Children

Beyond the Caldecott winner's circle, severeal worthy works

"Win the Caldecott medal, which the American Library Association has been awarding annually since 1938 for ''the most distinguished picture book for children,'' and you join the august company of artists such as Robert McCloskey, Ludwig Bemelmans, Barbara Cooney, Maurice Sendak, and Margot Zemach."

"This year's winner is Eric Rohmann, for ''My Friend Rabbit,'' a merry tale of a well-meaning, bad-luck rabbit who brings chaos as he tries to retrieve his little mouse friend's airplane, which he'd sent loop-the-looping into a treetop. The text is suitably spare, and in the manner of Sendak's great ''Where the Wild Things Are'' (but without the nuance), words disappear entirely in the wild-action middle pages. The idiosyncratic ''Not to worry'' is repeated thrice, thus accounting for 11 percent of the pages' 80 words. The book will not win a literary award."

"The illustrations, either wood or lino prints, are fun, funny, and generous in spirit. It's a rollicking nice book. That's about it." (from The Boston Globe)

Parents may receive right to know titles in FL

News From Florida where a measure in the Senate would allow parents to learn the titles of overdue books checked out of libraries by their kids.

Confidentiality laws currently prevent libraries from disclosing to parents what materials their children had borrowed, even though the parent may be responsible for the fines if the books are overdue.

The bill (SB 192) would allow parents of children younger than 16 to learn the titles of overdue materials checked out by their children. The Florida Library Association supports the change, which could reach the full Senate as early as today.

Online full-text library for children

Luiza Dini writes: "This is an NPR story of the International Children's Digital Library, a full-text website of children's literature, both older (Alice in Wonderland) and newer titles (Axle the Freeway Cat) from around the world."

Lawmakers want to open book on children's overdue volumes

"When Daniel Webster was told one of hischildren had an overdue library book, the state lawmaker tried to find out the title, just like most parents would, so he couldtrack it down and return it."

"He needed the name becausethe book was mixed in with scores of other titles at the Webster household, where everyone has their own library card and likes to read."

"But even the influential Republican lawmaker couldn't pry the information out of Orange County librarians."

"They would say, 'We can't tell what the name of it is,' " Webster, a state senator and former speaker of the Florida House, recalled of the exchange he hadabout five years ago, when all six of hischildren were still at home. "It was a nightmare." (from The Orlando Sentinel)

Expert: Read to kids, it pays

Charlotte.com has This One on Jim Trelease, the nationally known literacy advocate.
He says the most important thing you can do for a child, aside from a hug, is "Read aloud to him, from crib through adolescence." Despite overwhelming evidence that reading aloud to youngsters is enormously beneficial, Trelease says, only 39 percent of parents with children younger than 3 read to them daily. Why?

"There's not enough pain involved," the author said in a recent interview from his home in Springfield, Mass. "Many parents subscribe to the Vince Lombardi approach to learning -- no pain, no gain; the medicine can't do any good unless it hurts going down. It's so much fun, reading to your children, that you don't think it's doing any good."

Mr. Rogers Dead at 74

From MSN Entertainment News...
\"Fred Rogers, who gently invited millions of children to be his neighbor as host of the public television show \"Mister Rogers\' Neighborhood\" for more than 30 years, died of cancer early Thursday. He was 74.\"
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Children's Books of the Early Soviet Era

bob Cox sent in This Neat Exhibit from the Rare Books and Special Collections Division of the McGill University Libraries.
They pulled from a collection of more than 350 Soviet children's books published in the 1920s and 30s and which are remarkable for their original aesthetic quality, linguistic variety and thematic diversity.

What's so great about Caldecott and Newbery?

"Faced with rows and rows of children's books at the library or bookstore, many parents are grateful for the "seal of approval," a gold sticker that indicates a book has won an award."

"But does that mean the book is really right for your child? Not necessarily. A look inside the awards may help you the next time you're hunting for a great book for your child." (from The Freelance Star)

Kids are Craving for Books In India

An Interesting Story from India, by Vijay Rana, says books have yet to become a part of Indian life. He quotes writer Anita Desai once saying on the British TV, \"No Indians are not book reading people.\"
He goes on to say that in developed countries book reading is a part of essential curriculum. Book reading children have a better and quicker grasp of issues, they also have improved writing and communication skills, that are so vital for overall success in life.

Study says boys do read, they just don\'t read books

Gary Deane sent over This One that says Teachers should allow boys to bring Pokémon trading cards into the classroom, let them go on Internet chat rooms and encourage them to relate school texts to television shows such as the Simpsons.
The problem may be that they are simply bored with the conventional curriculum. While they are less interested in fiction or traditional literature than girls are, they read more on the Internet and memorize vast amounts of detailed material from games or stories they read in the newspaper, the research showed.

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