Children

Making Room for Readers

From The Millions, an excellent article by Steve Himmer:

One recent morning, my almost four year old daughter started crying out of the blue. I asked her what was wrong, and she wailed, “I don’t have a library card!” So with a proud paternal bibliophile’s heart swollen in my chest, I strapped her into her car seat and we set off for the library in search of a library card and — at her request — in search of Tintin books like those I’d told her were my favorite stories at the library when I was young.

We went first to the branch library in our end of town, a small, round building with walls almost entirely of glass. All those windows, and the books behind them, make it look pretty inviting, and we parked our car in the lot and I held my daughter’s hand as she skipped to the door, bubbling over with excitement. Unfortunately, it was closed; I’d known municipal budget cuts had reduced the hours of all library branches, but I’d thought that only meant it was closed on Fridays. Instead, it meant this branch — and all others, apart from the main library downtown — were open only a couple of hours four afternoons through the week. No mornings, no evenings, no weekends.

The case for raunchy teen lit

A study warns parents about sex in YA novels, but these books can educate -- and spark a passion for reading

Article at Salon.com:
http://www.salon.com/life/teenagers/index.html?story=/mwt/feature/2011/07/28/ya

Mother wins appeal to have 'poo poo head' book removed from school library

The poo poo hit the fan for Texan Tammy Harris when she realised her son, 6, was suspended from school for saying a phrase that could be found in one of the school's library books.
Mrs Harris filed a complaint with the Brown Elementary School to have a book removed from the library shelves.
The book, 'The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby' contained the phrase 'poo poo head.'

Doctors prescribe regular library visits

Doctors prescribe regular library visits

Children in Kitsap County could get a recommendation to visit their local library at their next well-child checkup.

Kitsap Regional Library is working with health clinics and the nonprofit organization Reach Out and Read to promote early literacy this summer through a program called Libraries Are Doctor-Recommended.

Read more: http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2011/jul/13/doctors-prescribe-regular-library-visits/#ixzz1S5g...

School Librarians 'Put Away Their Inside Voices' to Object to Cuts

From the Huffington Post, a look at several states and cities that are facing cuts of school librarians, and how each place is responding...most are responding LOUDLY.

Today's librarians do more than collect and distribute books. Many hold masters degrees, are able to provide resources to both students and teachers, and are often referred to as "media specialists" to reflect their work in assisting students with 21st century technology.

Unfortunately, the work they do is largely behind the scenes and, as Oregon Live reports, parents, education officials, and the public are often unaware of the impact they have on student success. "That's always been the bane of our profession," said Susan Stone, president-elect of the Oregon Association of School Libraries. "We've got to shout about what we do."

Library advocates in Texas did more than shout at a rally held to raise awareness in April. Hundreds of supporters of the Texas Library Association beat drums outside the state capital, demanding that funding for libraries to be restored.

The School Library Journal reports that Carol Heinsdorf, President of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians (APSL), is actively campaigning to create awareness about librarian importance in Philadelphia.

More from Huff Post.

Back to Basics in Columbus Ohio

Readers of all ages will dig out their red capes at the Whitehall branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library as they dive into adventure during this year's summer reading program, "Be a Hero -- Read."

From easy-to-master magic to teen gaming and turtles, children will find a litany of fun activities to help them get excited about reading.
Just look around the library -- Captain Read is everywhere.

Kris Hickey, the Whitehall branch children's manager, said this year's summer reading program is going back to its roots and focusing solely on reading. "We've just gone back to the literacy part of it," she said, "and this is a very literacy-based program."

No longer can participants earn credit for playing an online activity or attending one of the branch's many programs. What they will get credit for, though, is tackling a good book.

"I think as an organization, we decided literacy is really our main focus," said Hickey. "We look at getting everyone to read, then we work at keeping them focused and interested so they are ready for the next level when school starts."

More from Columbus Local News.

Rescuing Reading: It's Not Shoe Shopping

Over at Rescuing Reading, a new blog where a children's librarian attempts to bring some common sense and passion for literature back into the world of children's reading, the blogger continues her discussion of the dangers and pitfalls of enslavement to Lexile scores, with some commentary on the first 90 seconds or so of Metametrics' online promotional video about its Lexile scoring system. Among other trenchant observations:

Writers Write About Censorship

Excerpt from "Places I Never Meant To Be" Original Stories By Censored Writers; Edited and Introduction by Judy Blume. Blume tells the story of how she circumnavigated the naysayers to read her first book by John O'Hara. Not a new title (2001), but definitely one worth reading.

From the Introduction: When I was growing up I’d heard that if a movie or book was “Banned in Boston” everybody wanted to see it or read it right away. My older brother, for example, went to see such a movie -- The Outlaw, starring Jane Russell -- and I wasn’t supposed to tell my mother. I begged him to share what he saw, but he wouldn’t. I was intensely curious about the adult world and hated the secrets my parents, and now my brother, kept from me.

A few years later, when I was in fifth grade, my mother was reading a novel called A Rage to Live, by John O’Hara, and for the first time (and, as it turned out, the only time) in my life, she told me I was never to look at that book, at least not until I was much older. Once I knew my mother didn’t want me to read it, I figured it must be really interesting!

Darkness Too Visible

Piece in the WSJ: Darkness Too Visible - Contemporary fiction for teens is rife with explicit abuse, violence and depravity. Why is this considered a good idea?

Response at EarlyWord: There they go again

Pages

Subscribe to Children