Furs, Mounts, and Skulls at ARLIS, continued

Following an initial story and slideshow in the Alaska Dispatch News, the Furs, Mounts, and Skulls Collection at ARLIS continued to attract media attention.

NPR's morning edition interviewed ARLIS Librarian Celia Rozen. A recording and transcript of the interview is available at

Check Out What You Can Borrow From A Library In Alaska (NPR)

NPR Morning Edition interview with Celia Rozen about the furs, mounts, and skulls collection at ARLIS, Alaska Resources LIbrary and Information Services.

Need a wolf fur? A puffin pelt? All you need is a library card...

"and a visit to the ARLIS library For years, an Anchorage library has been loaning out skulls, furs and mounted animals to the public -- free of charge."

Alaska Dispatch News Octobe 5, 2015, front page and continuation.


Weird Stuff You Can Check Out @ Your Library

From NPR (doesn't that make me sound like Carl Kasell): weird stuff that can be borrowed from different public libraries.

Items include fishing poles, snow shoes, garden seeds, pictures for your walls and bridal magazines. Anyone out there in LISNews-land lend other non-book items? If so, please comment below.

Discarded Books as Photo Project...and then...Book

Do you ever feel sentimental about weeded books? Then this one's for you. (The NYT recommends that you view it full screen).

While books may not necessarily make for a better reading experience (ed. but it's ok to have a preference one way or the other), they are superior as subject matter for a photo project. (I defy you, dear reader, to find a loving portrait of a Nook.)

To wit, witness Kerry Mansfield’s “Expired,” a twenty-page photo series whose substance is the physicality of discarded and withdrawn library books. She brings the lens in close, showing worn edges and torn covers and photographing the ephemera of the library experience: the check-out cards and the paper pockets they went into

New Use for An Old Friend, the Date Stamp

From Colossal: I can’t remember the last time I saw the actual use of a rubber date stamp, most libraries exchanged them for fancy barcodes and other digital systems a decade ago. 

But Italian artist Federico Pietrella who lives and works in Berlin has a fantastic use for them in his paintings made from thousands of densely stamped ink dates. In his enormous ink artworks Pietrella always stamps the current date, thus each of his pieces contains a clear timeline of the days he worked on it, often spanning two months. You can see much more on his website and watch a brief interview with artist courtesy of Deutsche Welle. (via visual news)

Elvis Has Left The Building

...the Humes High School Library in Memphis, that is... with his library book, "The Courageous Heart: A Life of Andrew Jackson For Young Readers".

The circ card with 13-year old Elvis Presley's signature is going for more than $3,500 when it goes on sale on August 14.

Behind the scenes look at PBCLS's new RFID/sorting system

Here's a video showing how Palm Beach County is using an RFID/book sorting system at their branches:

Fundraiser to Pay Children's Fines

In Spokane, WA a group of civic and literary minded folks are planning a fundraiser to pay off the fines and fees on children's library cards so they can use them again. The local libraries block cards from use if they carry a balance of $10 or more. By paying off these fines, the group raises money for the library and opens up blocked cards so kids can once again borrow books.

Brief story.

Does Harvard Tell Yale? Last of the Ivies to Join Borrow Direct

From Yale: If the roughly 12.5 million volumes in Yale's libraries weren't enough for Yale students, they will now have access to 17 million more thanks to the Harvard Library. The decision comes nearly 10 years after the rest of the Ivy League began participating in the interlibrary sharing system Borrow Direct.

Harvard is the last Ivy League college to take part in the program, which allows students and staff to request volumes from other schools' libraries. There are more than 45 million volumes currently in the system.

Some, like professor of German art and culture Jeffrey F. Hamburger '79 GRD '87, who chaired a Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences library advisory committee, told the Crimson that the university had concerns its library would be a net lender rather than a borrower.

"That said, there are areas in which other libraries have stronger collections than we do, and I think time will tell whether it’s the right decision," he added.


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