8 Kick-Ass Movies You Didn't Know Were Based on Books

8 Kick-Ass Movies You Didn't Know Were Based on Books: Nobody reads books these days. After all, what's the point? There's no way some novel could ever kick as much ass as, say, watching Sylvester Stallone punch a guy's head off his shoulders. Or, could it? Believe it or not, a lot of the most kick-ass movies were adapted from kick-ass books. No, we're not just talking Lord of the Rings here. We're talking about ...


Ridley Scott Refines His Vision of 'Blade Runner'

All Things Considered, December 17, 2007 · Few modern American films have achieved the cult status enjoyed by Ridley Scott's Blade Runner. But the picture's path to film legend was anything but straight, with bitter disagreement between director Scott and Warner Brothers about the film's original cut.

A flop when it premiered in 1982, Blade Runner stars Harrison Ford as Deckard, a cop who hunts renegade human-like androids — known as replicants — in a futuristic Los Angeles. It features a happy ending with a voiceover that explains how Deckard "gets the girl" — who is actually a replicant named Rachael.

Ten years later, in 1992, Ridley Scott released a director's cut of the film, in which he dropped the happy ending forced on him by the studio in 1982.

And now, 25 years after the original release, the director gets the final say. He has re-cut the original film and brushed up the visuals and sound quality to create the picture he had always intended.

Listen or read the entire story at the NPR website.


YA Experts Address Golden Compass Question

In a brief piece in last Sunday's Lexington (Kentucky) Herald-Leader, journalist Cheryl Truman interviewed Anita Silvey, author of 500 Great Books for Teens, and university professor Mary Landrum about the Golden Compass brouhaha:

[Silvey] views the fracas over The Golden Compass as a cautionary tale about why writers in the children's and young adult book industry shy away from references to religion and spirituality: Individual perceptions of what it's appropriate to write about religion vary as widely as readers' perceptions of what God is.

"If a person's vision of God isn't your version of God, it begins to get books pulled from libraries," Silvey says.

Movies better than the books that spawned them

A Short List of (as the title suggests) Movies better than the books that spawned them, according to the San Diego Union Tribune. Includes “The Graduate”, “The Godfather”, “Carrie” and several others


Cinema saver

David Packard and the Library of Congress' film preservation efforts: Cinema Saver, Following the long effort to get the facility built, Packard's attention has turned now to a new project, a storage facility for the UCLA archives in Southern California's Santa Clarita. This will be another monumental facility to protect the actual stuff dreams are made of, the physical components of cinema.

Actress Jessica Biel Options Film Rights To Book With Librarian Heroine

Biel says she was smitten with Megan Abbott's book Die a Little, and it is likely she will play the blond femme fatale with the dark past, rather than the other protagonist, a seemingly normal librarian. Hollywood is unwilling to pay for a period piece set and costumes, so the adaptation will bring the Los Angeles local into the modern era, rather than 1954, as it was originally.


Interview with Hollywood Librarian Director, Ann Seidl

Sept 27, 2007 Wisconsin Public Radio talk show host Kathleen Dunn talks with the maker of the new documentary, "The Hollywood Librarian" The film not only dispels stereotypes, but also presents libraries and literature as the bedrock of civilization. Guest: Ann Seidl, writer and director, The Hollywood Librarian: A Look at Librarians through Film. The interview will be available as an archived broadcast starting Sept.28.


Sssshhhhh! Documentary focuses on librarians...

Though the headline at The Journal Times On-line leaves something to be desired, The Hollywood Librarian got a good write up: "Sssshhhhh! Documentary focuses on librarians in films, and makes the case for libraries as the seat of civilization"
The review includes an interview with Ann Seidl. You can see where It's Playing at her site.

The Hollywood Librarian Visits Indiana

And critic Frank Gray of the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette reviews it.

From his column: "The focus of [Ann Seidl's 'The Hollywood Librarian'] will undoubtedly please real-life librarians, such as Lynn Hoffman, who has been with the Allen County Public Library for 11 years.

Yeah, she said, sometimes she does take the stereotype a bit personally. She wears her hair in a bun once in a while, and she wears glasses, too.

But, she adds, she likes to think of herself as a relatively young person and sort of cool. She was a cheerleader in high school, so she can't be too dull, and she's not a spinster. She's married. And on the day of the interview, when a gathering of senior citizens was making an incredible racket in the library, not once did she shush anyone.

"People say, 'You gotta have a degree to do this?' It hurts a little," Hoffman says. Most of what I do the public isn't aware of.

Katie Jacobs, who has been a librarian in the young-adults section in Fort Wayne, has been a librarian for six years.

"When people come up and say, God, what a boring job, I just think, 'Oh, go away.' "

Her job is way cooler than the jobs most people will ever have, she says.

But there's still that stereotype, that librarians main responsibility is protecting books from people and shushing visitors to the library. It's still widespread.

"I think it's funny," Jacobs said. "Kids come up and whisper, and I can't hear them."

Check out the film trailer on YouTube.

Award-Winning DVD About Sikhs "Mistaken Identity" Now Available

Filmmaker Sarkar writes "Have you heard about our successful screenings of DVD "MISTAKEN IDENTITY: Discovering Sikh Neighbors". Winner of three first prize awards for is the first film produced for mainstream America and part of a series of "getting to know the cultural and religious backgrounds of multicultural ethnic minority neighbors" in today's pluralistic society.

The 40-minute DVD documentary film is hosted by 22-year old Amanda Gesine, discovering her Sikh neighbors after 9/11 for the first time. She never had a Sikh friend in school or college and felt that racial profiling starts with ignorance and fear.

Visit our website, Cultural Diversity for more information where you can review three minutes of the film via streaming video.

DVDs are available for institutional Library Distribution $250.00 (copy of DVD or VHS, including written material/questionnaire, reviews) for the classroom and auditorium teaching of ethnic media, multicultural communications, divinity and comparative religions, modern and Asian anthropology, South Asian studies, human rights, tolerance, racial equality, etc. recommended for the attention of the Librarian.
  We have requests for screenings of MISTAKEN IDENTITY-A 9/11 Story as "A Celebration of Cultural Diversity" for mainstream Americans, Canadian and British viewers. Especially, in places where there are large communities of Sikhs.



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