Announcements

Seeking performers for "Librarians Like Noise" at #ALA13

Do you make experimental music? Will you be at (or near) ALA Annual in Chicago this year? Then be a part of "Librarians Like Noise", a night dedicated to... well... librarians who like noise. We're looking for performers! If you think you might be interested, email Steve Kemple, Music Reference Librarian from the Cincinnati Public Library, at steven.kemple@cincinnatilibrary.org.

The event will most likely be on the evening of Monday July 1 at a yet-to-be-determined Chicago-area venue.

Librarian lego minifigs!

“Shhh!”

Books are just about the Librarian’s most favorite thing in the entire world. Reading them can take you on exciting adventures in far-off lands, introduce you to new friends and cultures, and let you discover poetry, classic literature, science fiction and much more. If only everybody loved to read as much as she does, the world would be a better place…and quieter, too!

The Librarian feels that it’s extremely important to treat a book with the proper respect. You should always use a bookmark instead of folding down the corner of the page. Take good care of the dust jacket, and don’t scribble in the margins. And above all else, never – ever – return it to the library late!

Amazon.com to Acquire Goodreads

SEATTLE--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar. 28, 2013-- Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN) today announced that it has reached an agreement to acquire Goodreads, a leading site for readers and book recommendations that helps people find and share books they love.

“Amazon and Goodreads share a passion for reinventing reading,” said Russ Grandinetti, Amazon Vice President, Kindle Content. “Goodreads has helped change how we discover and discuss books and, with Kindle, Amazon has helped expand reading around the world. In addition, both Amazon and Goodreads have helped thousands of authors reach a wider audience and make a better living at their craft. Together we intend to build many new ways to delight readers and authors alike.”

“Books – and the stories and ideas captured inside them – are part of our social fabric,” said Otis Chandler, Goodreads CEO and co-founder. “People love to talk about ideas and share their passion for the stories they read. I’m incredibly excited about the opportunity to partner with Amazon and Kindle. We’re now going to be able to move faster in bringing the Goodreads experience to millions of readers around the world. We’re looking forward to inspiring greater literary discussion and helping more readers find great books, whether they read in print or digitally.”

“I just found out my two favorite people are getting married,” said Hugh Howey, best-selling author of WOOL. “The best place to discuss books is joining up with the best place to buy books – To Be Read piles everywhere must be groaning in anticipation.”

Following the acquisition, Goodreads’s headquarters will remain in San Francisco, CA. Founded in 2007, Goodreads now has more than 16 million members and there are more than 30,000 books clubs on the Goodreads site. Over just the past 90 days, Goodreads members have added more than four books per second to the “want to read” shelves on Goodreads. -- Read More

Seed Library Opens in La Crosse, WI Library

The La Crosse Public Library in La Crosse, WI has just launched an heirloom seed library that will allow people to check out garden seeds to plant, grow, harvest and return to the library. "We are going to catalog them by genus and species eventually and have a catalog in a public area but that will be the second step. It's not hard to do but we need people that are committed to come in today and check out the seeds and come back and get them," said La Crosse Public Library Librarian Cindy Mischnick. The starter seeds are being provided by Seed Savers of Decorah, IA, the third largest heirloom seed repository in the world. The seed library is the first of its kind in Wisconsin.

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2013

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2013
The gold open-access model has given rise to a great many new online publishers. Many of these publishers are corrupt and exist only to make money off the author processing charges that are billed to authors upon acceptance of their scientific manuscripts.

There are two lists below. The first includes questionable, scholarly open-access publishers. Each of these publishers has a portfolio that ranges from just a few to hundreds of individual journal titles.

The second list includes individual journals that do not publish under the platform of any publisher — they are essentially independent, questionable journals

In both cases, we recommend that researchers, scientists, and academics avoid doing business with these publishers and journals. Scholars should avoid sending article submissions to them, serving on their editorial boards or reviewing papers for them, or advertising in them. Also, tenure and promotion committees should give extra scrutiny to articles published in these journals, for many of them include instances of author misconduct.

There are still many high-quality journals available for scholars to publish in, including many that do not charge author processing fees. An additional option is author self-archiving of articles in discipline-specific and institutional repositories.

The author is grateful to the many colleagues who have shared information about potential predatory publishers. Last year’s list included 23 publishers, and this year’s has over 225, evidence of the rapid growth in the number of predatory journals and publishers. This list will be updated throughout the year at the blog Scholarly Open Access, http://scholarlyoa.com.

