Announcements

Grant Opportunities For CollectionSpace

CollectionSpace is pleased to announce a mini-grant opportunity for new adopters, implementers, and community leaders.

Are you ready to implement and need some assistance? Would an additional set of hands help to guide you through the planning process?  Is there a project you have in mind that would build capacity in your community around CollectionSpace?  Are you looking to use CollectionSpace but don’t have access to a technical team?

Mini-grants of up to $7,500 for single institutions/collections and up to $25,000 for collaborations among organizations and/or collections are now available.

Questions? Email [email protected] or attend our November walkthrough, where we’ll answer any and all questions about the grant. More information about the walkthroughs can be found on our community calendar.

From Grant Opportunities | CollectionSpace

New LibraryBox Release! v2.1

Updates

This release brings with it some long-needed upgrades, including:

Multi-language support for the user interface and a dozen languages built-in
New CSS-styled file directory listings, including responsive design for tablets and smartphones
Even more hardware is now supported, including our least-expensive hardware ever, the GL-iNet router that lets you build a LibraryBox for less than $25.
DLNA support for playing media from your LibraryBox on your TV or other DLNA compatible device
An improved upgrade process for future code releases that means no more need to SSH into your LibraryBox to upgrade it
General stability and speed improvements that make using LibraryBox even better for everyone

From LibraryBox v2.1 | Pattern Recognition

2016 Call for Speakers Now Open! – Big Talk From Small Libraries

Big Talk From Small Libraries 2016 will be held on Friday, February 26, 2016 between 8:45 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. (CT) via the GoToWebinar online meeting service. Speakers will be able to present their programs from their own desktops. The schedule will accommodate speakers’ time-zones.

If you are interested in presenting, please submit your proposal by Friday, January 8, 2016. Speakers from libraries serving fewer than 10,000 people will be preferred, but presentations from libraries with larger service populations will be considered.

From 2016 Call for Speakers Now Open! – Big Talk From Small Libraries

NISO Releases a Set of Principles to Address Privacy of User Data in Library, Content-Provider, and Software-Supplier Systems

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published a set of consensus principles for the library, content-provider and software-provider communities to address privacy issues related to the use of library and library-related systems.  This set of principles developed over the past 8 months focus on balancing the expectations library users have regarding their intellectual freedoms and their privacy with the operational needs of systems providers. 
 
The NISO Privacy Principles, available at http://www.niso.org/topics/tl/patron_privacy/, set forth a core set of guidelines by which libraries, systems providers and publishers can foster respect for patron privacy throughout their operations.  The Principles outline at a high level basic concepts and areas which need to be addressed to support a greater understanding for and respect of privacy-related concerns in systems development, deployment, and user interactions.  The twelve principles covered in the document address the following topics: Shared Privacy Responsibilities; Transparency and Facilitating Privacy Awareness; Security; Data Collection and Use; Anonymization; Options and Informed Consent; Sharing Data with Others; Notification of Privacy Policies and Practices; Supporting Anonymous Use; Access to One’s Own User Data; Continuous Improvement and Accountability.
 
The Preamble of the Principles notes that, "Certain personal data are often required in order for digital systems to deliver information, particularly subscribed content. Additionally, user activity data can provide useful insights on how to improve collections and services. However, the gathering, storage, and use of these data must respect the trust users place in libraries and their partners. There are ways to address these operational needs while also respecting the user’s rights and expectations of privacy."
 
"Working collaboratively through a set of open meetings and discussion forums, a team of librarians, publishers and systems providers crafted these principles,” said Todd Carpenter, NISO's Executive Director.  “This fact distinguishes this effort from other privacy-related efforts in our community.  By working together to deeply grasp the foundational nature of respect for patron privacy among suppliers as well as to understand the operational needs and product development process among the library community, the team was able to come to a nuanced understanding of the related issues.  This joint effort allowed for the creation of a balanced set of principles, which achieve the common goal of providing the best possible user experience built from its core with respect for privacy.”
 
Organizations and individuals are encouraged to provide public comments on the NISO Privacy Principles, as well as register their support for the principles, on the NISO website.  Additional work in the coming year is envisioned to make these high-level principles operational for publishers, content-providers and software suppliers.
 

Library Acquires Robert Dawson’s Images of Public Libraries

The Library of Congress has acquired 681 photographs from "The Public Library: An American Commons," a photographic survey by Robert Dawson of public libraries in the United States. The photographs significantly expand the Library’s holdings that describe the American public library—as architecture, community spaces and a reflection of the contemporary social landscape.

"Robert Dawson’s extensive survey provided the perfect opportunity for the Library of Congress to represent the public library’s role in the 21st century. His photographs also offer a fascinating comparison to our interior and exterior views of libraries newly built at the start of the 20th century," said Helena Zinkham, director for Collections and Services at the Library of Congress.

The Dawson collection is the largest acquisition of library photography by the Library of Congress since the early 1900s.

From Library Acquires Robert Dawson’s Images of Public Libraries | News Releases - Library of Congress

The Active Librarian Journal Launch | Call for Papers!

<em>The Active Librarian</em> has published its first issue! Peer-reviewed and practical, <em>TAL</em> publishes the programs, initiatives, and services of public librarians. It aims to house the best practices from which librarians can draw inspiration.

LYRASIS Second Friday Presents: Open Parks for the People

The session was so interesting that LYRASIS is bringing this presentation to you as a part of our Second Friday series on November 13 at 12:30 EST.  Please join us as Chris Vinson and Rachel Wittmann from Clemson University speak about Open Parks Network.  This session is free for LYRASIS members. To register, click!

From LYRASIS Second Friday Presents: Open Parks for the People | LYRASIS NOW

Journal of Library Innovation Vol 6, No 1 (2015)

Table of Contents
Feature Articles
Producing Tutorials With Digital Professionals: Primary Sources, Pirates, and Partners PDF
Shelley Arlen, Missy Clapp, Cindy Craig 1-21
Academic Libraries and Innovation: A Literature Review PDF
Curtis Brundy 22-39
Dissertation to Book: Successful Open Access Outreach to Graduate Students PDF
Diane Gurman, Marta Brunner 40-59

From Vol 6, No 1 (2015)

Cites & Insights June 2015 (15:6) available

Cites & Insights 15:6 (June 2015) is
now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6.pdf

The print-oriented two-column version is 24 pages long. For those
reading online or on an e-device, or who wish to follow links in the
issue, a 46-page single-column 6x9" version is available at
http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i6on.pdf

The June 2015 issue includes:
The Front: Making It Easy, Making It Hard: A Personal Note on
Counting Articles pp. 1-4

This oddity offers some notes on OA publishers and
journals that make it easier--or harder--than usual to find out how
many articles appear in a journal over a given year, from the utter
simplicity of MDPI, SciELO and j-stage to the utter...well, read the
article.

Intersections: Who Needs Open Access, Anyway? pp. 4-24

Noting and discussing a range of commentaries by people
who are either "I'm all for OA, but..." (where the
but is the most important word in that phrase) or
discussing ways in which others attempt to undermine OA: clearing out
two years of "oa-anti" tags.

 

Reading Rainbow Welcome to Reading Rainbow | Best Reading Apps for Kids

Introducing the re-imagined Reading Rainbow experience, featuring an unlimited library of acclaimed children's books and video field trips.
https://www.readingrainbow.com/

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