Announcements

Promo for LISTen's Shortwave Debut

"In protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act proposal, LISTen will be making its debut on shortwave radio. On New Year's Eve, we'll be on WBCQ The Planet on 5.110 MHz at 6 PM Eastern/11 PM Coordinated Universal Time. The podcast release of the program will occur that night after the radio broadcast ends. Listen over the air while we're in the air."

Creative Commons License

Promo for LISTen's Shortwave Debut by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

0:31 minutes (1.22 MB)
mp3

BookBrewer Library Lending Program

BookBrewer Library Lending Program
We all know that we owe a debt of gratitude to libraries. They help new writers get discovered, make books available to everyone regardless of their ability to pay, and preserve history in a way that can never be replaced.

When you think about your local library, the term "eBook" may not come immediately to mind, but it should. Most libraries now offer eBook lending to patrons in their communities, but they have a problem. They need more content. It's not uncommon for 100% of a library's eBook inventory to be checked out.

There's a reason for this. Current eBook library lending programs are very expensive for local libraries, and they can't keep up with demand. As just one example, the state of Kansas faced a 700% annual increase in fees last year, with other libraries reporting similar increases. These programs also require libraries to pay an annual fee for each book they lend out, something they don't need to do for print titles.

As a result of these opportunities and challenges, libraries are beginning to contact BookBrewer asking for the ability to buy copies of self-published eBooks which they can lend to patrons using their own licensed Digital Rights Management technology. DRM controls how many copies of a book a library can lend out at any one time -- just like with physical books. When demand for a specific book increases, they typically buy more copies of those books to respond to demand. -- Read More

User Research Jumpstart: A Way To Start Studying Your Users

Influx: User Research Jumpstart
If you want to provide relevant services at your library, you need to know your community. To you know your community, you must do user research.

If your library doesn’t currently have a user research program, our User Research Jumpstart is a great way to start.

A Jumpstart will prove the value of user research, increase your library’s user research skill set, and deliver an action plan that will help your library create a better user experience.

After a Jumpstart your library will have
•a user research skill set.
•better knowledge of the lives of your users and their needs.
•increased awareness of user perception of the library.
•a plan for improving the design of your website.
•a plan for improving the functionality of your building.
•a UX vision to guide decisions about library services.

LISNews Hits 40,000 Posts and Turns 12 Years Old

40,000!!!

As usual, I forgot LISNews' birthday a few weeks ago, but LISNews turned 12 (NOT 11 you dummy) years old this month, and just now rolled over 40,000 posts. If you've been around for awhile you already know the rest of the story, if not, I'll spare you the details because you won't read them anyways.

Every year I try to thank everyone who has helped LISNews over these many years. Steve Glabraith, Steven M Cohen & Nabeal Ahmed, were all instrumental in helping me during the early years (when I needed it most!).

We also had a few authors that posted like bloggers possessed, Ieleene, Aaron, Rochelle, and a few other authors who helped out for awhile and moved on. Behind the scenes Joe Frazee helped me get the original LISNews server up and running. Over the years a few dedicated souls have tirelessly submitted stories; Bob Cox, Martin, Lee Hadden, Charles Davis, and many others. Stephen Kellat, for the podcast, Bibliofuture, Robin, Troy, Andy, Dan and all the LISNews authors deserve a big thank you and a pat on the back for all their hard work. LISNews is a collaborative site, and we all work together to make it great.

I'd also like to thank everyone who has ever chipped in to pay for the server, submitted a story, wrote in their journal, left a comment, or just dropped by for a visit.

Happy Birthday LISNews. Here's hoping we have a few more good years ahead of us!

LJ Tech Summit Power to the Patrons: From Systems to Services

Power to the Patrons: From Systems to Services:
Stay one step ahead of technologies driving the user-centric library. December 8, 2011
10 AM-6:00 PM

Library Journal presents our first virtual technology summit, Power to the Patrons: From Systems to Services, an online forum to examine what technologies patrons are using, what technologies they want from their library, and how these technologies can help them discover their place and enhance their connection with the library.

This day-long conference offers a full program featuring keynote speaker Bryan Alexander, senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), chair of the 2010 Horizon Report and author of The New Digital Storytelling, as well as panel presentations and Q&A with thought leaders from libraries around the country. Throughout the day, the industry’s leading vendors will showcase their latest innovations with presentations and webcasts throughout the show. And don’t forget to visit the Exhibit Hall for product demos and give-aways from our sponsors!

Plus, you can network with colleagues from across the nation and participate in our librarian moderated Twitter chat, all without leaving your office!

The Library Grants Center

Salem's Library Grants Center, a free web tool designed to help librarians everywhere—whatever their level of experience—navigate the world of library grants.

THE CHALLENGE
At a time when the word "library" is inseparable from the phrase "budget cuts," librarians need help finding help. So we scoured the web in search of free funding for libraries and discovered that the options extend far beyond national and state opportunities. Hundreds of grants are available to libraries of all types from local foundations, family trusts, small and large corporations, professional organizations, and the publishing community.

THE GOAL
Numerous web resources on grants already exist online. But most are general in scope. Those specific to libraries usually target a type of grant (e.g., professional association grants) or type of library (e.g., libraries in public schools). Our goal was to design a universal tool whose sole focus is library grants but with coverage that includes every type of funding available.

THE SOLUTION
The Library Grants Center is divided into three main sections:

National Library Grants
Search and browse grants and awards available to all libraries by category, purpose, deadline, and more.

State Library Grants
Use the clickable U.S. map to open up your state's page and get information on how public funds are used in your state as well as what local foundations support libraries in your city, county, or region.

Library Grants: How-To -- Read More

All 50 State Librarians Vote to Form Alliance With Open Library

All 50 State Librarians Vote to Form Alliance With Internet Archive’s Open Library

The Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) voted unanimously during a meeting held October 24-26 in Santa Fe, NM, to enter into a memorandum of understanding with the Internet Archive (IA) that will essentially make the state librarian in each state a point person for the Open Library’s lending program.

School Libraries: What's Now, What's Next, What's Yet to Come

School Libraries: What's Now, What's Next, What's Yet to Come
A crowdsourced collection of over 100 essays from around the world about trends in school libraries written by librarians, teachers, publishers, and library vendors. Edited by Kristin Fontichiaro and Buffy Hamilton. Foreword by R. David Lankes. Photographs by Diane Cordell.

Library Science: An ArtSpace Exhibit

Artspace is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition Library
Science
, conceived by New York-based curator Rachel Gugelberger. The exhibition
contemplates our personal, intellectual and physical relationships to the library, with a
focus on how these interactions are changing as libraries adapt to the digital world. From
its socio-cultural meaning to its architectural space and classification tools, the library
informs the methodology and practice of the artists in Library Science, presenting the
work of 17 artists in a variety of media including drawing, photography, sculpture,
installation, painting and web-based projects.

The e -- Read More

The Men of the Stacks Librarian Calendar

We know what people think: Dewey, glasses, shushing, books, hairbuns, Party Girl and card catalogs. Yes, we know what people think. We know that the American, library profession is approximately 80% White and 72% female; and we know that tens of thousands of librarians are expected to reach age 65 in the next 5 years. We also know that this is not us.

There is an entire population of professional librarians out there who disagree with the way the library profession is perceived in contemporary media outlets and in the historical consciousness of the American mind. Different people and different associations will use different means to try to change those perceptions. This is ours.

The website: http://menofthestacks.com/
To purchase: http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/204508
FB fan page: http://www.facebook.com/Men.of.the.Stacks

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