Announcements

Library for the blind goes digital

From Globe & Mail:

With a massive database of digital books, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) is trying to narrow the information gap that now leaves blind people with access to only 3 per cent of the world\'s printed texts.

\"It will open up a window on the world to blind and visually impaired people,\" says law student Aaron Marsaw, a CNIB client and board member.

Jim Sanders, president and chief executive officer of the Toronto-based CNIB says a $33-million program to digitize the organization\'s library, book production and distribution processes likely will be copied by other libraries for the blind around the world.

Complete article.

SCONUL Newsletter

Antony Brewerton writes \"SCONUL, the UK\'s Society of College, National and University Libraries, is pleased to announce that issue 25 of the SCONUL Newsletter is now available.

Alongside the usual wide and varied collection of articles on topics ranging from space management and collection development to e-initiatives and the promotion of information skills, we have decided to make the main focus of this issue staffing.

The SCONUL Newsletter is available in paper format or electronically via The WWWW

So if you want to know what we are up to in the academic library sector in the UK log on and enjoy! \"

New Selections for Librarian\'s Book Club

Troy Johnson writes \"

The Librarian\'s Book Club(LBC)has posted the reading selections for September. The selected books can be seen at The LBC

The LBC is a reading club that discusses books that relate to libraries and the profession. Anyone is welcome to join. \"

R.R. Bowker Announces Introduction of Standard for Sheet Music

This Announcement From Bowker introduces the International Standard Music Number (ISMN) system, a uniform global standard for identifying all printed music publications available worldwide.
They say it\'s already used around the world, and will do for Music Publishing hhat \"ISBN\" did for book publishing.

Calling All Riot Librrrarians

Just passing on an interesting call for papers, first carried by Library Juice (and various listservs, of course):

Call for submissions for issue #1 of \"riot librarrrian\"

To all feminists library workers and users:

This is a call for submissions for a zine project I am
working on with a friend from library school. The
title will be \"Riot Librarrrian: Breaking the Binding
of Patriarchy since 2001\". It is a zine about
feminism, the library, library workers and the spaces
where these things collide. Though this zine will be
of interest to feminist library workers, the intended
audience will simply be feminists (and those
interested in feminism).

SO-- We are looking for drawings, comics, pictures,
and writings to include in issue #1. We are looking
for stories from feminists (contributions from
feminists of all genders are welcome) about using the
library, working in the library, going to library
school, etc. We will also be including annotated
bibliographies of feminist resources (books, zines,
magazines, websites) for feminists to look for at
their libraries, and to ask their librarians for if
they don\'t find these items. We are looking for
advice for feminists from feminist librarians on how
to use the library. (As an example I will give the
call number ranges of feminist material according to
Dewey and according to LC.) We are also interested in
critiques of the Dewey and LC classification systems
and are planning a small article about Melville Dewey
and what a jerk he was. (I\'ve been told that
prospective students of his library school were
expected to send in their measurements and
escriptions of their eye colors with their
applications!).

If we decide not to include an entry that we receive
we will write a letter explaining why. We will not
edit any entries without first discussing the proposed
changes with the contributor. This zine will be put
together out of our pocket money and we may charge a
dollar or two to cover copying expensives. (We will
be giving away many copies as well.)

Entries should be rather short. Bland entries will
not be considered. Thanks very much for your time. I hope to be bombarded with your feminist brilliance soon.

Sincerely,
Sara (riot librarrrian) Pete
saralibrarian@yahoo.com

Electronic Library Evaluation

The eVALUEd Project Team writes \"eVALUEd is a HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England) funded project, based at the University of Central England. It has been set-up to develop a transferable model for e-library evaluation and to provide dissemination and training in electronic library evaluation. The project commenced in December 2001 and will complete in May 2004.

At this stage, we are conducting a survey to examine good practice in electronic library evaluation, which includes electronic information services, digital collections and virtual libraries. -- Read More

The September 11 Videolog

Annabel Blair, form the BBC, passed along word on the September 11 Videolog.

One year on, as a public service, BBC is hosting the September 11 Videolog, a multimedia forum that supports and streams messages in video or audio formats. This is an experimental community space in which people can share their views and experiences, in vision and sound, to help commemorate the anniversary of September 11, 2001.

Post your thoughts in video or audio at, The BBC Site.

Christys Honor Best in Fiction

Brett Benson from over at Bethany House Publishers points out Bethany House authors scooped up five of eight Christy awards, with WaterBrook, Multnomah, and Broadman & Holman gathering up the rest. Created to promote and expand the reach of Christian fiction, the Christys encourage authors to write to a higher level of excellence. Full list of winners below.

See Also: Literary Faith Fiction Gains Ground over at Publishers Weekly. -- Read More

Winner of 2002 Sanford Berman Award

Steve Fesenmaier writes \"Maria Menendez de Moschel, a member of the Support Staff at the Southdale-Hennepin County Library system, has been awarded the 2002 Sanford Berman Social Responsibility Award for her commitment and outreach to the Latino community. The award was created to honor Sanford Berman, who served as head cataloger at the Hennepin County Library system for 26 years. -- Read More

New doc on last hand-set newspaper in America

Steve Fesenmaeir writes \"B.J. Gudmundsson is directing a new film about Cal Price, the founder of the Pocahontas County Times. This paper was the last hand-set paper in the country. Cal Price was known world-wide for his environmentalist work, showing the people of his county and the world how important preserving the environment was more than 50 years ago. The name of the new film is \"30 - Cal Price and the Pocahontas County Times\". It\'s main sponsor is the Pocahontas County Free Libraries System. Pocahontas County is the highest county east of the Mississippi and home to the first radio telescope, The Green Bank Radio Telescope. Anyone who is interested in the history of journalism in America should support the creation of this film.

CalPriceThirty.com \"

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