Harry Potter

A Leaked Sneak Peek at the HP Trailer

Have you seen the new Harry Potter trailer?

Rowling Addresses Harvard

Want to hear J. K. Rowling tell about the value of failure?

Harvard Magazine has a video of her speech given at the annual meeting of the alumni association. Rowling admits to being a nervous wreck about speaking at Harvard.

Did the Boy Wizard Cause This Library Worker To Lose Her Job?

POPLAR BLUFF, Mo. - A Poplar Bluff woman refused to attend a work related party, and claims the fallout forced her to quit her library job. Now she's filed a lawsuit in federal court.

Deborah Smith tells Heartland News she didn't want to work at a library sponsored Harry Potter book party, because she feels the contents of the wizard series go against her personal religious beliefs.

Smith claims she was suspended for ten days without pay, and says her work duties changed when she returned to the library. Smith quit her job and started the legal battle for her rights. Story here.

HP - The Prequel

HP - The Prequel
But you may not get to read it.
"JK Rowling has written a secret prequel to the Harry Potter series which is to be sold at auction next month to raise money for charity.
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Her Potter prequel, which will not be published, comes almost a year after the last book in the boy-wizard series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, hit the shelves.
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Money raised from the sale will go to English PEN, which promotes understanding through literature, and Dyslexia Action. "

ACLU files suit in Poplar Bluff 'Harry Potter' librarian case

ACLU files suit in Poplar Bluff 'Harry Potter' librarian case: The American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern Missouri announced today via news release that it has filed a suit on behalf of a part-time librarian in Poplar Bluff, Mo., who was disciplined after she objected to participating in the promotion of a "Harry Potter" book.

The employee had religious objections to the promotion, "which she believed encouraged children to worship the occult," according to the news release.

Gods, Prophets and Outcasts...Another Harry Potter Tale

Insight and analysis into the fan feud between J. K. Rowling and HP Lexicon author, Steven Vander Ark from The New Yorker.

Add into the mix, Melissa Anelli, webmistress of "The Leaky Cauldron" who has won the approval of author Rowling. Says Vander Ark: “Melissa has done more to hurt me than Rowling. I can’t blame her for liking her status.” After all, he said, Rowling “is God and Melissa is her prophet.” He went on, “I am an outcast now. But I still consider myself a ‘Harry Potter’ fan.”

Still waiting for the judgment from the trial...

Poof! Potter titles vanish for first time in a decade

Poof! Harry Potter has performed a new vanishing act.

For the first time in nearly a decade, the New York Times bestseller lists will be without a title featuring J.K. Rowling's hugely popular young wizard. And the character is finally disappearing from the Canadian rankings as well.

An A-level in Harry Potter: Experts fear ‘dumbing down’ as book becomes set text

Good News For Harry Fans: Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone is being offered as a 'set text' by the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance (AQA), the UK's largest exam board, which is responsible for nearly half of the country's exams. But horrified education experts fear Harry will rob the A-level of credibility.

Harry Potter case brings the law into Internet Age

CNN Takes A Good Look at Rowling Vs. The Librarian. Most lawyers agree this is a close call. That is because this is an extremely close call on the law, almost a toss-up, in my view. Even U.S. District Court Judge Robert Patterson, who is deciding the case, said so, urging the parties to settle. "This case is in a murky state of the law," said Patterson. "I've listened to the parties and heard them. I'm not sure you couldn't settle even now, if you listen to what's being said."

Harry Potter case illustrates blurry line in copyright law

In short, by deciding to sell his material, Vander Ark was stepping across a line. He was no longer just an enthusiastic fan, but a professional and potential competitor — fair game for the lawyers.

The question now for the courts is whether the lexicon itself violates copyright law, and the decision may not be easy.

U.S. rules allow for the "fair use" of copyrighted material in unauthorized works, but there are limits. Journalists may quote from films and books when writing a review. Scholars can use excerpts from a novel while penning an author's biography.

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