Intellectual Property

NY Times blacklists Tasini supporters

Fiona writes \"Village Voice reports that writers who were plaintiffs in the New York Times vs Tasini case have been blacklisted by the Times. The names of 13 writers are on the list. Nice to see that the paper has resolved this issue constructively!

More Here \"

Post-Boycott Scientific Publishing: The First Wave

Here\'s a press release from BioMed Central with information on the first free, peer-review scientific journals to emerge in the wake of the Public Library of Science boycott:

Today BioMed Central announces the first group of research journals to be launched in a new publishing initiative. This initiative is designed to allow groups of researchers to publish online journals representing their community and to offer free access to the research articles within these new journals. The journals will use BioMed Central\'s established publishing infrastructure, comprising an online submission system, electronic tools for peer-review, and the ability to publish accepted articles in both PDF and HTML formats. The peer-reviewed research articles in these journals will be indexed in the National Library of Medicine\'s bibliographic database, PubMed (widely used by researchers, clinicians and the general public) and deposited without delay in PubMed Central, the electronic repository of complete publications. . .

More. Thanks to the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog.

A New Model for Scientific Publishing?

The Public Library of Science will soon launch several free online journals. These titles are intended to showcase the work of scientists participating in a boycott of publishers that do not place articles in the public domain within six months of publication:

Thousands of scientists around the world will soon be boycotting academic journals that refuse to make their contents freely available on the web soon after publication. The boycott could mean scientists refusing to submit papers to journals and refusing to review the work of their peers for any journal that does not deposit research papers into an online public library of science.

The group behind the online library is planning its own online journals to give scientists who join the boycott a forum for their work. . .

More from BBC News.

The Purpose of Copyright

Jim writes \"I found this one on here you don\'t seem to have it yet. The author, Lydia Pallas Loren, says relatively few people, including lawyers, have sufficient knowledge or understanding of what copyright is and tries to explain it. \"
She goes on to say \"These misconceptions are causing a dangerous shift in copyright protection, a shift that threatens the advancement of knowledge and learning in this country.\", she does a great job explaining copyright law and The Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

L. M. Wadin passed along This Sad Story from over at Salon. If you need yet another reason to hate the DMCA read it. Being Sued for Bootlegging Practices of Napster, may not be directly responsible for the violations committed by Napster and other file swapping organizations, but they\'re being held responsible for it anyway. The claim: It was they who started the trend and gave the world the tools to commit copyright infringement. Guilty by association? more... from The Houston Chronicle. Nashville is also suing MP3 for $25 million. more... from The Tennessean.

Technology Puts a Lock on CDs

For BBC News, David Schepp writes...

\"Sharing music recorded on compact discs among friends over the internet has proven itself to be as American as apple pie and baseball. But music-swapping is a pastime that may be soon halted if recording companies have their way. Some major record labels have have signed on with encryption firms that have developed technologies to halt the
so-called pirating of copyrighted music. For the encryption companies it may mean millions of dollars in profits as record label after record label signs on to take advantage of the new, seemingly perfected technology. For the record companies, however, it could be a public relations disaster.\" more...

Library Enforcers Defending Copyright in Jordan

According to this story in the Jordan Times, Mamoun Talhouni, the new director of the National Library in Jordan, will send a team of library personnel out to inspect stores selling music, computer software, and other items. Any items found without valid licenses will be confiscated and the store owners\' case referred to prosecutors.

Are Libraries the Next Napster?

Junk e-mail goddess strikes again. See what you miss when you\'re on vacation? It took me like 2 days to find the link to this from an e-mail message. God knows I\'d hate to be accused of lifting something verbatim. Anyway, every now and again, library stuff makes it into major news publications. Anyone seen Time lately? Someone is suggesting that we may be the next Napster. How so? Weren\'t we here first? Like over a hundred years first? more... if you really want it.

Dmitry Sklyarov: Friend of Publishers?

Open Source Definition author Bruce Perens argues that Dmitry Sklyarov has done publishers a favor by exposing the glaring flaws in the encryption software they trust to protect their content:

E-book publishers might think of jailed Russian cryptanalyst Dimitry Sklyarov as their worst enemy... until they see his slide show. While publishers fret over the potential of illegal copies of their books, Sklyarov\'s presentation reveals that they could be ripped off in an unexpected way: by producers of astonishingly inept cryptography software. Sklyarov is in jail for revealing that secret. [More from ZDNet.]

Thanks to Robot Wisdom.

Returning Scientific Publishing to Scientists

The Public Library of Science-organized boycott of journals not allowing free distribution after six months of the articles they\'ve published begins September 1. Here\'s a useful round-up of those pushing for freer, cheaper distribution of scientific information:

Out of old bookes, in good faithe,
Cometh al this new science that men lere.

--Geoffrey Chaucer, The Assembly of Fowles
Taking License

As Chaucer\'s \"old bookes\" give way to the Information Age, I\'ve been asking myself whether or not these books -- and today, principally journals -- have morphed into something else entirely. Scientific communication is increasingly driven by factors that have little to do with researchers and more to do with commercial publishers\' profits. Even amid talk of the Internet-driven rise of scientific publishing, the researcher and the lab -- where scientific communication originates -- seem to be forgotten entirely. Restoring the researcher in research publishing requires long-term, cultural shifts to right the balance in favor of the scientist.

(More from the Journal of Electronic Publishing. Thanks again to New Breed.)


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