuals\' privacy). I\'m surprised at its surprise. The Public Record Office should have known that, these days, everyone wants to be a DIY historian . . .

More. The 1901 census data can be examined here, although as Ananova recently reported, heavy demand is making it difficult to use the site.

Review of Legal Portals

LLRX writes \"Weighing the
Benefits of Legal Portals

Cindy Curling reviews the major and minor legal portals, detailing the strengths and weaknesses in their respective services and content.
\"

Blessed be the ties that bind...

Lee Hadden writes: \"The Georgia State University library is undergoing repairs for
brickwork that was done only fifteen years ago. The repair work will cost
the state about 7 million dollars, compared to the $10 million it took to
build the library in the first place. Metal ties, used to keep brickwork
attached to the frame of the building, were unaccountably left out during
construction. Without them, some bricks and other debris have fallen from
the building. Blessed be the ties that bind...

The latest repair estimate for the 15-year-old building, which cost $10
million to build, is $7 million. Of that, $5.8 million has been set aside,
while the regents, GSU and the Georgia State Financing and Investment
Commission continue to try to find the rest.
Full Story

Historical \"ephemeral films\" archive - free .avi downloads.

Archive.org/movies
This site is just plain cool, it\'s a quirky historical archive of 
short, old movies and films (ads, educational, propaganda films, and others)
available in two different formats: .mpg (mpeg-2) and DivX
.avi\'s (mpeg-4).

From Archive.org\'s description:
\"This collection contains movies that the Prelinger
Archives
has digitized (about 956 now online) and donated to the Internet
Archive. The films focus mainly on everyday life, culture, industry, and
institutions in North America in the 20th century.\"

Browse through the looong title
list
or read \"About
This Collection
\". I especially enjoyed the article
by Bart Eisenberg where
the archivist, Rick Prelinger, \"calls himself a \"media archaeologist.\"

LISNews searches: movie
-|- film
-|- Archive.org.

-Hermit ;-)

Library of Congress adds \'Jaws,\' \'Apes\' & \'Animal House\' to Film Registry

Librarian of Congress James Billington has selected 25 films to be added to the National Film Registry. \"Each year Billington chooses 25 that are culturally, historically or aesthetically significant for inclusion in the Registry. For each title named to the Registry, the Library of Congress works to ensure that the film is preserved for all time.\" According to Billington, \"Our film heritage is America\'s living past. It celebrates the creativity and inventiveness of diverse communities and our nation as a whole. By preserving American films, we safeguard our history and build toward the future.\" Click below for the list of this year\'s movie titles. -- Read More

Live Tarantula Found in the Stacks at ISU

Imagine going into the stacks and discovering a tarantula. It happened at the Indiana State University. According to the American Tarantula Society (you knew there had to be one), Tarantula\'s are not dangerous to humans. The library is, however, still concerned that there may be \"hatchlings\" lurking somewhere.
More

Museums & Libraries Want 9/11 Artifacts

Museums and libraries around the country are hoping to get their hands on artifacts from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The items range from personal memorabilia from victims and survivors, to makeshift flags, cards, notes, photographs, and more. The Smithsonian may receive $5 million in order to collect and preserve the items. A web site may also be created where people from all over the country can submit the email that they sent on that day. More

Coca Cola Fizzes Over New Archive

John Geralds writes...
\"Coca Cola is building an online digital media archive, which will make it the first company to move an entire advertising and brand history to an online digital media environment.
The archive will include everything from the very first press ad, which appeared in 1886, to the famous 1970s Coca Cola Hilltop commercial that featured the \'I\'d Like To Buy The World a Coke jingle.\' The system will bring together more than 9,000 graphical images, over 7,000 text documents and an advertising library which will ultimately contain more than 25,000 television ads and corporate videos.\" More

Research library top collections include Black press

From Black
Voices
:

\"We asked Bernard Reilly, president of The Center
for Research Libraries, to list his facility\'s 10 most
interesting collections. Here is the list, and his
comments.\"

The list includes The African-American Press
Collection, Khmer Rouge Top Secret Documents,
Civilian Conservation Corps Newspapers, 1934-1942,
The Ethnic Press in the United States and more....

See the Full Story

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