Associations

“Call for a Library Conference”: The 1876 ALA Conference

The proceedings for the first ALA Conference can be found in the November 30, 1876, issue of the Library Journal, which is available online in HathiTrust. Dennis Thomison, A History of the American Library Association 1876-1972, (Chicago, 1978), p. 5. Smith, Lloyd P., “The Qualifications of a Librarian,” American Library Journal 1: 70 (1876/1877). “The Proceedings,” American Library Journal 1: 140 (1876/1877). Ibid, 141 Ibid, 143
From “Call for a Library Conference”: The 1876 ALA Conference

IFLA issues Statement on Right to be Forgotten

IFLA urges library professionals to participate in policy discussions about the right to be forgotten, while both supporting the right to privacy for individual citizens and assisting individuals in their searches for information.  To this effect, library professionals should:

Raise awareness among policy makers to ensure that the right to be forgotten does not apply where retaining links in search engine results is necessary for historical, statistical and research purposes; for reasons of public interest; or for the exercise of the right of freedom of expression.

From IFLA issues Statement on Right to be Forgotten

Proposal to change the name of American Association of Law Libraries has failed

The proposal to change the name of American Association of Law Libraries to the Association for Legal Information has failed by a vote of 1998 (80.11 percent) opposed, to 496 (19.89 percent) in favor. A record number of members voted on this proposal, with 59.51 percent casting a ballot.

The votes were verified this morning by two members, who served as the election tellers.

http://www.aallnet.org/hc/NewsCallout/AALL-ebriefing-feb11.html

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The International Coalition of Library Consortia: origins, contributions and path forward

The International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC) has its origins in informal discussion and meetings held 2 decades ago. The organization has been a steady presence in the library world as the need and demand for collaboration increased due to changes in educational funding and technology. Early consortial leaders are retiring now at a rapid pace. Current leaders are discussing ICOLC’s organizational structure and goals with the consortial community to maintain the standard of excellence and effectiveness that has existed since its inception. The current environment provides opportunities for greater collaboration at higher scale.

From The International Coalition of Library Consortia: origins, contributions and path forward

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Digital Repositories workshop at the NYLA Annual Conference

Digital Repositories workshop at the NYLA Annual Conference, Wednesday, September 25, 2013, Niagara Falls, NY

Sponsor: Academic and Special Libraries Section
Half Day PM Program 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
This workshop addresses key issues surrounding the creation, maintenance, and cultivation of digital repositories. Drawing on the latest literature, case studies, and personal experiences, speakers lead a discussion that covers planning the digital repository, selecting a methodology for its establishment, populating it with content, marketing it to the library's constituencies, and meeting the various challenges and questions along the way. Participants have the opportunity to bring their own experiences to bear, as well as engage in group discussions regarding how to get the most out of a digital repository.

Presenters:
Jim DelRosso is the Digital Projects Coordinator for Cornell University's Hospitality, Labor, and Management Library, where he is responsible for such projects as [email protected], the digital repository for Cornell's ILR School. A digital librarian since 2009, Jim is also the President for the Upstate New York Chapter of the Special Libraries Association, and has served as the Communication & Social Media Chair for the SLA's Academic Division.

Amy Buckland is the eScholarship, ePublishing & Digitization Coordinator at McGill University Library, where she is responsible for scholarly communication, publishing initiatives, and making rare items from special collections available to the world through digitization. She loves information almost as much as Fluevog shoes, and thinks academic libraryland is ripe for a revolution. You can find her online at informingthoughts.com and in most social networks as Jambina.

From NPR: American Library Association, Barnes & Noble Called 'Facilitators Of Porn'

From NPR's The Two-Way: The American Library Association and Barnes & Noble were among the groups named by conservative group Morality in Media in its "Dirty Dozen List" of "the top 12 facilitators of porn." The list states that the ALA encourages libraries to have unfiltered computers, and that the bookstore chain "is a major supplier of adult pornography and child erotica."

The top spot, however, went to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder for "refus[ing] to enforce existing federal obscenity laws."

Hat tip to Bobbie Newman @librarianbyday for the lead.

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Should Library Associations Do LESS not More?

Radical suggestion: SAA should do less, not more
Kate Theimer: "So, here’s my radical suggestion, which has two parts: SAA should focus on doing less, but doing it better, and what it should focus on is providing direct, tangible services to members. For example, rather than trying to support public relations and national advocacy efforts, invest those resources in things like strengthening the mentorship program, providing better tools for job seekers, making annual meeting sessions available as free downloads, providing more active support for sections and roundtables, and developing resources to help members be effective advocates for their own archives."

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Tributes to Harvey Pekar at libraries in Cleveland and inner suburbs

Comic book writer Harvey Pekar, known for the American Splendor series, is reported by The News-Herald as receiving honors from the Cleveland Public Library and the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library System. Apparently the American Library Association has a United for Libraries division which named the branch in Cleveland Heights a Literary Landmark due to its connections with Pekar.

Both libraries are part of the CLEVNET consortium that stretches along the south shore of Lake Erie in Northern Ohio.

Novelist and Bookstore Owner Ann Patchett Winner of Women's National Book Award

The Women’s National Book Association has announced that novelist Ann Patchett has been selected to receive the 2012-2013 Women’s National Book Award. According to the Association’s website, the biennial award is given to “a living American woman who derives part or all of her income from books and allied arts, and who has done meritorious work in the world of books beyond the duties or responsibilities of her profession or occupation.”

Ann Patchett, whose most recent novel is State of Wonder (HarperCollins, 2011), is the bestselling author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, including the novel Bel Canto, which won both the PEN/Faulkner and Orange Prize in 2002. Patchett’s work has also garnered such accolades as the New York Times Notable Book of the Year, the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, and the BookSense Book of the Year Award; and has been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her articles and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper’s, the Atlantic, the Washington Post, and Vogue.

In 2011, Patchett and publishing veteran Karen Hayes opened Parnassus Books, an independent bookstore in Nashville, Tennessee, after the last remaining bookstores in the city had closed their doors. Patchett has since become a nationally recognized advocate for independent bookselling, and this year was named one of Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World.” Poets & Writers reports.

The Concerned Librarian’s Guide to the 2012 ALA Midwinter Exhibit Hall

The Concerned Librarian’s Guide to the 2012 ALA Midwinter Exhibit Hall
With a number of issues floating around libraryland at the present moment, there has been talk in some of the my social circles about what to do about them. Specifically, how to approach tackling them as it relates to library vendors who have expressed support for legislation that has the potential to impede or block access to information (directly or as collateral damage). As the ALA Midwinter Meeting is just around the corner, I thought it would be a perfect opportunity for librarians to meet with company representatives to discuss their concerns about current contentious legislation (such as the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Research Works Act (RWA)) as well as ongoing concerns (such as library eBook lending). Lest some perseverate or advocate for delaying action, our professional conferences are the best venue to voice our concerns face-to-face for the wide array of actions that have the potential to interfere with information access and exchange. This is not the time to waiver on our values and principles.

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