Cartoons

Manga beating out Marvel(tm)

Fang-Face writes "There is an interesting article entitled
U.S. Teenage Girls Prefer Japanese Heroes, by Grady Hendrix, Women's eNews, reposted to AlterNet.org's Wiretap. In it, Hendrix describes how "Shojo", manga for girls, is filling a void in the American comic book industry, which is still not developing the comic book market for girls. Hendrix focuses on the recent launch of Shojo Beat, writing that it is the manga equivalent of Harry Potter."

Picture books: Graphic novels bring stories to life

Anonymous Patron writes "One more on the allure of graphic novels, this time from The Knight Ridder Newspapers Wire. They say no bones about it, graphic novels are a hot new trend for young readers. They talk a bit with Artist and author Jeff Smith who is the talent behind the "Bone" series, a popular book series for teens and adults that has been repackaged in a new size for young readers."

Denver Library Yanks Spanish Books

The Associated Press Reports library workers are pulling thousands of Spanish-language comic books from the shelves following complaints of pornographic and violent content while officials determine whether some books should be permanently removed.

About 6,500 "fotonovelas," popular in Mexico and other Latin American countries, have been temporarily recalled from Denver Public Library branches, library spokeswoman Celeste Jackson said on Thursday. The review could be completed by next week.

Sexy comic books in Spanish pulled from Denver libraries

Sexually explicit Spanish-language comic books are being removed from Denver library shelves and sent to downtown headquarters for inspection, library officials said Thursday.

The books, called fotonovelas, were flagged by talk-radio host Peter Boyles this week. The KHOW- AM Web site Thursday had the headline: "Shocking Content Found on Denver Public Library Shelves."

Rocky Mountain News Has More

Rex Libris, Head Librarian

A new comic book is just hitting the shelves. Rex Libris is, "The astonishing story of the incomparable Rex Libris, Head Librarian at Middleton Public Library, and his unending struggle against the forces of ignorance and darkness." You can read some of his adventures here and an interview with the creator here. Schweet!

Japanese manga takes humongous step

Yahoo! News has one on CosmoGIRL. The August CosmoGIRL!, on newsstands this week, offers its 6 million readers the debut of a monthly manga strip, the Japanese-style comic.

The Adventures of CG, a collaboration with manga giant TokyoPop, stars CG, a college sophomore who lives in Tokyo. The publisher calls her a "spunky every-girl hipster heroine" drawn with the typical manga oversized eyes.
CG's arrival is one example of how the big manga publishers are stepping up their presence in the U.S. marketplace by marrying their comic form with novelizations, magazines and manga/novel hybrids.

Is There A Future For Comic Books?

Anonymous Patron writes "Despite the success of the recent crop of super hero films , it's no secret that the increased interest in those characters hasn't exactly translated into a dramatic upswing in the sales of the comic books that spawned them.

So, IGN.com asks why aren't more moviegoers flocking to their local comic book shops or online to start picking up the monthly adventures of the characters they just spent ten bucks to see on the big screen? One of the reasons can be traced back to the creation of the sell-thru titles back in the early '80s with the release of Dazzler #1 by Marvel Comics in 1981"

Complex comics: the new teen lit

Anonymous Patron writes to share this story with us from Lancaster, PA.

Graphic novels "They inspire teens to read, especially teen boys, a hard audience to reach."

"Among Ephrata’s selection: “The Books of Magic,� by Neil Gaiman (one of the most popular U.S. authors); “The Tale of One Bad Rat,� by Bryan Talbot; and “Marmalade Boy,� by Wataru Yoshizumi."

[Also, don't miss the "back talk" on this article!- A.K.]

My What Big Eyes You Have

GregS* writes "Here's a press release via Captain Comics: who announced today a content licensing agreement with Dark Horse Comics, which will see the comics publisher release Harlequin books in manga format in the United States, Canada, U.K. and Australia.Under the agreement, DARK HORSE will publish manga adaptations of six topselling Harlequin titles under the Harlequin Ginger Blossom banner. Harlequin Ginger Blossom will be divided into two color-coded lines-a "pink" line, which is aimed at younger readers, and a "violet" line, intended for more sophisticated readers. The agreement is a six-book deal-three books for each line-with a title from each line arriving approximately every three months."

Super adaptations? Some comic book fans like film adaptations, but others don't

Our superheroes are jumping from comic book pages to the movie screen in increasing numbers, and comic fans have mixed feelings about it.

In many cases, they're happy with the transition. But sometimes they feel films destroy the spirit of the books.

Movie adaptations of "The Fantastic Four" and the Batman series are due out this summer, on the heels of the recent release of Frank Miller's "Sin City," with Hollywood hoping to match the big bank it attained with the earlier "Spider-Man" and "X-Men" films.
MOre Here.

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