Humor

Library book cake

See a very detailed library book cake.

Atlas Shrugged and Alternative Literature

xkcd comic: Bookshelf
xkcd comic 2: Alternative Literature
xkcd comic 3: Librarians

Everything on the Internet is true

It has come to my attention that everything on the Internet is true. You may want to adjust your information literacy curriculum to reflect this point.

Where does a mofro have to go in a library to simply read or quietly study without incessant noise and distractions?

My new favorite letter to the editor!

"In a digital age where everyone from age 5 to 90 is suckling from an electronic teet of one kind or another all day long, the library offers no respite. Fine, media changes. Downstairs is where most of the digital media is kept, aside from the computers that take up much of the space on the main floor. Audio-visual machines with headphones are available, so you'd think perhaps the study desks there would be a good place to study. You'd think wrong, because loud tutoring occurs throughout the day both upstairs and downstairs. A meeting room is where readings and performances for adults and exuberant children are held. I'm absolutely in favor of these and all educational experiences. But where does a mofro have to go in a library to simply read or quietly study without incessant noise and distractions? Seriously! Respectful silence is the most honored and rudimentary rule of every library in the world since the dawn of time. Why does Aspen get it so wrong?"

Freedom

I may not agree with what you say but

Woman's book mistaken for sexy novel

Woman's book mistaken for sexy novel

A Florida woman says her new book based on her work as a dropout-prevention teacher is regularly mistaken for a racy bestseller.

Susanne Jacoby Hale's recently released her first literary work, "Shades of Gray," the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported Friday.

Unfortunately, her book's title is very similar to "Fifty Shades of Grey," a sexy novel with a sadomasochistic storyline by E.L. James.

There will be scrolls

Cartoon in the current issue of the New Yorker.

The Internet will be a fad with little value

The Internet will be a fad
He thought the Internet had no future. Merely a fad. A passing fancy.
We were reminded of scientist Clifford Stoll yesterday when we posted a photo from when the Internet first came to NPR. MPR News reporter Curtis Gilbert recently stumbled upon a gem from the MPR archives, a 1995 interview with Stoll by MPR host Paula Schroeder. Stoll was promoting his book Silicon Snake Oil (at the same time he also published a Newsweek article titled, "The Internet? Bah!")

"STOLL: I'd say it's not that important. I think it's grossly oversold and within two or three years people will shrug and say, '"Uh yep, it was a fad of the early 90's and now, oh yeah, it still exists but hey, I've got a life to lead and work to do. I don't have time to waste online." Or, "I'll collect my email, I'll read it, why should I bother prowling around the Worldwide Web or reading the Usenet" simply because there's so little of value there."

Read So Hard Libraries Try To Find Me

From YouTube:

[Thanks Anna!]

How Did You Celebrate National Library Workers Day?

Did you know yesterday was National Library Works Day? I celebrated by going to work in a library. A Librarian's Guide to Etiquette had the best suggestion: You're Welcome," Saying... Library workers should celebrate National Library Workers Day by passive aggressively muttering "You're welcome!" after refilling the stapler...

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