Movies

Filipino Star Plays Librarian

Vilma Santos is arguably the Filipino equivalent of Meryl Streep, except Santos has been a box office draw for a longer period. Shirley, the character played by Santos in In My Life, apparently has two distinct facets – the traditional and old-fashioned librarian and the modern and transformed one in New York City. According to Santos, "The old Shirley doesn’t like computers. She doesn’t even like her library computerized." Her eventual transformation, courtesy of her gay son and his partner, seems to imply a correlation between her acceptance of her son's lifestyle and the new technology she learns to embrace. More...

Whither Redbox? Hollywood studios are conflicted

Hollywood studios are split over Redbox, the $1-per-night DVD rental kiosk company: They could supply it with cheap wholesale discs and ride its massive growth, or starve it in the hopes of preserving higher-priced purchases.

News Corp.'s 20th Century Fox fell on the side of starvation this week, joining General Electric Co.'s Universal Pictures, whose withholding of discs prompted a lawsuit.

On the flip side, Sony Corp.'s movie division signed a five-year deal just last month to supply Redbox. As part of the deal, Redbox would get discs more cheaply but would have to destroy copies after their rental lives ended rather than sell them as "previously viewed" for $7 apiece, as it had done in the past.

Full piece here.

Not Your Average Librarian

Many people are happily married to librarians, but it is the fate of the character Clare in Audrey Niffenegger’s The Time Traveler’s Wife to be married to librarian (and time traveler) Henry De Tamble.

Here are a few clips from the upcoming movie, opening August 14.

Keeping Up With Teens at the New Potter Movie

Anastasia posts on Y Pulse Blog: "At 37, apart from the sprinkling of parents accompanying their teens, I think we may have been the oldest people in the theater. My husband seemed proud that he stayed awake while the pierced, teen guy sitting next to him crashed midway through the movie. I would say the average age of the audience was 16-17 — "Harry Potter teens" — who have, like the stars of the films, grown up reading the books and watching the movies.

In a way I was jealous of these teens for having such a beloved series of books and being able to experience them on so many platforms — the movies, online fan communities and next year, the amusement park. Even though I read fantasy as a teen (A Wrinkle In Time, The Hobbit), there was no well-oiled multi-media/multi-platform machine in place to create a universe on the scale of Harry Potter. -- Read More

Keeping It Local

Little film by Jay O'Berski (www.littlegreenpig.com) focusing on how important it is to support your local bookstore.

Just Around the Corner asks: "Shopping on the web and consider yourself "green"? Think again chum! You may just be breeding an ecological disaster in your own backyard..." Hokey archival footage mixed with a few good live action segments make it an enjoyable two minute movie with a message.

TV's "The Librarian" a Winner

The best in sci fi, fantasy, and horror were honored last night at the 35th annual Saturn Awards in Los Angeles. THE LIBRARIAN 3: CURSE OF THE JUDAS CHALICE (with actor Noah Wyle, the character of librarian/archivist) brought home the honors in the field of TV.

Here's a photo of him doing the typically challenging work of a librarian:

More from IF Magazine.

Graphic Novel 'Lunch Lady' to Become a Movie with Amy Poehler

From my friends over at The Hollywood Reporter:

Universal has picked up "Lunch Lady," a children's graphic novel series written and illustrated by Jarrett Krosoczka, with Amy Poehler attached to star. Poehler will executive produce along with the Gotham Group's Ellen Goldsmith-Vein set to produce. Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern are penning the adaptation.

The "Lady" series, the first of which will be unveiled at the end of July by Knopf Books for Young Readers, centers on a mild-mannered school cafeteria server who secretly dishes out helpings of justice as she and her assistant investigate wrongdoings. The books also feature three kids who try to figure out her double life.


The titles include "Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians" and "Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute," both of which are due this summer. "Lunch Lady and the Author Visit Vendetta" is scheduled to be released in December and "Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown" is set for summer 2010.

Librarian as Anti-Hero

Here we go again with another "mousy librarian" stereotype. But this one is covered in blood and the leading character in a cult horror movie.

"All About Evil" is a wicked black comedy set in the world of a horror movie; it's about a so-called mousy librarian (Natasha Lyonne) who inherits her father's beloved but failing old movie house. In order to save the family business she discovers her inner serial killer - and a legion of rabid gore fans - when she starts turning out a series of grisly shorts. What her fans don't realize yet is that the murders in the movies are all too real!

The film was shot entirely in San Francisco and was born, nurtured, and birthed in the cult film underground. Writer / Director / Producer Joshua Grannell is also known as alter-ego and Midnight Mass impresario Peaches Christ. The movie is presently casting extras in S.F. if you're interested...

QUESTION:

If you had a paperback-sized device that allowed you watch any movie or show on demand, anywhere, for free, would you still read books?

Indy Film About An Art Collecting Librarian & Her Husband

The film is "Herb and Dorothy" by Megumi Sasaki. It's a charming documentary about a married couple, who despite modest means — Herb was a postal clerk and Dorothy was a reference librarian at the Brooklyn Public Library — amass one of the most important contemporary art collections ever.

In 1992, the Vogels made headlines that shocked the art world: their entire collection was moved to the National Gallery of Art, the vast majority of it as an outright gift to the institution. Many of the works they acquired at modest prices appreciated so significantly that their collection became worth several million dollars, yet the Vogels never sold a single piece to breakdown the collection. Included were the works of Sol LeWitt, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Tuttle and Chuck Close.

Herb and Dorothy still live in the same Manhattan apartment today- with 19 turtles, lots of fish, one cat -once completely emptied, now refilled again with piles of artworks.

Synopsis and trailer of the film tol be screened at the Little Rock Film Festival (among others); more about this fascinating couple and the award-winning film at the Herb and Dorothy website.

Syndicate content