Employment & Work Stories

Ex-librarian gets little jail time for theft

Ex-librarian gets little jail time for theft
The support of the library district she stole from and ill effects of medication led to a milder sentence for a former St. Elmo library director Friday. She received a 30-day jail sentence despite recommendations from both state and defense attorneys and medical professionals she not be incarcerated.

Library trustees 'undo' staff reorganization

Yikes!...Trustees of Conway Public Library, on Saturday, rescinded their controversial decision to reorganize the library's staff, a move which could have cost four popular librarians their jobs. Still, two dozen picketers demonstrated outside the library calling for the ouster of the director and trustee chair.

Do I need to wear pantyhose in order to be taken seriously?

Hiring Librarians http://hiringlibrarians.wordpress.com/ , the blog
about hiring librarians, has a new survey that explores What
Candidates Should Wear, including age old questions like "Should I
wear a suit?" and "Do I need to wear pantyhose in order to be taken
seriously?". It was co-written by Jill from Librarian Hire Fashion
http://librarianhirefashion.tumblr.com/

Initial results are here:
http://hiringlibrarians.com/2012/09/09/stats-and-graphs-what-should-candidates-wear/
but more responses are needed, especially from people who hire school
and special librarians, as well as archivists. If you want to help
librarians improve the quality of their applications, you can take the
survey by following the link on this page:
http://hiringlibrarians.wordpress.com/participate/

OH County Library Hires Firm to Study Employees’ Compensation

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County has hired a Cleveland consulting firm to study the pay and benefits of library employees compared with those of their peers doing similar work elsewhere.

That firm, The Human Resource Department, will be paid between $12,000 and $13,500 for the compensation study, depending on its scope.

The services and personnel committee of the library’s board of trustees will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday at the Poland library to discuss the library system’s compensation philosophy and the compensation study.

Story from The Youngstown Vindicator (interesting newspaper name!)

Former Library of Congress Auditor Says He was Fired for Being Gay

From The Washington Post: Peter TerVeer was an up-and-coming auditor for the Library of Congress’s inspector general’s office. His boss liked him so much he tried to set him up with his single daughter, TerVeer says.

But when the boss discovered TerVeer was gay after learning from his daughter TerVeer “Liked” a Facebook page for same-sex parents, the supervisor harassed him with religious-based homophobia — and eventually got him fired, TerVeer alleges in a federal lawsuit.

The lawsuit, filed Aug. 3 in U.S. District Court in Washington, claims that TerVeer, 30, suffered discrimination based on sex stereotyping and his religious beliefs in violation of Title VII of the U.S. Civil Rights Act.

It charges that TerVeer was subjected to a hostile work environment for more than a year by his supervisor, John Mech, who quoted biblical passages to him condemning homosexuality.

Additional details in The Washington Blade.

New Poet Laureate Appointed At LC

The Office of Communications at the Library of Congress announced that Mississippi Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey was named 19th US Poet Laureate. Trethwey will hold the positions concurrently. Poets.org has a profile posted of the new appointee. Huffington Post and the New York Times have more on the appointment as well.

Shorter University Fires Tenured Librarian for Being Gay

http://projectqatlanta.com/news_articles/view/shorter_university_sacks_its_gay_librarian?gid...

That long list of Shorter University employees who are no longer employees on the north Georgia campus thanks to the gay witch hunt launched by President Donald Dowless? Add one.

Librarian Refuses to Sign "Lifestyle Statement"

Librarian Refuses to Sign "Lifestyle Statement"

During his 14 years at Shorter University, Michael Wilson, a librarian, built a library collection for the college’s satellite campus in Atlanta. He shaped his post as the first full-time librarian for adult and professional students. Then he won tenure, and planned to stay at the Baptist college in Rome, Ga., until retirement.

Instead, last week, he effectively handed in his resignation.

[Thanks Charley!]

Disastrous Plan for Philadelphia's Library for the Blind

From the Philadelphia Inquirer:

The Philadelphia Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, the nation's oldest book collection serving the visually impaired and one of only two in the commonwealth, is slated to be dramatically diminished this week, as services and the collection are slashed.

The plan calls for moving most reading materials to the smaller, less-used Pittsburgh branch; foolishly dumping half a million recorded cassettes; and halving the caring, veteran staff that helps disabled patrons in 29 counties. [ed: I heard about this plan while at PLA in Philadelphia in March; word has it that its the plan of Governor Tom Corbett, a native of Pittsburgh].

The merger makes absolutely no sense and will not save the commonwealth a cent, while providing slower, less efficient service to an already underserved population. Indeed, critics believe the merger will cost more money in unanticipated operating costs.

Major Cuts in Canadian Library And Archives

From CBC News: The federal government is eliminating a series of libraries and archives throughout different departments as part of the latest budget cuts.

Library and Archives Canada alone has received or will still receive more than 500 surplus notices and the department announced 20 per cent of its workforce would be let go.

The cuts to the government's archival collections stretch beyond just one department, though. Libraries at the transport, immigration and public works departments will be eliminated.

That is a scary prospect, according to researchers, genealogists and academics that often rely on such libraries and history to develop their work.

"Professionals and scientists who work in those departments need access to those specialized libraries to develop policy," said James Turk, president of the Canadian Association of University Professors.

"As well, other Canadians rely on those specialized libraries and there aren't other libraries that have those people and can make up for that."

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