Academic Libraries

Pay upgrade for librarians

Marlene writes " Youngstown State University studied their salary schedule and decided it was time for an upgrade. Position affected were..

"Administrative/professional employees hold midlevel, nonsupervisory positions — such as counselor, academic adviser, librarian , student activities specialist and computer center employee. They represent the lowest-paid employee group on campus, and the former salary structure had not been updated in about 20 years, officials said."

Digital Diamond New Jewel in Temple U's Crown

David Dillard has a story to tell about Temple University's Digital Diamond digitizing project: "...for those who would like to see a major chunk of Philadelphia in photographs that can be found through keyword term searches, this resource will be found to be a wonderful treasure." Read the (somewhat edited) text of his tale below...

British Library acquires unique 19th Century Famil

Charles Davis writes "Spotted at
The ResourceShelf.
A unique and important album of nineteenth-century Indian watercolours has been acquired by the British Library. The paintings show views of Mughal and pre-Mughal monuments in Delhi, many of which no longer survive...Following
conservation work the Metcalfe Album is now on display in the John Ritblat Treasures
Gallery at the British Library in London, until 1 October 2003. The album will also be
digitised and the images will be freely accessible on the Library's Collect Britain website at
www.bl.uk/collectbritain during 2004. Some information and images are already
available on the British Library website."

Tabloid archive to be destroyed

The anthrax-laden headquarters of American Media, Inc., parent company of the National Enquirer, Star and other tabloids, has been purchased for $40,000, on the condition that all the contents within, be destroyed. The building has stood empty since it was evacuated in late 2001 after becoming contaminated with anthrax which killed an editor and sparked a nation-wide anthrax scare. Included in the contents to be destroyed is an archive of over five million photos of everything tabloid--from Bigfoot and 200 lb. babies to celebrities caught in compromising and less-than-classy situations. More here from the New York Times.

Burned UGA Library to Reopen Today

News From GA where just in time for the first day of classes, the badly burned main library at the University of Georgia is expected to reopen.


School officials say repair and cleaning crews worked non-stop for several weeks in order to repair and refurbish the library.

Fire investigators say an arsonist set fire to the area July 23. Firefighters managed to contain the blaze to the second floor of the university building, although the flames destroyed a storage room that held used computer equipment.

Blitzmail

An Anonymous Patron writes "Kind of a Neat Story on the BlitzMail system at Dartmouth College. For nearly 20 years, the 13,000-odd students, faculty and staff members of Dartmouth have communicated by using Blitzmail. Strictly speaking, Blitzmail is a campuswide e-mail system, but it is so fast that it qualifies as instant messaging. And as instant messaging becomes a fixture on college campuses, Blitzmail serves as a signpost for what others might come to expect when most communication on campus is accomplished by way of keyboards."

Old print surfaces anew at library

Charles Davis writes "from story at
News-journalonline.com while cleaning off shelves in a back room at the Edgewater Library this summer,
Librarian Ruth McCormack made a rare discovery. She found a framed certificate --
dated 1911 -- which featured an artist's rendering of Ross stitching the 13-star flag while
President George Washington and two other national delegates watched.
In the bottom righthand corner, a decoratively written message thanks Hawks Park
School for donating dimes toward the restoration of Ross' famous house in
Philadelphia."

CA Regional Oral History Office turns up the volume

Ack writes "One From CA that says history is written by the victors, goes the saying, and the official record of significant events does seem to favor those who benefit most from their outcome. Yet ascertaining what really happened also means determining what role may have been played by those people not immortalized in newspaper articles, biographies, or carefully archived letters.
That's where the Regional Oral History Office (ROHO), a division of UC Berkeley's Bancroft Library, comes in."

Battle begins for US Bill of Rights

Charles Davis writes "One hundred and thirty-eight years after a nameless soldier from Ohio rummaged through the wreckage of the state house for North
Carolina looking for a memento of the defeated Confederacy and looted an original copy of the Bill of Rights, the state has mounted
a legal challenge for its return.
The relic was priceless, even in 1865, handwritten by three scribes and sent to the first 13 states by George Washington in 1791.
However, it all but disappeared until last March, when an antique dealer offered to sell the document to a new museum in
Philadelphia.
Full story at
The Guardian"

Libraries and Books on NPR

Anonymous Patron writes "Speaking of stories on NPR, the audio archives of "All Things Considered" for Sunday, August 10 contain two interesting stories: one about the water damage at the Peabody Library, and one about a typical week at Rare Book School at UVA.
You can listen at
NPR.org"

Preserving Pages in Charlottesville talks about the Visit to the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia.

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