Children

Graphic Novel 'Lunch Lady' to Become a Movie with Amy Poehler

From my friends over at The Hollywood Reporter:

Universal has picked up "Lunch Lady," a children's graphic novel series written and illustrated by Jarrett Krosoczka, with Amy Poehler attached to star. Poehler will executive produce along with the Gotham Group's Ellen Goldsmith-Vein set to produce. Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern are penning the adaptation.

The "Lady" series, the first of which will be unveiled at the end of July by Knopf Books for Young Readers, centers on a mild-mannered school cafeteria server who secretly dishes out helpings of justice as she and her assistant investigate wrongdoings. The books also feature three kids who try to figure out her double life.


The titles include "Lunch Lady and the League of Librarians" and "Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute," both of which are due this summer. "Lunch Lady and the Author Visit Vendetta" is scheduled to be released in December and "Lunch Lady and the Summer Camp Shakedown" is set for summer 2010.

Librarian Transformed into Human Popcorn Ball

I was hoping this one had a photo with it, but sorry...you'll have to use your imagination. It's another one of those "I'll do thus and such if you kids read X number of books" stories.

Report from Jackson, MS : Children's librarian Melissa Strauss laughed, "I'm here because I want to make good on a promise at the beginning of the school year." The promise: she would become a human popcorn ball. Before she got into the plastic pool filled with popcorn, the principal poured sticky syrup all over Strauss. Then it was time to jump in and roll around.

Why is this happening? This librarian challenged her students to read 10 million words from library books. "They read 10.5 million."

The pure joy of this mess thrilled the students. "I love the way she dived into the pool." "A little like something I want to do to somebody." " I think it was funny." " I love it."

Strauss apparently picks a new 'treat' for the kids each year, and thus far, they haven't let her down.

Free Library of Philadelphia Seeking Donation for Summer Reading Program

While the courts have ruled to keep the library branches in Philadelphia open, the budget cuts are being felt in the system's summer reading program. They have launched a campaign to fill the gap aptly named "10,000 Books for Children". You can directly donate to the library here (you have the option of donating money or buying a book from their reading list).

Every book counts.

Library Rapist Gets Life in Prison

A library rapist got life in prison. The underlying crime was discussed in "Massachusetts Library Revisits Security after Child Molested," by the ALA, American Libraries, 8 February 2008.

Iowa Students Pass On the Love of Reading

First-graders at Riverside (IA) Elementary are getting a little help in developing a love for reading.

The industrial manufacturing class at Highland High, along with sixth-graders at Highland Middle School, donated bookshelves and books they each made in class to the 37 first-graders. They presented the gifts at an assembly at the school Friday morning.

Each of the first-grade students received their own small bookshelf made by the high school students and a book written and published by the sixth-graders to take home. Great idea, story from the Iowa Press Citizen.

Mom Protests Library's 'Sexual' Spider-Man Comic

A Millard mother said she's upset by a comic book that she considers sexually explicit that is in her son's elementary school library.
The comic is part of a popular new series about Spider-Man and the head librarian of the Millard School District said it's been in high demand.
"My son looked at this and goes, 'Ohhhh!'" said Physha Svendsen.

Full story here.

30 Poets/30 Days -- a celebration of children's poetry all through National Poetry Month

This April, 30 children's poets -- including current Children's Poet Laureate Mary Ann Hoberman, past Laureate Jack Prelutsky, Nikki Giovanni, Lee Bennett Hopkins, Nikki Grimes, Douglas Florian, Jane Yolen, J. Patrick Lewis, Linda Sue Park, Pat Mora, Arnold Adoff, X. J. Kennedy, Adam Rex, and the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature Jon Scieszka -- will be sharing previously unpublished poetry at the GottaBook blog (http://gottabook.blogspot.com). Every day in April will feature a new poem and poet, and access to the project, called 30 Poets/30 Days, is completely free.

The full list of poets and other information is here:

http://gottabook.blogspot.com/2009/03/announcing-30-poets30-days.html

ACLU challenges Cleveland Heights Schools over Removal of Nintendo Magazine from Library

A principal's decision to remove a magazine from a middle-school library has drawn criticism for the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school board from the American Civil Liberties Union.

The ACLU said the First Amendment was violated when Brian Sharosky, principal of Roxboro Middle School, confiscated the November issue of Nintendo Power magazine. The magazine covers the world of Nintendo video games, from previews and ratings to secret codes and short cuts.

"Literature should not be removed from a school library simply because one person may find it inappropriate," said Christine Link, ACLU of Ohio executive director, in a statement last week. She called for the board to "immediately order that the magazine be reinstated."

Sharosky deemed that particular issue unsuitable for students in grades six to eight because of a "violent figure" on the cover and content about a game that's rated for mature audiences, according to district spokesman Michael Dougherty

The librarian objected, maintaining that staff members -- including the principal -- are supposed to follow the policy for challenging a publication. That starts with submitting a form to the superintendent and ends with a decision by the school board.

Most Portland Schools Don't have Certified Librarians

If, as advocates say, the library should be the "living room" of a school, the place where kids can ask questions, find what they're passionate about and expand their world view, Portland Public Schools leaders acknowledge they're overdue for a change.

Some kids barely know how to find books and check them out. Others rarely visit the library without teacher prompts. Students have limited access and little familiarity.

Superintendent Carole Smith wants to fix that. In her budget released last week, Smith is requiring all traditional schools, about 75, to staff their libraries for at least 20 hours a week.

Portland was rated tenth in CCSU's America's Most Literate Cities in 2008.

Librarian fights to make sure all kids are represented in books

Kathleen Horning is director of the UW-Madison's Cooperative Children's Book Center, a non-circulating research library devoted solely to books for kids. "She just excels at mentoring young librarians," said Schliesman, who like Horning started as a student staffer. "This is a really important profession that has a huge impact on the lives of children and families in this country. She is looking for people who can carry that idea forward, people that she sees potential in."

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