Academic Libraries

A librarian\'s legacy

From the Washington Post:

One of the best, most underused collections of Judaica and Hebraica in the country is located at George Washington University.

Donated six years ago by the family of I. Edward Kiev, the chief librarian of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York City, the collection contains more than 18,000 books and manuscripts on religion, philosophy, the classics and the arts . . .

Reuven Schlencker, a rabbinical scholar and cataloguer at the university\'s Marion Gelman Library, calls the archive \"one of the top 10 university collections of Judaica in the country.\" Besides the Library of Congress, no other area library approaches the Kiev Collection in range and depth of Judaic studies, he said.

More. More information about the Kiev Collection can be found here.

1930 U.S. Census Data Available

From the New York Times (registration required):

Joseph Pierre Leclerc was a womanizing bounder who drank too much, beat his children and made a habit of marrying within a month of his last divorce.

After years of research, Michael J. Leclerc knew that much for sure about his unlamented great-grandfather, who died in 1968. What the great-grandson did not know - what had him out after midnight scrolling through just-released microfilm here at the northeast regional office of the National Archives - was which of his great-grandfather\'s countless women was living with him in 1930 when census takers knocked on his front door . . .

Such were the prickly personal questions that brought genealogy buffs out during vampire hours here and across the country for the unveiling of information on individuals and families gathered in the 1930 census. Under federal law, this data, which, most juicily, discloses who was living with whom and in what dwelling, is kept secret for privacy reasons until 72 years have come and gone . . .

More. The National Archives has finding aids for the census available online. -- Read More

Future of Academic Libraries Bib

I ran into this Future of Academic Libraries Bibliography while doing some research the other day. It does cover much more than just the future of academic libraries as well.

The resources provided cover the following topics: creativity, future of libraries, information services, innovative tech, leadership, organizational learning, professional development, strategic planning, technical services/collection development, staff development, and technology. Formats include: journal articles, books, book chapters, and Web sites.

British Library Preserving Digital Heritage

The average lifespan for a website is 60 days. \"To a librarian, whose whole role in life is to preserve information, that is the stuff of sleepless nights.\"

As well as regularly archiving 10,000 sites, the British Library will take half-yearly \"snapshots\" of the entire .uk domain, which is presently 25 million webpages, with 60,000 being registered monthly. The library plans to create a cross section of British websites, consciously choosing a variety of sites, \"for example, we chose the Soil Association site and also the Monsanto site, to see how the debates on GM foods matched up.\" The archive will be cataloged, somehow, and they are investigated getting copyright clearance so that the public can browse the archives.Read the Full Story here

Georgetown Library in dispute over Graham Greene

Luis Acosta writes \"Here is a story from today\'s NY Times in a dispute involving Georgetown\'s Lauinger Library and scholars trying to get access to the papers of Graham Greene:

While Greene\'s authorized biographer toils away on the third volume of Greene\'s biography, other scholars are being denied access to Greene\'s papers by virtue of the library\'s restrictive reading of Greene\'s ambiguous intentions. \"
Also available at Yahoo.

The problems arise from a pointedly inserted a single comma that may or may not have drastically changed a document making it clear that he had authorized one writer to be his official biographer

Appeal seeks to keep classical music treasures in the UK

Charles Davis Sent in this Story from
Ananova on an appeal launched to buy a unique collection of classical music treasures.

The Royal Philharmonic Society archive could be split up or
leave the UK unless the cash appeal succeeds, the British
Library said today.


Deborah Bloom also sent in A Second Story on the same thing.

Romans Clash Over Musical Treasures

Charles Davis passed along
This One
on the president of one of Romes most venerable musical institutions, who has sparked a row with
another organisation over the custody of valuable music artefacts.
He had joked that in their new home, musical treasures would be preserved and available for
research, unlike the original manuscript of Bellinis Norma, which he said is currently being gnawed
by mice under the very noses of the librarians.

But a journalist took the comment seriously and the librarian of the Conservatorio was asked to
respond.

Campaigners urge action to preserve digital heritage

Charles Davis writes \"from
Ananova Story
With More at the \"The Guardian\" where they say

Academics are warning that more needs to be done to
preserve Britain\'s digital heritage.

The Digital Preservation Coalition fears over-reliance on
technology means important contemporary records could
be lost to future generations.

\"

Spies, Lies and the Distortion of History

Luis Acosta writes \"The Washington Post, in a story about a KGB archivist who meticulously collected and smuggled out information concerning the KGB\'s activities in Afganistan after the 1979 Soviet invasion, calls the archivist\'s work \"one of the most impressive acts of heroism ever performed by a librarian.\" More generally, the story highlights the difficulty of reconstructing history when events are manipulated by layers of misinformation by competing intelligence agencies.
See Steve Coll, \"Spies, Lies and the Distortion of History,\" Washington Post, February 24, 2002, page B1, or On The Web \"

Art In Libraries

Charles Davis passed along this Ananova Story on Ten Leonardo da Vinci drawings from the Royal Library at Windsor Castle that are going on show to mark the Queen\'s Golden Jubilee.


In other art/library news, A boy of 10 discovered a long-lost Victorian painting worth up to £600,000 hanging above a bookcase in his school library.

The work, The Fate Of Persephone, was by leading British painter Walter Crane and had last been heard of in Germany in 1923 and is estimated at between £400,000 and £600,000.It will be put up for auction at Christie\'s in London on June 12th, just in case you have a few hundred thousand pounds in your fines jar you don\'t know what to do with.
That\'s about 856,850 US Dollars now.

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