Academic Libraries

The 16 Coolest College Libraries In The Country

Many of these buildings are iconic structures on their campuses, and have housed generations of studying students. Others were built more recently, and show how technology can shape the future of education.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/coolest-college-libraries-2014-4

Librarian Peenalized for his Peeculiar Behavior

So much for privacy, at Florida Atlantic University anyway.

When Seth Thompson was asked why he decided to shoot videos of men urinating in bathrooms at Florida Atlantic University, he told campus police he launched his strange hobby merely to see if he could get away with it. That personal challenge — coupled with his decision to post 13 of the videos on Internet porn sites — will cost the 40-year-old Lake Worth man a year of his life.

After struggling for nearly a week to decide the appropriate punishment for the man who worked at the Jaffe Center for Book Arts at FAU’s library, Palm Beach County Circuit Judge David Crow on Thursday sentenced Thompson to 364 days in the county jail.

As about 10 friends and family members looked on, silently weeping, Thompson was immediately slapped in handcuffs and taken to jail. He mouthed words of support to his backers as he struggled to hold back tears.

SU Libraries Hosts First Human Library Event

http://news.syr.edu/su-libraries-hosts-first-human-library-event-83601/

The Syracuse University Libraries, in partnership with the School of Information Studies and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, will host its first Human Library on Wednesday, April 9, from 3-6 p.m. in Bird Library. In the Human Library, the books you sign out are real people from the SU campus community representing a variety of cultural backgrounds, areas of expertise and life experiences. The event is intended to encourage diversity and challenge stereotypes and prejudices.

The Oberlin Group Statement on Ebooks & Libraries

http://www.oberlingroup.org/node/14801

To summarize, we do not live in isolation. We all find ourselves impoverished—always indirectly and sometimes directly—when information fails to reach those in need. Our commitment to sharing is fundamental, as is our commitment to promoting and demanding models that make such sharing possible.

We thus assert the following: Contracts without provisions for transmitting material beyond our home institutions undermine our commitments to each other and artificially circumscribe the larger scholarly ecosystem. They constrain the research of students and faculty at our home institutions, who will soon find themselves unable to obtain essential material from institutions failing to secure such provisions. Looking out for ourselves means looking out for others.

Attacking Academic Values

http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/2014/03/27/attacking-academic-values/
"This last point is why I have moved, in the past few days, from laughing at the bumbling way NPG seems to be fighting its battle against OA policies to a sense of real outrage. This effort to punish faculty who have voted for an internal and perfectly legal open access policy is nothing less than an attack on one of the core principles of academic freedom, faculty governance. NPG thinks it has the right to tell faculties what policies are good for them and which are not, and to punish those who disagree."

Colleges Need Free Speech More Than Trademarks

Colleges Need Free Speech More Than Trademarks
http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Need-Free-Speech-More/144907/
Registrations and rights-claiming of this sort are unwarranted in higher education. Trademarks are meant to be vehicles for reducing consumer confusion, not rewards for brand-building. Because trademark registrations signify rights to commercial uses of words, rights holders and the public often mistakenly think they confer ownership of words themselves. This misperception tends to promote risk aversion and stifle otherwise fair expression. Determining when a mark is confusingly similar to another, or distinguishing impermissible commercial uses of a term from fair uses of it, is complicated.

Students, faculty decry Penn plan to cut math and science libraries

Students, faculty decry Penn plan to cut math and science libraries

A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research.

Read more at:
philly.com/philly/education/20140311_Students__faculty_decry_Penn_plan_to_cut_math_and_science_libraries.html

Rare books stolen from Becker College Library

A British man named Joseph Heath was ordered to pay $3,000 to Becker College library after stealing 100 rare books, including one signed by Abraham Lincoln, The Telegram reports.

The 53-year-old Leicester native had smuggled around $115,000 out of the antique book collection of the library. One of the books he took was a first edition o Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

Heath, a janitor at the college, had offered the missing books or sale to private collectors, as well as posting them on Craigslist.

Heath’s book pilfering was discovered when he tried to sell books to the Leicester Historical Society, and one of the board members recognized the editions.

How Academia and Publishing are Destroying Scientific Innovation

http://kingsreview.co.uk/magazine/blog/2014/02/24/how-academia-and-publishing-are-destroying...

"I think there was a time, and I’m trying to trace the history when the rights to publish, the copyright, was owned jointly by the authors and the journal. Somehow that’s why the journals insist they will not publish your paper unless you sign that copyright over. It is never stated in the invitation, but that’s what you sell in order to publish. And everybody works for these journals for nothing. There’s no compensation. There’s nothing. They get everything free. They just have to employ a lot of failed scientists, editors who are just like the people at Homeland Security, little power grabbers in their own sphere.

If you send a PDF of your own paper to a friend, then you are committing an infringement."

Library Consortium Tests Interlibrary Loans of e-Books

http://chronicle.com/article/Library-Consortium-Tests/144743/
Worried about security and sales, many publishers and vendors permit individual e-book chapters to be shared but don’t routinely include the lending of whole e-books in library contracts. Even when licenses do allow e-book lending, libraries typically lack the technology to make it work. You can’t just pop an e-book into an envelope and ship it off by delivery van or the post office.

But lending e-books may soon get easier. This spring a pilot project called Occam’s Reader will test software custom-built to make it both easy and secure for libraries to share e-book files while keeping publishers happy—or so the software’s creators hope.

Syndicate content