Children

Summer's Coming to a Close @ Your Library

Florida youth have not spent the entire summer at the seaside; in fact, many of them have been participating in summer reading programs!

From the Foster Folly News, an update on the Summer Reading Program at the Chipley Library. Childrens librarian Zedra Hawkins said 18 preschoolers, 114 elementary school students, 68 students from the middle schools, and 31 high school students participated in this year's summer reading program. More than 536 book reviews were entered for drawings for prizes.

Zoning Board tries to stop children's room addition to library in wealthy area of NY

Featured on boing boing: Rich NY town tries to shut down children's library because poor kids might use it

The boing boing comments are interesting too!

Lebanese Librarians Publish Book to Encourage Children to Read

BEIRUT, LEBANON: The Monnot Public Library just celebrated its first anniversary; a year dedicated to the promotion of reading among children. A textbook was released for the occasion, intended for librarians and teachers, “99 Recipes to Spice Up the Taste of Reading” (in Arabic I presume?).

The book aims at sharing a librarian’s experience with students. “I quickly realized that the sole presence of books wasn’t enough to get the pupils to read. The librarian plays a crucial role, [they are] the indispensable link between books and children,” explained Nawal Traboulsi, one of the authors.

But at first, it was difficult for her to find her place in the school’s hierarchy. “Librarians don’t have a defined role. They are neither teachers nor parents. Their relation with children is fundamentally different.”

Budget Cuts Bite

Another story on budget cuts, this time in Macon County NC; (scroll halfway down...)

Fontana Regional Library made a request from the town’s non-profit funding pool in the amount of $12,000 for the library system’s Reading Rover Bookmobile service. Since 1999, the Reading Rover Bookmobile has developed pre-literacy skills by bringing monthly story time programs and materials to toddlers and preschoolers at child care locations.

Librarian Karen Wallace said this is the first time funds have been requested from the town specifically for the Reading Rover. The program costs around $475 per day to run 200 days per year. Historically, the program has been funded through grants which have disappeared, she said.

Alderman Bob Scott said that reading is very important and the future of Franklin is the children. “I think it is an excellent program,” he said of the Reading Rover, adding that many countries in war have little educational opportunities for their young people. Scott asked if the Reading Rover could take the place of ice cream trucks and cruise the neighborhoods during the summer months, offering reading materials to the youth of Franklin.

Do you think the Reading Rover could replace the tempting melody of the ice cream truck? Interesting idea...not sure it's plausible.

Why My Kids Do Not Participate in Summer Reading Programs

Treatise from a homeschooling mother on why her children DO NOT participate in summer reading programs at libraries.

Sara McGrath states, "My children have participated in various bookstore and library events, but I have never enrolled them in a summer reading program. For the same reasons that I don't endorse cash rewards for grades, I don't support incentive programs for reading."

Guess her kids aren't going to see some poor librarian dye her hair green or get buried in jello.

'Early Literacy on the Go' Kits Help Win Award for Bernardsville (NJ) Library

Bernardsville Public Library was recognized at the State House in Trenton by Senate Resolution as a winner of the New Jersey State Library's contest on Best Practices in Early Childhood Literacy. Youth Services Librarian Michaele Casey and Library Director Karen Brodsky were on hand to receive the honor and a check for $500. At the ceremony, the library was cited for its "dedication and commitment to the early reader experiences of preschool children in its community." Only four New Jersey libraries were so honored.

Early Literacy on the Go Kits, developed by Ms. Casey and her staff, were key to winning the award. The kits, in colorful boxes, contain books, toys, sound recordings and information on how to practice early literacy. The acronym SHELLS (Start Helping Early Literacy Learners Succeed) was created to help direct parents, teachers and caregivers to the importance of early literacy. My Central Jersey has the story.

Books, Libraries, Kids

Stories about K-12 libraries that are cutting budgets may be old news to librarians, but Mark Bauerlein, a blogger for The Chronicle of Higher Education's "Brainstorm" blog, has greater concerns. He's annoyed that schools at all levels now spend $8 for technology and only $5 for books. But he says that ultimately the budget cuts for these libraries won't be the real death of reading. According to Bauerlein, "Kids just don’t read books as much as they used to. The diversion menu is larger, with lots of screen tools and toys to fill their leisure hours. Books are cheaper, and free when checked out of the library, and they have more educational value than screen hours, but no matter. Kids like technology, and printed pages appear oh so bland and boring." You just can't beat technology. Read more at:
http://chronicle.com/review/brainstorm/bauerlein/books-libraries-kids

Graphic Novel 'Lunch Lady' to Become a Movie with Amy Poehler

From my friends over at The Hollywood Reporter:

Universal has picked up "Lunch Lady," a children's graphic novel series written and illustrated by Jarrett Krosoczka, with Amy Poehler attached to star. Poehler will executive produce along with the Gotham Group's Ellen Goldsmith-Vein set to produce. Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern are penning the adaptation.

The "Lady" series, the first of which will be unveiled at the end of July by Knopf Books for Young Readers, centers on a mild-mannered school cafeteria server who secretly dishes out helpings of justice as she and her assistant investigate wrongdoings. The books also feature three kids who try to figure out her double life.


The titles include "Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians" and "Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute," both of which are due this summer. "Lunch Lady and the Author Visit Vendetta" is scheduled to be released in December and "Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown" is set for summer 2010.

Librarian Transformed into Human Popcorn Ball

I was hoping this one had a photo with it, but sorry...you'll have to use your imagination. It's another one of those "I'll do thus and such if you kids read X number of books" stories.

Report from Jackson, MS : Children's librarian Melissa Strauss laughed, "I'm here because I want to make good on a promise at the beginning of the school year." The promise: she would become a human popcorn ball. Before she got into the plastic pool filled with popcorn, the principal poured sticky syrup all over Strauss. Then it was time to jump in and roll around.

Why is this happening? This librarian challenged her students to read 10 million words from library books. "They read 10.5 million."

The pure joy of this mess thrilled the students. "I love the way she dived into the pool." "A little like something I want to do to somebody." " I think it was funny." " I love it."

Strauss apparently picks a new 'treat' for the kids each year, and thus far, they haven't let her down.

Free Library of Philadelphia Seeking Donation for Summer Reading Program

While the courts have ruled to keep the library branches in Philadelphia open, the budget cuts are being felt in the system's summer reading program. They have launched a campaign to fill the gap aptly named "10,000 Books for Children". You can directly donate to the library here (you have the option of donating money or buying a book from their reading list).

Every book counts.

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