Academic Libraries

E.D. TAB: Academic Libraries: 2000

Nifty New Report based on information from the 2000 Academic Libraries Survey. The tables in this publication summarize library services, library staff, library collections and library expenditures for libraries in degree granting postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Report PDF. See also, Past Reports

Precious Iraq relics found in cesspool

CNN has the story about two recovered items that were looted from Baghdad's main museum.

The Akkadian Bassetki, a copper statue of a seated man dating from 2300 BC, and an ancient Assyrian firebox that a king would have used to keep himself warm were recovered by police investigators, the authorities said Thursday.

The Bassetki statue is considered the most important of Iraq's ancient artworks after the so-called Warka Mask of a Sumerian goddess, recovered earlier this year.

"As far as I can tell their condition is OK, although they still need a bit of cleaning up," Russell said.

Web pages and e-books to be saved for nation

A little blurb in the UK's Telegraph about the Legal Deposit Libraries Act, which entitles six depository libraries copies of electronic publications, when they differ significantly from the print. So what about publications that are online only?

Chris Mole, the MP who sponsored the legislation as a Private Member's Bill, said: "We must ensure that the 21st century is not written about in future centuries as a new Dark Age where significant data and records are missing because certain formats were not collected and saved for posterity."

Changing times for academic libraries

tangognat writes "Richard C. Atkinson writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education about the problems that academic libraries face with current trends in academic publishing.
http://chronicle.com/free/v50/i11/11b01601.htm"

Picasso's legendary piles of paper

Charles Davis writes: "from
Yahoo UK:

Pablo Picasso may well
have been one of the artistic giants of the
20th century, but he was also one of the
century's mightiest hoarders of minutia.
"Why should I throw away what's been
good enough to fall into my hands?" he
once said.

At his death in 1973, hundreds of cardboard boxes crammed
with old papers and thousands of letters tied in batches with bits
of string -- not to mention more than 20,000 art works collected
over a lifetime -- were handed over to the museums and archives
made guardians of the Picasso legacy.

Thus the Picasso museum in Paris has more than 15,000 of his
photographs, some 2,000 postcards, 900-odd birthday cards
from 1961 when he turned 80, hundreds of visiting cards, 130
tailors' bills, tickets to bullfights, shopping-lists, priceless
doodles, etc.

These, along with circus tickets, newspaper clippings
chronicling the great events of the century and letters and notes
from some of the biggest names in art, literature and music of
the time are on show at a just-opened exhibit at the Picasso
Museum, entitled "We Are What We Keep" that runs until
January 1"

Bodleian helps re-create 12th-century herb garden

Charles Davis writes: "from
ic Liverpool:

MEDIEVAL monks used
herbs to treat ailments
such as rickets and TB
centuries before the
discovery of modern drugs
like penicillin.

Now, 800 years later,
research has allowed
gardeners at a Cheshire
monastery to recreate a
12th-century medical herb
garden for the first time.
Academics from Oxford University and experts from Kew Gardens
used ancient manuscripts stored in the Bodleian Library to ensure
authenticity.

Letter from Liz I, other Archival Material up for Auction

Charles Davis writes "The Herald (UK) reports on the auction of archival material, including a letter written by Elizabeth I which sheds new light on her doomed relationship with Mary Queen of Scots. In the nearly illegible 5 pages, Elizabeth expresses outrage over Mary's imprisonment on an island in Loch Leven in 1567. The letter is from one of the world's finest collections of British documents, covering almost 1000 years of history. The archive, estimated to be worth £2m, is the property of Americans Harry and Birgitte Spiro.
The Christie's auction, which will take place in London on December 3, involves 160 items from the collection."

Sotheby's to sell rare occult book collection

LISNews British Correspondent Charles Davis writes: "Story at
The Guardian:

Books from one of the most eccentric collections in the country are being sold to settle some of the collector's debts.

The Sotheby's auction next month will include around 600 books, mainly on witchcraft and the occult: a tiny part of the vast library of
the late artist Robert Lenkiewicz.

It includes a 17th century spotter's guide to witches and demons, by Joseph Glanvill. His Saducismus Triumphatus was a desperate
attempt to convince sceptics that ghosts and demons were all too real, and included the first-hand evidence of one Elizabeth Styles
that the devil had appeared to her 'in the shape of a handsome Man and after of a black Dog. Then he promised her money, and that
she should live gallantly, and have the pleasure of the world for 12 years, if she would with her blood sign his paper'"

Research Libraries and University Presses Issue Statement

Anna writes "The Association of American University Presses (AAUP) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) have formulated a Joint Statement on Scholarly Communication. The Statement sets forth the complementary roles of press and library within higher education, and indicates a strengthened commitment to cooperation and joint action.

With increased stresses on the system of scholarly communication-arising from swiftly changing technologies and difficult economic times-the two associations believe that both challenges and opportunities can be best addressed by cooperation within the academy.

"As a practical matter librarians and publishers work together all the time, and research libraries and university presses are already collaborating on some exciting joint ventures at a number of campuses," states Peter Givler, Executive Director of the AAUP. "I'm delighted with this formal recognition of our common interests, and look forward to the wonderful new opportunities for cooperation between our two organizations it creates."

Full text of the Joint Statement is available as a PDF."

Letters show Lady Nelson capable of love after all.

Charles Davis writes: "Unlike Emma Hamilton she never whipped off her knickers to dance on dining tables - but Lord Nelson's wife, Frances, was not the
dry old shrew that history has painted her either.

A lost hoard of Lady Nelson's piteous letters about her errant husband found in a trunk in Germany two years ago are finally
revealing their secrets. And it is Lady Hamilton, who stole the naval hero's heart, who plays the role of villain.

Beautiful, scheming, entrancing Emma made sure that the plainer Frances was elbowed out for the rest of Nelson's life.
Story at
The Guardian"

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