Information Architecture

Killing It With Legislation, Not Force

Rik Myslewski reports in The Register that Wikipedia is looking at a possible upcoming blackout. Declan McCullagh at CNET notes that this is part of a possible protest response to the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act being debated by the United States Congress that has potential extraterritorial effects. Meanwhile, The Hill reports that Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt characterizes SOPA as criminalizing the fundamental structure of the Web and all its interlinked nature.

"It’s not law — it’s a kind of thuggery"

David Post over at the lawprof blog The Volokh Conspiracy writes about the Stop Online Piracy Act and some of the disturbing consequences if it were enacted in the United States. Any library, and if appropriate their parent organization, should consider the consequences Post outlines if that library provides Internet to users let alone staff.

How the Internet is Ruining Everything

(Books by David Weinberger)

The ongoing argument about whether the Internet is a boon or a bust to civilization usually centers on the Web’s abundance. With so much data and so many voices, we each have knowledge formerly hard-won by decades of specialization. With some new fact or temptation perpetually beckoning, we may be the superficial avatars of an A.D.D. culture.

David Weinberger, one of the earliest and most perceptive analysts of the Internet, thinks we are looking at the wrong thing. It is not the content itself, but the structure of the Internet, that is the important thing. At least, as far as the destruction of a millennia-long human project is concerned.

Full article

RIP Steve Jobs

Wikipedia Editathon

A Bookshelf the Size of the World

From the Boston Globe:

As the digitization of human culture accelerates, publishers and academics have had to begin addressing a basic question: Who will control knowledge in the future?

So far, the most likely answer to that question has been a private company: Google. Since 2004 Google Books has been scanning books and putting them online; the company says it has already scanned more than 15 million. Google estimates there are about 130 million books in the world, and by 2020, it plans to have scanned them all.

Now, however, a competitor may be emerging. Last year, Robert Darnton, a cultural historian and director of Harvard University’s library system, began to raise the prospect of creating a public digital library. This library would include the digitized collections of the country’s great research institutions, but it would also bring in other media - video, music, film - as well as the collection of Web pages maintained by the Internet Archive.

Violate Terms & Conditions, Get Indicted

The Bits Blog online with The New York Times reports that programmer Aaron Swartz was indicted for allegedly stealing 4 million documents from MIT and JSTOR. According to documents posted to Scribd, the arrest warrant cites alleged violation of 18 USC 1343, 18 USC 1003(a)(4), 18 USC 1003(a)(2), 18 USC 1003(a)(5)(B), and 18 USC 2. The Boston Globe summed up the charges stating:
Aaron Swartz, 24, was charged with wire fraud, computer fraud, unlawfully obtaining information from a protected computer, and recklessly damaging a protected computer. He faces up to 35 years in prison and a $1 million fine.
Activist group Demand Progress, of which Swartz previously served as Executive Director, has a statement posted. Internet luminary Dave Winer also has a thought posted as to the indictment. Wired's report cites the current Executive Director of Demand Progress as likening the matter to checking too many books out of a library. (h/t Evan Prodromou and Dave Winer) (Update at 1641 Eastern: The Register has reporting here)

LISTen: An Program -- Episode #153

(Posted early by direction of The Producer) This week's episode features an interview with Patrick Frey of Patterico's Pontifications about the recent Blogger disruption and an unseemly incident that arose from it. An essay and a news miscellany are also featured. Related links: Ed Bott: Blogger outage makes case against cloud-only strategy Instapundit on the outage at the Ann Althouse blog Patterico: On nitecruzr and the memory hole Patterico: The full support thread saved from expurgation Google's copy of the support thread with expurgations bin Laden and mechanical backhaul for e-mail The Register on the bin Laden e-mail cache Wizzy Digital Courier, a lab set-up solution that can use mechanical backhaul Evan Prodromou highlighting the launch of Open Font Library and Open Clip Art Library 3.0 Dave Winer on super-injunctions GigaOm on super-injunctions Dave Winer on Web 2.0 Expiration Date National Review Online's Media Blog on New York Times online traffic Library of Congress press office announcing awards in federal librarianship CBC News: Kutcher to join Two and a Half Mean

Other found things...

BILL CLINTON IS A XXXXXXXXXXXXX -- Midwest Conservative Journal
Coyle's InFormation: Dystopias
"Really, if we don't do this, the future of libraries and research will be decided by Google. There, I said it."
Voices for the Library» Blog Archive » Are volunteers happy to run libraries?
Senate bill gives feds power to order piracy site blacklisting
Rutgers team proposes Net alternative
Rutgers team proposes Net alternative
Spammer-in chief? | Gene Healy | Beltway Confidential | Washington Examiner
New graphics engine imperils users of Firefox and Chrome
CILIP | Clear messages
New resources to demonstrate value of further education libraries
The Business Rusch: Writing Like It’s 1999 | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
The Business Rusch: Advocates, Addendums, and Sneaks, oh my! | Kristine Kathryn Rusch
How Robber Barons hijacked the "Victorian Internet"

Creative Commons License
Excluding United States Government content incorporated herein, LISTen: An Program -- Episode #153 by The Air Staff of Erie Looking Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

This Data Isn’t Dull. It Improves Lives.

The private sector can often reformat government information in ways that help consumers, workers and companies.

Full article in the NYT


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