Government Docs

Mergers In The UK

Anonymous Patron writes "eGov monitor Reports The National Archives and The Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI), which is currently attached to the Cabinet Office, are to merge. The merger will create a stronger centre for information management in the public sector, enabling a more responsive approach to the challenges of new technology. The merger was announced today in a statement made jointly by Hilary Armstrong MP, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, in the Commons and Baroness Ashton of Upholland, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Constitutional Affairs, in the Lords."

New FGI Discussions: June 19, 2006

Activity was heavy at Free Government Information (http://freegovinfo.info) (FGI) this week as guest blogger Jessamyn West and the regular FGI volunteers started the following discussions: Jessamyn's postings:

Volunteer postings:

No FDSys related activity has been observed at the main FDSys site in the past week. However, exciting things are happening at the FDSys Blog. On June 16th, the FDSys staff posted a "FDSys Update" for 6/2/2006 and included the following note: "NOTE: GPO intends to post brief FDsys Program Management Office updates to the blog on a bi-weekly basis." The current update features news on GPO automated web harvesting and efforts to integrate their newly acquired Aleph ILS with the Future Digital System. I think I speak for the whole FGI group when I say we are very pleased to see this level of commitment to regular communication and look foward to future updates. If you use Bloglines (http://www.bloglines.com/) or some other RSS reader, consider subscribing to the FGI Feed at http://freegovinfo.info/blog/feed to get FGI stories as they are posted.

New FGI Discussions: June 12, 2006

Activity at Free Government Information (http://freegovinfo.info) picked up this week as volunteers posted more stories and we welcomed a new guest blogger. Our June BOTM, Jessamyn West, opened with a posting EPA - can a database replace a library? which parallels the concerns of some government documents librarians. Our regular volunteers posted the following stories this past week:

As always we hope that you will stop by and join our conversation. If you haven't already, please vote in our poll on archiving gov't e-docs at http://freegovinfo.info/node/476. We've got 102 votes and nine comments, and we'd like to see all 229 depository libraries who gave a positive response to question 65 to weigh in. No FDSys related activity has been observed at the main FDSys site or at the recently revived FDSys Blog during the past week. If you use Bloglines (http://www.bloglines.com/) or some other RSS reader, consider subscribing to the FGI Feed at http://freegovinfo.info/blog/feed to get FGI stories as they are posted.

The Amateur Sleuth Who Gave the Archives a Red Face

The Washingto Post has a report on Matthew M. Aid. The scandal over missing documents that rocked the National Archives this spring came to light not because of the digging of an investigative reporter or a timely leak by a concerned federal insider.Instead it was Matthew M. Aid, an amateur researcher and historian, who figured out that for at least six years the CIA and the Air Force had been withdrawing thousands of records from the public shelves -- and that Archives officials had helped cover up their efforts.

NARA: Better approach needed for records

Washingto Technology has an article on a new report from the National Archives and Records Administration. “We need to streamline the multiple, inefficient and, at times, ineffective independent agency reviews of the same material,†according to the report, which was published by NARA’s Information Security Oversight Office.

There are an increasing numbers of documents being classified, primarily for counterterrorism activities and critical infrastructure protection, at the Homeland Security and Justice departments.

The total number of classifications dropped to 14.2 million in fiscal 2005, a decrease from 15.6 million the year before. That reversed an upward trend that had been occurring since 2001, with 8.7 million classifications that year. In 2002 there were 11.3 million, in 2003 14.2 million, and in 2004 15.6 million.

New FGI Discussions: June 5, 2006

This week we bid goodbye and give thanks to our May BOTM Cindi Wolff. We are also thrilled to announce that for June we will have the blogger who put the 'rarin into librarian. That's right, Jessamyn West of librarian.net is Free Government Information's guest blogger for June. Thanks Jessamyn! Cindi posted to the end, and our regular volunteers posted the following stories this past week: Cindi's postings:

Volunteer postings:

As always we hope that you will stop by and join our conversation. If you haven't already, please vote in our poll on archiving gov't e-docs at http://freegovinfo.info/node/476. We've got 95 votes and nine comments, and we'd like to see all 229 depository libraries who gave a positive response to question 65 to weigh in. No FDSys related activity has been observed at the main FDSys site during the past week. If you use Bloglines (http://www.bloglines.com/) or some other RSS reader, consider subscribing to the FGI Feed at http://freegovinfo.info/blog/feed to get FGI stories as they are posted.

New FGI Discussions: May 29, 2006

This week was a light one for our guest blogger Cindi Wolff and our regular Free Government Information volunteers, but we still managed to post the following stories: Cindi's postings:

Volunteer postings:

As always we hope that you will stop by and join our conversation. If you haven't already, please vote in our poll on archiving gov't e-docs at http://freegovinfo.info/node/476. We've got 87 votes and nine comments, and we'd like to see all 229 depository libraries who gave a positive response to question 65 to weigh in. No FDSys related activity has been observed either at the main FDSys site during the past week. If you use Bloglines (http://www.bloglines.com/) or some other RSS reader, consider subscribing to the FGI Feed at http://freegovinfo.info/blog/feed to get FGI stories as they are posted.

New FGI Discussions: May 22, 2006

This week found our guest blogger Cindi Wolff and our regular Free Government Information volunteers posting the following stories: Cindi's postings:

Volunteer postings:

As always we hope that you will stop by and join our conversation. If you haven't already, please vote in our poll on archiving gov't e-docs at http://freegovinfo.info/node/476. We've got 85 votes and nine comments, and we'd like to see all 229 depository libraries who gave a positive response to question 65 to weigh in. No FDSys related activity has been observed either at the main FDSys site or at their blog, which has been dormant since January. If someone from GPO knows whether the blog at http://fdsys.blogspot .com has been officially abandoned, I'd appreciate hearing from them. If you use Bloglines (http://www.bloglines.com/) or some other RSS reader, consider subscribing to the FGI Feed at http://freegovinfo.info/blog/feed to get FGI stories as they are posted.

Keep EPA Libraries Open

The Hartford Courant Says EPA libraries are a mother lode of scientific and regulatory information. Used by developers as well as federal, state and local regulators, they hold information about emerging environmental technologies, the health risks associated with hazardous chemicals, hazardous waste sites, water quality data and regional ecosystems. Although many of the documents can be found elsewhere, locating them will become harder, more time-consuming and more costly.

Information is essential to smart regulation and good development. The Bush administration's proposed budget cut is shortsighted and poorly conceived. Ultimately, it would hamper environmental protection, not help it.

Protecting the Nation's Memory

Linda K. Kerber is a professor of history at the University of Iowa has written a POV Column in the Chronicle on the National Archives and Records Administration allowing some federal agencies to withdraw declassified documents from public view and the Smithsonian Institution has signed an agreement with Showtime Networks to create an on-demand cable-television channel. That the Federal Bureau of Investigation wants to search the papers of the late investigative journalist Jack Anderson. She asks have you thought about what those controversies mean taken together?

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