The criteria for inclusion in the lists can be found here. The author’s email address is: jeffrey.beall@ucdenver.edu.

Reinventing the bookmobile in Texas with The Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library

The Billy Pilgrim Traveling Library is a Houston-area bookmobile created by two recent library school graduates, hitting the streets in 2013. It will be a traveling library built from personal libraries and donations, based on a rent/barter/trade system AND a physical resource maintained by professionals that is open to partnerships and collaborations with organizations like schools, libraries, museums, nonprofits, and local artists.

For more information and ways to get involved, check out the Boing Boing Library Lab write-up, the BTPL IndieGoGo campaign, the BPTL's blog, and the BPTL's social channels (@thebptl on Twitter and fb.me/theBPTL on Facebook).

Publishers And Google Reach Agreement

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) and Google today announced a settlement agreement that will provide access to publishers' in-copyright books and journals digitized by Google for its Google Library Project. The dismissal of the lawsuit will end seven years of litigation.

The agreement settles a copyright infringement lawsuit filed against Google on October 19, 2005 by five AAP member publishers. As the settlement is between the parties to the litigation, the court is not required to approve its terms.

The settlement acknowledges the rights and interests of copyright-holders. U.S. publishers can choose to make available or choose to remove their books and journals digitized by Google for its Library Project. Those deciding not to remove their works will have the option to receive a digital copy for their use.

{Thanks Peter!}

Computers in Libraries 2013 Proposals Due Tomorrow!

Proposals Due Tomorrow!! Be a part of Computers in Libraries 2013 Deadline is September 5!

Information Today, Inc., a key provider of technology conferences for more than twenty-five years with Internet Librarian and KMWorld, is pleased to announce the 28th annual Computers in Libraries – the most comprehensive North American conference and exhibition concentrating on all aspects of library technology. Our theme this year is Evolving in New Directions.

With small steps and big leaps libraries and information organizations are evolving in new and exciting ways. The fast changing technology and social trends are fueling this evolution in both exciting and scary ways. Computers, spaces and library and information services are all evolving in different, and mostly positive, directions. This year's Computers in Libraries theme focuses on mobile devices and electronic collections and how their use is changing the spaces and services in libraries. It focuses on the skills, competencies, and roles that are evolving to deal with all these changes in our communities, campuses and organizations. Opportunities abound but taking risks and trying new and different things is always a challenge. Computers in Libraries 2013 will share how leading edge libraries and information services are evolving, managing and excelling. It will provide lots of ideas and insights for jumpstarting your evolution strategies! -- Read More

The End Of Neat New Stuff

Marylaine wrote in with sad news on her loooooooong running "Neat New Things I Found This Week." This week was her final week of Neat New Things I Found This Week.... "Something I did there that I think may be especially useful is a calendar of some lesser known annual events that I think are wonderful opportunities for libraries programming, connecting them with their communities, and letting them know what the libraries have to offer."
The link is the usual: http://marylaine.com/neatnew.html

LJ editor in chief Francine Fialkoff leaves the publication

For Immediate Release

August 31, 2012

New York, NY—Today, Library Journal announced that editor-in-chief Francine Fialkoff is leaving LJ effective September 1. Fialkoff has had an extraordinary career at LJ spanning 35 years, with over 15 years at its helm (as editor and editor-in-chief). Under her leadership, LJ moved from a print magazine to a multiplatform entity.

Fialkoff’s work has benefitted libraries across the United States and beyond. Highlights of her career at LJ include being a driving force behind the pro bono restoration of the devastated Alvar Street branch following Hurricane Katrina. She was integral to launching the annual LJ “Movers & Shakers,” a coveted annual award that identifies up and coming stars in the library world, now boasting over 550 inductees. She helped put LJ on the map as a major player in library building and design, with, among other things, the launch of a biannual Library by Design tabloid as well as a popular Design Institute event series now in its 11th cycle. And she has been involved in the creation of awards, including Best Small Library in America Award, the LJ Teaching Award, and the new LibraryAware Award, as well as enhancing the impact of the annual Library of the Year and Librarian of the Year awards. She has also overseen the launch into important original research such as Patron Profiles; the integration of webcasts; and the launch of LJ’s widely read enewsletters. -- Read More

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