Academic Libraries

Academic News

Amazon Sells Way Fewer Books To Academic Libraries Than People Think

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 02/12/2019 - 10:20
Is Amazon taking over the academic library industry? That's what a new study from a higher-education-focused non-profit takes a look at, and their findings might surprise you as long as you haven't read the title of this article too closely. For the study, Ithaka S+R gathered acquisitions data from 124 U.S.

Library Acquisition Patterns Report From Ithaka S+R

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 09:30
The findings of this report consist of two distinct areas: 1) an analysis of library book acquisitions within the specified sample for fiscal year 2017 at 124 US academic institutions, and 2) a trend line analysis of print and e-books acquired within the specified sample, the university press presence in these libraries, and the leading vendors of books at 51 US academic institutions for fiscal years 2014 through 2017.

San Jose library remodels to stop suicides

Submitted by rteeter on Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:34

About 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1, a 36-year-old San Jose man shocked patrons and employees of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. library by climbing over a seventh-floor railing and plunging to his death in the building’s atrium.

As the second suicide in 13 months in the downtown library atrium, the grisly death cast a pall over the joint city-university building, which was closed down until the next morning.

Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science?

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 16:44
The core of Elsevier’s operation is in scientific journals, the weekly or monthly publications in which scientists share their results. Despite the narrow audience, scientific publishing is a remarkably big business. With total global revenues of more than £19bn, it weighs in somewhere between the recording and the film industries in size, but it is far more profitable. In 2010, Elsevier’s scientific publishing arm reported profits of £724m on just over £2bn in revenue.

What it was like to be peer reviewed in the 1860s

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 05/10/2017 - 10:14
That path from submission to revision and publication will sound familiar to modern scientists. However, Tyndall’s experience with the Philosophical Transactions—in particular, with its refereeing system—was quite different from what authors experience today. Tracing “On the absorption and radiation of heat” through the Royal Society’s editorial process highlights how one of the world’s most established refereeing systems worked in the 1860s.

Privacy and Academic Libraries Right Now

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 05/02/2017 - 15:30
Beyond reading this report and preprint, what can we do to learn more and help protect our patrons’ privacy (and our own)? Keeping up with these issues is a good first step.... We can also work to audit our own internal library systems and practices, and to push the vendors we work with to protect patron privacy. Further, we can increase digital privacy awareness among ourselves, our coworkers, and our patrons.
From Privacy and Academic Libraries Right Now | ACRLog