Overdue Book

Sad Book Returned to NYPL After 54 Years

From Melville House:

Every so often, a book is returned to the library so late, it makes headlines. The due date of the sad book in this particular headline was August 17, 1959.

The New York Public Library recently received a copy of Ideal Marriage by Th.H. Van de Velde, M.D. The librarian reports it’s a “very wordy” and scientific guide to sex from 1926. (It’s “certainly more juicy than The Tropic of Cancer,” writes Billy Parrott of the Mid-Manhattan Library.)

It was such a source of shame, it wasn’t returned by the patron, but by his in-laws after the patron’s death:

We found this book amongst my late brother-in-law’s things. Funny thing is the book didn’t support his efforts with his first (and only) marriage… it failed! No wonder he hid the book! So sorry!!

A shocked in-law

On the Return of a Long-Lost Library Book, the World Rejoices

On the Return of a Long-Lost Library Book, the World Rejoices
"What's really curious, however, is the staying power of this rather quotidian story, our seemingly endless fascination with an old book returning to the place where it belongs."

Never gets old for me!
[Thanks Bob!]

Man Returns Library Book 41 Years Late And Pays $300 Fine

Library book 41 years overdue is finally returned to the Champaign County Library. The library received $299.30 in cash and a handwritten note that read:

"To Champaign County Library: Sorry I've kept this book so long, but I'm a really slow reader! I've enclosed my fine of $299.30 (41 years, 2 cents a day). Once again, my apologies."
http://www.wdtn.com/dpp/news/local/champaign/library-book-returned-41-years-overdue#.Ue_JLaH...

Book checked out in 1828 returned to Centre College

Book checked out in 1828 returned to Centre College
book checked out from a Centre College library in 1828 has resurfaced in a desk on the campus of the Kentucky School for the Deaf in Danville.

Unofficially, the book is 185 years overdue. At the current rate of 10 cents per day for late fees, the fine for the volume exceeds $6,000.

Rolling Stones legend has finally been brought to book – for unpaid library fines dating back 50 YEARS

Current darling of the literary world, Keith Richards, is in trouble with his childhood library.

It's hardly the most rock and roll rap he’s ever faced. But after a lifetime of hell-raising Keith Richards has finally been brought to book – for unpaid library fines dating back 50 YEARS.

The Rolling Stones legend, 69, admits he still owes for books he borrowed and failed to return to his local public library in Dartford, Kent, when he was a teenager.

And at 15p a day – plus interest and admin fees – the star could be slapped with a bill for around £3,000.
Keith confessed: “I’ve still got overdue fines from about 50 years ago. They must be astronomical by now.”

But with an estimated personal fortune of £175million the veteran guitarist shouldn’t have too much trouble stumping up. Keith, who was once jailed on drug charges and admits he has drunk so much over the years he can’t remember all the Stones’ songs, reveals he was a bit of a bookworm in his early days.

Woman arrested for returning books late to library

This One is a bit different from the other "arrested for overdue books" stories.
According to police, in July the director of the Easton Public Library [CT], complained an employee of the library, had been using her Trumbull library card and two Easton library cards she had signed up for in the names of her two children, to borrow numerous books, DVDs and magazines from the library. The director told police the employees children were not eligible to receive a town library card because they are not Easton residents.

Chicago Library Patrons Return More Than 100,000 Items During Amnesty Period

Patrons gave more than [Fixed that link] 100,000 books and other items back to the Chicago Public Library during a three-week period where the library granted amnesty from fees.

Spokesman Leland Elder said in a news release that Chicago libraries received 101,301 items during the Once in a Blue Moon amnesty period, which started on Aug. 20 and ended Tuesday. The amnesty applied to overdue books, CDs, DVDs and all other materials.

Overdue Library Book Returned, After 78 Years

It's Finally Back! A Chicago-area woman wanted to return an overdue copy of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" to the Chicago Public Library, but first she wanted to be sure she wouldn't go to jail.

That's because the book, a rare limited edition of the Oscar Wilde novel, was checked out in 1934. Harlean Hoffman Vision found it in her late mother's possessions, with a Chicago Public Library stamp.

Jailed For An Overdue Twilight

A mother of five was put into handcuffs and hauled off to jail for neglecting to return her library book.

Story from the LA Times Jacket Copy. The incarcerated woman, who borrowed the book from the Portales NM Library, plans to sue.

Pardon Them, Librarian, For They Have Sinned

Wednesday, for the first time in more than 25 years, they came to the Anchorage AK Public Library, where amnesty was granted to people with unreturned books. All day, a steady trickle of people arrived to unburden themselves; the sheepish, the guilty and the shamed, into the sun-dappled lobby of the Z.J. Loussac Public Library to make their confessions.

"Once upon a time, in the year of Our Lord 1996, I believe, my wife's sister checked these out," Kirk Dungan told me. He slid a copy of "Traditional Buildings of Britain," "At Home in Scotland," and a curious tome with medieval-looking illustrations titled "Love and Marriage," across the counter Wednesday morning.

You could almost smell the satisfaction. His wife's sister used his wife's card, he said.

The books were from a time when his wife's sister was thinking of moving to Scotland. She wound up in Long Island. And all these years, the books nagged his wife. What if she applied for a job and there was some kind of electronic search and the books popped up? What then? What did it say about a person to have unreturned books in their past? The debt, money-wise, might be small, but karma-wise, it wasn't pretty.

"I'm just happy to be doing it," he said.

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