Censorship

Commemorating the Infamous Island Trees Book Ban of \'76

From Newsday, someone has written an article about the famous book ban of \'76 that resulted in a Supreme Court decision limiting the authority of school officials to ban material on the basis that they find it personally offensive. more...

Censorship in wake of terror attacks

stuart yeates writes \"
The BBC is carrying a story about how ``information about hazardous chemicals\'\' is being pulled from websites in the name of national security. There appears to be very little assessment of whether this censorship could be counterproductive, in that it lowers the threat visability and thus preparedness. It also fails to mention that many of the pages are cached on Google\" and similar engines.
\"

A tale of two Harry Potters in Jacksonville FL

The Associated Press reports that Duval County School District has decided to require a permission slip signed by a parent before any student can check out Harry Potter books. But that\'s not the end of this story... -- Read More

No Plague of Banned Books

entertainmentnewsdaily.com is running a Story that says never have more books by more authors on more subjects been more readily available to more people, and Banned Books Week is ALA hype.


\"In short, the fanatics and book-burners against whom Banned Books Week is meant to keep us vigilant are mostly parents who raise questions about their kids\' reading material. In the world according to the American Library Association, moms and dads are the enemy.\"

Focus on the Family attacks ALA\'s banned books week

stuart yeates writes \"
CNS news is carrying an article about how Focus on the Family is calling the ALA\'s Banned books week hypocrisy. There\'s also an article on the Focus on the Family web site. \"

From the story:
\"The issue, however, is really just a matter of who gets to choose the books. When librarians or the American Library Association, for example, decide what is appropriate for library shelves, it is called selection. \"

Librarians pushing to get \'Forever\' back on shelves

Another book banning story. This time from the Chicago Daily
Herald.

Anna Johnson writes:
\"Two years after Eastview Middle School librarian Joan Devine lost
a close and heated battle to reverse Elgin Area School District U-46\'s
1997 decision to ban Judy Blume\'s \"Forever,\" she\'s back on the
battlefield again. But this time, Devine will not be fighting the
district\'s book banning alone.\"
Full Story

Radio giant encouraging censorship?

This article on Slate.com discusses a \'no-play\' list of songs distributed by Clear Channel Communications in reaction to last week\'s attack. Clear Channel owns and programs air time on over 1000 radio stations in the United States. Metallica\'s \'Seek and Destroy\' is on the list, but so is John Lennon\'s \'Imagine.\' Should this be an individual station decision? Does the company have the right to do this since they are a private, rather than public, entity? Should we tolerate this in light of last week\'s attack? This is an important issue with many intriguing facets. Check out the song list and see what you think.

Sex book getting close look

This One is worth it just for that headline.

17 members of the Anchorage School District\'s Controversial Issues Review Committee (sounds like a fun bunch), have reviewed the book \"It\'s Perfectly Normal\" and will hear testimony from two parents who want the book off school library shelves.

\"I need to operate in the best interest of all of my students,\" Oliver said. \"Librarians respect the parents\' right to be the ultimate authority in what (their children) are exposed to. That\'s one of our unbendable laws. But that right to control what their child is exposed to only extends to their child. And there are as many parents out there as there are opinions, and I need to serve all of them.\"

Checking Out Salinger

Howard Bagwell wants to pull \"The Catcher in the Rye\" off the bookshelves in school libraries, he thinks it\'s inappropriate for teens, unfortunatly he is a School Board member in South Carolina. Bagwell checked out one copy of \"The Catcher in the Rye\" at Summerville High School\'s library last week. He checked another out at Fort Dorchester High on Wednesday. He plans to buy them from the schools instead of returning them.

\"It is a filthy, filthy book,\" Bagwell said. \"It has 269 some odd pages or so, and if you took out all the (profanity), the sarcasm, the mockery of old people, the mockery of women and decent people, you would get to read about 10 minutes\' worth. I can\'t figure out for the life of me why it is considered an important book.\"

I honestly can\'t figure out why it\'s important, or why someone would hate it, either.
Full Story from charleston.net, with props going to Mefi.

County to address sex books

From Alaska to Florida sex education books are upsetting
adults. This in from the Star Banner in Ocala, FL.\"Debate
over two
sexually explicit books geared toward young people has prompted
county commissioners to arrange a panel discussion designed to
ease perceived tension concerning the Marion County Library\'s
collection which includes both books.\" The books are
\"It\'s Perfectly Normal\" and \"Deal With It\". Full Story

\"It\'s Perfectly Normal\" was also challenged in Anchorage, AK as
posted in this
earlier story
.

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