Academic Libraries

What You Can Do To Support School Libraries In Crisis

Carl Harvey II writes in In today's Huffington Post:

As the leader of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and an educator, I am struck by the lack of support for school libraries from federal and local governments. Do decision makers fully realize how their lack of support will hinder the education of America's next generation? Due to the lack of funding for school libraries, students are at risk of not having some of the most critical 21st century skills needed to compete in the global marketplace.

There is a common misconception that technology replaces school libraries and school librarians. Rather, in reality the explosion of technology and information access makes having full-time access to a state certified school librarian and school library program even more critical for today's learners. There is an entire new skill set today's students will need as they enter the workplace, and school librarians are the leaders in helping teach these skills to students.

The Aesthetics of Libraries

There is a lot of talk of the threat that digital services like Amazon bring to the library industry in general (as this site's sub-title so slyly indicates). But one thing Amazon and online libraries in general cannot do is replicate the feel and aesthetics of a library (especially some of the big ones ).

Evaluating Research By the Numbers

Evaluating Research By the Numbers
"Last week I taught an information literacy class to a group of senior Chemistry students. We didn’t talk about databases or indexes, we talked about numbers. We talked about impact factors and h-indexes and alternative metrics, and the students loved it. Librarians have used these metrics for years in collection development, and have looked them up to help faculty with tenure and promotion packets. But many librarians don’t know where the numbers come from, or what some of the criticisms are."

Montreal's Grande Bibliotheque How to stay in circulation

Montreal's Grande Bibliothèque: How to stay in circulation

Contrary to the popular misconception of libraries as stacks of musty books, they have long been at the forefront of information technology, maintains Amy Buckland, a librarian at McGill University in charge of electronic scholarship, e-publishing and digitization of rare books.

"People who say that libraries are on the way out have no idea what we do," she says. "We've always been ahead of things in that sense and we still are."

Buckland views Google not as a threat, but as an adjunct to the librarian's role.

"Librarians use Google all the time," she says. "It is handy for quick questions. But how do you vet the quality of these things? That's what librarians do. We teach our users how to find the quality answers."

Why You Should Honor Your Campus Library

Maria Shine Stewart authors the "A Kinder Campus" column for Inside Higher Ed. She focuses on what we can do as members of academic communities to improve our relationships, treat each other with respect and build better communities. Apparently she thinks very highly of the campus library as a community builder - owing to the strengths academic librarians bring to the community. From the column:

Information Literacy For The Mythical Digital Natives

I wish I could've used this as the title for this post: "Designing information literacy instruction without understanding that feral place where many library users reside is about as effective as taming a wolf. We can do it, but what good does that do for the wolf?"

GREAT post from Joe Grobelny: Feral "Information Literacy"

"Digital native is a fantasy invented by the fans of silicon valley to pigeonhole a generation for the sake of selling technology, but the truth is far less convenient. Not only the digital natives, but many people take on a feral state in their interactions with the internet, as it constantly shifts its boundaries, its cities and deserts. Likewise, the library is a place where we ought to allow for the feral. The ACRL information literacy standards are only useful to the domesticated to promote their efficient and purposeful use of the library. The truth is that most people do not experience the library as a city, but rather as a wilderness on the edge of civilization.

See Also: Matthew Battles, The Call of the Feral.

Librarians: Stuck between the rock of the vendors and the hard place of the patrons

Over at Attempting Elegance, Jenica Rogers is "Feeling Pointy":

"I am, professionally and personally, livid; I do not appreciate condescension, eradication of librarians’ professional expertise, or sidestepping of questions that are completely valid in a consumer-seller relationship in which a carefully delineated accreditation relationship is also involved. Our vendors seem to think that going straight to the faculty is going to benefit them, but I don’t understand their logic in sidestepping librarians. We’re the ones with the budgets. We’re the ones they have to work with. Yes, our faculty are influential, key stakeholders and partners, and are the source of our research agenda and teaching and learning needs, but still: How is undermining and alienating the librarian middleman going to help business?

Anger and bewilderment aside, I’m caught between the proverbial rock and hard place — I must support the faculty and students who rely on the research materials published by the ACS. But I must also strive to manage the budgets, resources

Librarians archivists to commence strike

Librarians, archivists to commence strike
This afternoon, librarians and archivists at The University of Western Ontario announced they would commence strike action effective 12:01 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 8

The 51 members of the bargaining unit are represented by the University of Western Ontario Faculty Association (UWOFA). The librarians and archivists and the university have been meeting since April 26, working to renew the group’s second contract, which ended June 30.

Peer review and the corruption of science

Peer review and the corruption of science
Pressure on scientists to publish has led to a situation where any paper, however bad, can now be printed in a journal that claims to be peer-reviewed...By and large, the problem does not arise from outright fraud, which is rare. It arises from official pressure to publish when you have nothing to say.

[Thanks, Alexa!]

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