Are graphic novels next?

Someone passed along
on a [not the largest] public library in
Quebec being forced by the city council to remove 180
comic books from the regular stacks in Hull\'s library.
They are stored in a separate room accessible only by
employees. Hull\'s city council passed the motion in
response to public complaints that the library carried
pornographic material, that was accessible by children.

\"The books were originally on shelves right next
to the main desk, in the direct line of vision from the
counter. They were always visible to us. We would
know if children were taking books from those
particular shelves.\"


The Problem With Community Standards

Ever vigilant James Nimmo passed along word on The movie
Fat Girl being banned in Ontario because it
violates \"community standards.\"

First it was delayed, refused for a second time to release it, while the director says he Is Stupified, and People Are Not Happy Aboot This.
It may help them here though, as newspaper advertisements in Chicago, Philadelphia and Seattle, where Fat Girl opens on the weekend, will carry the words \"Banned in Canada\" in their copy, not a bad Idea, eh?


Reisman bans Mein Kampf from Chapters and Indigo

Cabot writes \"Heather Reisman, chairwoman and CEO of Indigo Books and Music Inc., has ordered all copies of Mein Kampf pulled from the shelves of Chapters and Indigo bookstores and deleted from the company\'s on-line ordering service.

Full Story \"

\"We consider it hate literature,\" she said. \"With freedom of expression, the line is drawn on hate literature. It\'s a corporate decision. It\'s what we stand for. It\'s our point of view.\"


Un-depositing material

Mary Minow passed along This Story on a recent government order that caught some local librarians by surprise and made the people who spend their professional lives providing information to others a bit uneasy.

The Government Printing Office ordered the libraries to destroy public information — specifically, a CD-ROM on reservoirs and dams prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey. The reason for the order: national security

\"“In some cases, removal of information may be justified,” he said. “The problem is it’s happening on an ad hoc basis with no criteria of what should be removed. In some cases, the agencies [are] forgetting the reasons the information was disclosed in the first place.”


The Post-September 11 Environment

ombwatch.org is maintaining A List of changes in public access to government information since the September 11 terrorist attacks. This list is updated on an ongoing basis. New additions will be posted to the top of the list.


Rising Fears That What We Do Know Can Hurt Us

Another great submission from Hermit.Hermit ;-) writes \" The LAtimes is reporting Reporting on the GPO\'s order to have government records destroyed at Federal Depository Libraries. The article also mentions the removal of info from fed and FAS.org websites and the reduction of F.O.I.A. requests granted. The article reports that \"while documents have been pulled before because they contained mistakes or were outdated, this was the first time in memory that documents were destroyed because of security concerns, said Francis Buckley, superintendent of documents for the printing office.\"
Lively discussion Slashdot.\"

Fiona points to discussions on Kuro5in as well, and adds \"It is incredibly disturbing that a government agency has the power to order libraries to do this. \"


Yahoo! for free speech

Ready for the World writes \"A Federal Judge ruled on WEdnesday, November 7, 2001 that the French courts cannot impose regulations or restrictions on U.S. based Yahoo. The French had argued that since the internet sites can be viewed in France that they must follow the ban on talk and sale of anything Nazi related. The U.S. Federal Court ruled that the \"United States Constitution\'s protections of free speech trumped a French order requiring Yahoo to remove Nazi materials from its Web site\". Find out more in the NYTimes \"


Anti-war free speech challenged in West Virginia

Val writes \"A West Virginia high school student was told by school officials and the court system she couldn\'t wear anti-war themed t-shirts to school, nor would she be allowed to form an \"anarchy club.\" Girl and her mother expect to pursue case.
Read more: At Salon \"


Government Responses to 9/11

Lee Hadden writes : \"The OMB Watch, which helps promote accountability in government, has
listed some of the actions different federal agencies have taken after the
terrorist incidents of September 11th. For example, many digital maps have
been pulled from the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and interactive
websites maintained by the International Nuclear Safety Regulatory Center
that showed the locations of nuclear reactors have been removed.
Read more about it.\"


Catcher Gets to Stay on the Shelves

A panel of community members has determined the fate of JD Salinger\'s \"Catcher in the Rye.\" The verdict; it will remain on the Dorcester School District (SC) library\'s shelves. A school board member was campaigning to have the book removed. This is his second attempt, and he didn\'t fair any better the first time around. more... from The Charleston Post & Courier. ...I really must make it a point to read this book just to see what all the fuss is about...



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