Electronic Publications

Cell phone or a Kindle?

Oprah discussed the Kindle on her show a couple weeks ago. See LISNEWS story about that here. At the Oprah.com website there is a posting from a user complaining that Oprah has on financial people that say not to spend money on things we want just on things we need and then has a show promoting the $350 Kindle. Other people have commented both pro and con to the point. I found one person's comments to be particularly interesting: I loved the show about the Kindle. My 12 year old daughter is such a huge reader..... when I saw the show I thought it would be a great christmas present for her. but since I was not working at the time I thought there would be no way that we could afford one. (actually two because I want one too). My daughter is always researching new books to read and is always nickle and diming us to death. We come from a small community and our library is 30 miles away. Also, they never have the new releases, so we are ordering books on line since we want to encourage her to keep reading. Tonight I asked her if she would rather have a Kindle or a cell phone. She has wanted a cell phone for the last 2 years, but just can't justify the monthly charges. But tonight, when I talked with her, she said she would rather have a Kindle which was wonderful.

Google Settlement Has A Few Unseen Wrinkles for Authors

The $125 million settlement between Google and a class-action group headed by the Author’s Guild and Association of American Publishers, at first glance looks like the perfect dream for authors. After a five-year court battle against Google, authors and publishers may at last see some compensation for books initially scanned without permission by the search mogul.

That’s the good news. However, a closer look at the 323-page legal tomb gives rise to some questions that publishers, authors and their agents may want to answer before unreservedly embracing the Google Book Search program.

Full article here.

LISNEWS on the Kindle

It was not Oprah that convinced me to get a Kindle
but the $50 off I got by using her discount code didn't hurt. (Use OPRAHWINFREY code at checkout for $50 off, good until Nov 1) My Kindle arrived in the mail today. I have used it for a couple hours and here are my initial impressions.

The e-ink screen is easy to read. Equal to reading a page out of a book in my opinion. There is the added plus that any book can be made into a large print book by changing the font size. With ebooks I also select a larger size font. I figure that since I can make things even easier on my eyes why not do it.

The Kindle has the ability to go on the Internet. I checked out LISNEWS and was able to read the site fine. You can follow the links out to other sites but not every site works great on the Kindle. Just like looking at the web on a PDA there are certain limitations to how well things display on a smaller screen. Sites that are formatted for PDAs display well on the Kindle. In fact they are better than on a PDA because the Kindle screen is significantly bigger than a PDA screen. -- Read More

Kindle on Oprah


Page at Oprah's website about the Kindle.

Here is a link to a video of Bezos and Oprah giving a presentation called Kindle Class.

Amazon delays UK Kindle launch

Not even good boys and girls will get a Kindle for Christmas

Amazon will not be in a position to launch its Kindle e-book reader in the UK in time for the Christmas market, according to the firm's UK managing director.

Brian McBride told Bookseller magazine that the launch was being held up because Amazon is still in the process of licensing international mobile access and sorting out roaming issues.

"If you need agreement with carriers in the US, there is one carrier. In Europe it is a minefield, as there are so many operators," he said.

Full story here.

Book industry cautiously optimistic about the Kindle, electronic books

The Frankfurt Book Fair just wrapped up, and one clear theme emerged from the show: people are willing to embrace digitized books, à la the Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader, but they may need some time to get used to the idea.

For example, Penguin called such gadgets “mainstream” and no longer in “the province of geeks any longer.”

Full story here.

DRM In Your Library? Consider This...

Thinking about utilizing a service in your library which uses Digital Rights Management (DRM)?

Consider the wise comic of Randall Munroe:

Italy pupils ditch books for PCs

Pupils at a school in Italy are replacing all their text books with computers for a year - in what is being described as a unique experiment. More than 60 children - aged between eight and 10 - at Turin's Don Milani school will be using mini laptops with the full curriculum.

Librarian's Internet Index merging with IPL

The well known Librarian's Internet Index (LII) has merged with IPL at Drexel. As many are aware of, and as mentioned in the notice below, LII has had their funding cut by 50% the last two years. The merger with Drexel allows ILL the opportunity to continue sharing of sites.

This notice appeared in their last weekly e-mail:

LII IS NOW ADMINISTERED BY IPL
This week the editors received a press release announcing LII's merger with the Internet Public Library (IPL). IPL is a huge and wonderful Web portal hosted by Drexel University and maintained by a consortium of colleges and universities with programs in information science. It has solid funding and a paid staff augmented by graduate students in library and information studies programs, allowing it to maintain and improve the database's content and aesthetics with new skills and technical tools.
As you may know, in the last two years LII's funding was cut by 50%. Consequently, we had to reduce the number of sites we add each week, halt improvements to the browsing structure, and generally do less of everything. IPL will give LII's years of work continued life and value and we think they'll do a terrific job. The LII editorial staff and the newsletter will continue through April 30, 2009. We will share news with you as it becomes available; for more information, please contact IPL or Linda Crowe at

This was the e-mail they sent to subscribers: -- Read More

Law school profs ponder printed books (Amazon.com no show)

Law professors from around the country gathered in Seattle on Saturday to put the printed textbook on trial.

And because those professors and their universities influence the buying decisions of thousand of law students each year, traditional book publishers as well as representatives from Adobe, Sony and Microsoft participated. A representative from Amazon.com did not attend as expected.

The daylong discussion educed topics ranging from cerebral musings – could information proliferation make lawyers obsolete? – to technical nuance – what's the difference between open source and open access?

At least one conclusion became clear – the fact that about 40 people gathered at Sullivan Hall at Seattle University Law School on a sunny Saturday to ponder life beyond print shows that times are changing in publishing.

Blog entry at seattlepi.com

Syndicate content