Intellectual Property

InfoEthics 2000 Conference Papers

UNESCO just had its INFOETHICS 2000 conference in Paris, the Third UNESCO Congress on Ethical, Legal and Social Challenges of Cyberspace. A number of papers are available from the conference, some in English. They are available here. The list of papers is as follows:

The information society and the expectation revolution
by David Konzevik

The changing shape of information and the role of government
by Thomas B. Riley

Public sector information initiatives in the European Union
by George Papapavlou

Access to information and \"public domain\" in the post-\"perestroyka\" Russia: a paradoxal experience.
by Ekaterina U.Genieva

Access to telecommunications in the internet age
Arthur Levin

Accessibility to rural and remote areas
by Yasuhiko Kawasumi

Networks and information services: government policy
by Jean-Noël Tronc

Fair use and access to information in the digital era
by Carlos M. Correa

Copyright and its limitations in the digital environment
by Bernt Hugenholtz

How Can Fair Use Doctrine Be Applied For the Appropriate Level of Copyright Protection in the Global Marketplace?
by Euisun Yoo

Preserving fair use in the digital age
by Barry Steinhardt

Copyright and the freedom of accessing information in the cyberspace
by Andras Szinger

Ten commandments to protect privacy in the Internet world
by Hansjuergen Garstka

The legal protection of the right of privacy on the networks
by Amr Zaki Abdel Motaal

The future of privacy : David and Goliath revisited
by Simon Davis

Human dignity in the cyberspace society
by Adama Fofana

Interception capabilities 2000
by Duncan Campbell

Once again, the papers are at

Your Website Is Now Our Book

Brian The Laughin Librarian writes \" has a Story

It\'s that old story, once again:

Guy gets publisher for book version of website.
Guy gets publisher\'s competitor to sponsor website.
Guy gets taken to court by publisher.
Website gets taken down.

Will there be a happy ending? \"

Guy\'s Website

More Stupid Trademarks

Wired has a Story on the company Gemstar-TV Guide International, which licenses the technology for e-books to Thomson Mulitmedia, appling to trademark the stand-alone word \"EBOOK\" as well as the name \"Gemstar EBOOK\". I think I\'ll trademark the word book.

\"The term e-book has a generic meaning in the industry and to the general public, said trademark lawyer Laura Hein of the Minneapolis law firm Gray Plant Mooty. She said a fundamental principle of trademark law is that in order to qualify, the word one chooses needs to identify the source of the product or the services rather than the product or the service itself. \"

Legislating Property of the Mind

Wired has an Interview with Representative Howard Berman who is the ranking Democrat on the House subcommittee on courts and intellectual property. He talks about the important issues in this area today.

\"The original vision of copyright law that is specifically referenced in our Constitution was designed to create a system that creators of tangible property, of books and other art forms, have a period of time where they can get compensated for that effort. They are given a property right in their creation on the theory that if that didn\'t happen, nobody would have the incentive to create anymore. It was just a simple recognition of the need to have some protection as an incentive to creators.

Would Holly? Hollywood.

Brian writes \"In a Column about the DMCA and related issues, Paul Somerson of Ziff Davis Smart Business says:
\"If Hollywood could ban public libraries, you know they would.\"

This is a very interesting piece indeed, every time I read something about the DMCA I just want to cry.

\"Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), an evil legislative bludgeon rammed through Congress by the Clinton administration, that prevents access to anything that\'s copyrighted unless you have the explicit permission of the owner. This essentially guts \"fair use\" of the material, and outlaws any attempt to break copy protection or encryption, or even reverse engineer anything.\"

Library Juice Copyright Supplement

This week, Library Juice issued a pathfinder on copyright issues as a supplement. It inludes links to numerous articles and sites you may not have seen if you are interested in copyright, and a full article by Mark Anderson from EXTRA!, which I am copying here, with permission:

You\'ve Been Aggregated!

Speaking of linking lawsuits and the like, I\'ve been focusing on the general phenomenon of content aggregators this week. My take is that history smiles on the aggregator even if courts don\'t in the short term.

I\'ve cobbled together some recent news links with some of my own commentary in this week\'s Traffick Weekly.

Free-lancers sue database companies

Ron Force writes \"The San Francisco Chronicle has astory about free-lance authors suing Northern Lights, Gale Group, and ProQuest for payment of royalities on full text articles sold by publishers without permission. A similar group in New York has used the above, plus Reed-Elsevier. UnCover settled with the authors for $7.5 milion in back royalities. \"

Intellectual Property Is an Oxymoron

We just don\'t have enough intellectual property stories.Here\'s One from on how the Web has killed IP.

\"Technology is forcing us to re-evaluate the legal notion of intellectual property. The original compromise struck for the good of society has become unbalanced, and the reactions from the situation\'s current beneficiaries to counter this unrest have only disturbed the situation more. Copyright as it now stands has outlived its original purpose, and is no longer clearly beneficial to society as a whole. New business models must emerge, and are already emerging, to replace the old. \"

Against intellectual property

Against intellectual property is an interesting chapter out of the book Information Liberation by Brian Martin. This chapter is interesting in that he makes a strong case against IP. It\'s a long and well argued chapter.

\"There is a strong case for opposing intellectual property. Among other things, it often retards innovation and exploits Third World peoples. Most of the usual arguments for intellectual property do not hold up under scrutiny.


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