Distance Learning

Three Fee-Free Library Webinars from MaintainIT: Laptops, Training, and Gaming

Join us for these free webinars. Attend this session from your library, no travel needed!

At the MaintainIT Project (www.maintainitproject.org), we interview hundreds of librarians about how they maintain, support, and sustain their public computers. We then publish all of their experiences, successes, and challenges in FREE guides called Cookbooks, so librarians can learn from the experiences of others who’ve done it before them. The best part? Everything the MaintainIT Project does is FREE (thanks to a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant), and everything is on www.maintainitproject.org . We also produce free webinars every month!

Sept. 30th Cookbook Book Club: How Much Help Should You Provide Patrons With Laptops?
When: 09/30/2008 9:00am - 10:00am Pacific
Where: Register on MaintainIT's webinar space. https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/schedule/display.do?rfe=1aboa5dakke0&udc=1sjlixarncf42 Download and read the Cookbook chapter (pdf) here: http://www.maintainitproject.org/files/CB2_Meal%20Plan%20Three.pdf
This month Brenda Hough will lead a lively discussion where you can share ideas, feedback, and ask questions about providing help and support to patrons using laptops. Find out how other libraries have handled troubleshooting, security, parking lot surfers, space issues and more!

Oct. 8th Train-the-Trainer: The Power of Stories in Technology Training
When: 10/08/2008 11:00am - 12:00pm Pacific -- Read More

Free Webinar: Public Computers and 2.0 Tools (Sponsored by MaintainIT and WebJunction)

On September 17th, spend 30 minutes learning about Public Computers and 2.0 Tools. Join Robin Hastings, from the Missouri River Regional Library, as she shares the steps her library has taken to foster a 2.0 friendly environment at their library, both for staff and library users. By setting up a flexible computing environment and creating innovative learning opportunities, this creative professional has helped her community make the most of collaborative technologies. Take 30 minutes out of your day to learn from the experiences of others.

The MaintainIT Project tracks down good ideas so you don't have to reinvent the wheel! Access free articles, cookbooks and other resources to help support public access computing at: http://www.maintainitproject.org.

WHEN: September 17th, 11 AM (Pacific Time Zone)
WHERE: WebJunction's webinar space (Please register on WebJunction.org:

Health, Education and Informatics resource - website & blog

Originally created in the UK by Brian E Hodges (Ret.) at Manchester Metropolitan University -

Hodges' Health Career - Care Domains - Model [h2cm]

http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/

- can help map health, social care and OTHER issues, problems and solutions. The
model takes a situated and multi-contextual view across four knowledge domains:

* Interpersonal;
* Sociological;
* Empirical;
* Political.

Our links pages cover each care (knowledge) domain e.g. SCIENCES:

http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/linksTwo.htm

INTERPERSONAL:
http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/links.htm

Thank you for your time and best wishes for the holidays.

Peter Jones
RMN, RGN, BA(Hons) Comp/Phil, PGCE, PG(Dip) COPE, CPN(Cert)
Community Mental Health Nurse Older Adults,
Independent Scholar & Informatics Specialist
Bolton
Lancashire
UK
--
http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/
Hodges' Health Career - Care Domains - Model
http://hodges-model.blogspot.com/
h2cm: help 2C more - help 2 listen - help 2 care

Learning in Library School

Over on the ACRL Blog, Melissa Mallon posts about things she did learn in library school. A change from all of the posts highlighting what they didn't learn and overall very positive. What did you learn in library school that's helped you out?

A new search engine...

Sarah, from LibrarianInBlack, shares this cool search engine that I hadn't seen before. It's called Carrot, and not only is it open source (so you can use it on your library's website), but it clusters results together. What I mean by this is try searching for the term Harry Potter. Over on the side they divide topics up so that you can narrow results by title of books or wands. You also have subheadings so that you can see where the results came from or the sources the engine found it in (such as Ask!, Google, etc.)
Very cool!

Virtual Congress of women farmers at ISC meet

"Visakhapatnam (PTI): For the first time in the history of Indian Science Congress, a Virtual Congress of women farmers, who constitute a major chunk of the country's agricultural workforce, was held on Saturday as part of the annual science meet currently underway in this port city.

The Virtual Congress was jointly organized by Chennai-based M S Swaminathan Research Foundation and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in which women members of six Village Resource Centres (VRC) spread across the country participated through a technical know-how provided by the space agency.

Read the full article at:

Virtual Congress of women farmers at ISC meet

Information Literacy partners

This was posted last week by the Shifted Librarian, but thought I'd pass it on.

"Karen Markey is a faculty member in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Earlier this year, she received a small grant from the Delmas Foundation to build a prototype online board game that teaches students information-literacy skills. Her game prototype is now fully operational and is being tested and evaluated by a class of 75 undergraduates at the University of Michigan."

Karen is now looking for some help to further test her idea. So take a look at the posting for more information.

OpenYale

I know this is probably old news to some, but Yale has officially opened its OpenYale program for seven classes taught by professors at Yale, which is really kinda of cool. You can download onto your MP3 or watch it live online. Best part, you don't have to hand in homework or takes tests!

Library on the Moon

JET writes "I saw this link on
boingboing.net".

e-Learning Patent Award Outrages Educators

Search Engine WEB writes "Blackboard has been awarded a patent establishing its claims to some of the basic features of the software that powers online education.The patent, awarded to the Washington, D.C.-based company in January but announced last month, has prompted an angry backlash from the academic computing community, which is fighting back in techie fashion — through online petitions and in a sprawling Wikipedia entry that helps make its case.Critics say the patent claims nothing less than Blackboard's ownership of the very idea of e-learning. If allowed to stand, they say, it could quash the cooperation between academia and the private sector that has characterized e-learning for years and explains why virtual classrooms are so much better than they used to be. http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/techpolicy/2006- 08-27-blackboard-dispute_x.htm?csp=34"

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