Harry Potter

Harry Potter Book Seven Due Next Year

ith Liz confirming to IANS that the last 'Harry Potter' book from Rowling would hit the bookstores in 2007, the 67-year-old publishing director of Bloomsbury and the force behind Potter-mania, expects new writers to cast a spell on readers and does not rule out an Indian emerging successfully on the international scene. In An Interview Calder said Rowling would write only one more book in the series and no more.

'One more 'Harry Potter' only but she (Rowling) said from the beginning that she would write seven. So she would not write another one after this. But Rowling would write other books for us,' said Liz.

'The next 'Harry Potter' book is likely to come out in 2007.

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Dracorex hogwartsia 'Harry Potter' dinosaur finds a home

Ender sent over This One ages ago on The 66 million-year-old skull of a dinosaur whose name was inspired by the Harry Potter series that has found a permanent home in the Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

Dracorex hogwartsia will be housed permanently at the museum, officials and paleontol

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Harry Potter Book Seven Due In 2007

Bloomsbury publishing director Liz Calder said the next and final Harry Potter book is "likely" to be released in 2007... she hopes.

At the British Council's Creative Future conference in India this week, Calder allegedly said as much in an interview with Indo-Asian News Service:

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Harry & the Potters -Playing at a Library Near You

http://search-engines-web.com/ writes "Do Re Me... reuters.com Has A report on A new guitar-driven rock band, ''Harry and the Potters'' has muggles head-banging away in America.The brothers perform for free in venues like libraries, bookstores and art galleries and hit the touring circuit at clubs like New York City's NorthSix"

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For Book Publishing in '05, Harry Potter Worked Magic

The NY TImes Reports Harry Potter, books by religious leaders and textbooks for elementary and high school students were the bright spots in publishing last year, according to a report to be released today by the Book Industry Study Group, a publishing trade association.

Publishers generated net revenue of $34.6 billion in 2005, up 5.9 percent from the previous year, according to the report. The industry sold about 3.1 billion books last year, up 3.8 percent from a year earlier.

Fans welcome Japan release of latest Harry Potter book

Fans of the popular "Harry Potter" novels lined up outside bookstores on Wednesday, eager to get their hands on the latest installment in the series as it went on sale in Japan.

"Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" is the sixth and latest installment in British author J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. The books have appeared on shelves in some 150 countries and regions and sold a total of more than 300 million copies.

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Harry Potter takes the goblet in Australia

The Harry Potter series has been voted Australian children's favourite read in a poll of more than 23,000 readers. Children aged five to 17 were asked to nominate their favourite book in the Angus & Robertson poll, with 60,000 votes received from more than 23,000 children in one month.

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Hearing officer: 'Potter' should stay on shelves

In the fight to stay on the shelves of Gwinnett County schools, it looks like Harry Potter has won another battle.
The hearing officer in the case has strongly recommended that the best-selling book series stay in school libraries. The decision came after Laura Mallory, a Loganville mother with three children at J.C. Magill Elementary School, filed formal complaints requesting all the Harry Potter books be removed. More At gwinnettdailypost.com

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Parent putting Harry to the test

Laura Mallory wants to put an Avada Kedavra curse on the Harry Potter book series.
The working mother of four admits she's never read any of the six books published thus far in the seven-book series by J.K. Rowling. The books are "too long" (book five alone was 870 pages) and she works a part-time job, Mallory writes on her "appeal form for instructional materials." She hasn't read them, yet she wants them off the shelves of the Gwinnett County Public School system libraries. Gwinnett Daily Post - Griffin,GA has the rest of this one, it gets funnier.

The house that Harry built

Once, Bloomsbury was a small, well-respected, independent publisher. Now, thanks to JK Rowling's phenomenal success, it has more money than it knows how to spend. But are the Potter millions distorting the British book trade? And does the publisher risk losing its soul? Matt Seaton reports

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