Censorship

Parents' protest raises censorship questions

There is a certain irony in this case and all others like it. Now every teenager in Guilford County knows there is a prurient title out there they might actually want to read. We predict circulation of “The Handmaiden’s Tale’ will rise dramatically. It is not an easy read, but it might lead some to explore other titles by a well-respected author who has things to say to young people, and indeed others.

Finally, it is presumed that the complainants have read the book – not the odd passage, but actually read it. And thus be willing to publicly respond in the affirmative to the question, “Have you read this book,” if asked.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #216

This week's episode mysteriously dispenses with Profile America so that attention can be paid to the matter of Diplomats Dancing in Dubai in December...which is to say, we talk about some ramifications of the upcoming World Conference on International Telecommunications.

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This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

Open Road Media Video on Banned Books Week

Banned Book Trading Card Exhibit at the Lawrence KS Library

Check out this deck of banned book cards and let us know what your library is doing to celebrate BANNED BOOKS WEEK.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #214

This week's episode features a chat with Dan Lynch of Sixgun Productions in Liverpool about changes in the UK library world relative to the UK government reviewing the possibility of e-book lending there. Madam Producer also discusses a new report by Freedom House about Internet Freedom in the context of this week being Banned Books Week.

Download here (MP3) (ogg), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. Support and subsistence items for the production team can be purchased and sent from here.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

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Tintin OUT, then IN at Swedish Library

Swedish News (in English): Following a storm of media criticism, officials at the Kulturhuset library in Stockholm have reversed their decision to remove Tintin comic books from its shelves, saying the move happened "too fast".

"The decision happened too fast," Kulturhuset head Eric Sjöström and the organization's artistic director, Behrang Miri, said in a statement released late Tuesday morning.

The reversal comes after a report in Tuesday's Dagens Nyheter (DN) newspaper in which Miri said the library planned to remove Tintin comics from its shelves.

“The image the Tintin books give of Africans is Afro-phobic, for example. Africans are a bit dumb, while Arabs sit on flying carpets and Turks smoke water pipes,” he told the paper.

But after criticism of the move erupted in Swedish media on Monday morning, Miri changed his stance.

"I wanted to highlight an opinion piece about issues of discrimination, but realize now that it's wrong to ban books," Miri said in a statement.

However, Kulturhuset head Sjöström applauded Miri for prompting a discussion about discrimination.

"The issues of discrimination, equality and norms continue to be debated and discussed," Sjöström said in a statement.

Balkanizing The Internet

Reporters Without Borders takes a look at new frontiers in carrying out censorship being undertaken in response to an infamous YouTube video.

Underground library stands up for books

From the opinion page of Milwaukee's JSOnline,

"Recently, I met Adriana McCleer, a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Information Studies. Aside from being a graduate student, McCleer is a former librarian from Racine. She's also a visionary.

McCleer wants to build a library in our great city. But not just any ol' library. She wants Milwaukee to have an underground library of books banned in Tucson, Ariz. If she succeeds, and I hope she does, the library will be one of many popping up across the nation."

British charity calls for '50 Shades of Grey' book burning

A British charity has called for a burning of the book "50 Shades of Grey" by E.L. James. Wearside Women in Need, which focuses on domestic violence, has asked readers to drop off books for a planned bonfire on Nov. 5.

"I do not think I can put into words how vile I think this book is," Wearside Women's Clare Phillipson told the BBC, "and how dangerous I think the idea is that you get a sophisticated but naive, young women and a much richer, abusive older man who beats her up and does some dreadful things to her sexually."

Why should Amazon be our taste and decency policeman?

The Guardian has an interesting story on requiring Amazon.com to censor the materials they sell. "Why should Amazon be our taste and decency policeman?The online retailer has been criticised for profiting from ebooks featuring terror and violence. No one should tell us what to read."

See: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/jun/26/amazon-taste-decency-policeman-ebooks-te...

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