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And Dancing in the Streets...

Following up on our story last month, today's New York Times features a photo of Chile's President Michelle Bachelet dancing with the librarian who invited her to join him in La Cueca.

President Bachelet is a pediatrician and a single mother. Her unorthodox style has left a mark on the country’s political culture. During her state of the nation address in May, she joked about losing a shoe while kicking a soccer ball at a stadium inauguration, saying investment in four new stadiums would include money for “the flying shoe.” In the recent interview, she joked that her gender parity plan for the cabinet was intended to ensure that everyone had a dance partner.

Flash Dancing at the library

South Dublin's County Library gets in the groove with a Flash(mob)Dance, as reported by Library.ie. Looks like great fun!

New Zealand Gets Local Libraries Focus From Local Governments Minister

Sean Murgatroyd wrote at The Room of Infinite Diligence that the local governments minister has directed local councils to regard libraries as core services as well as a few other functional areas. Murgatroyd pointed out that this came from a postcard campaign launched by LIANZA.

(h/t The Room of Infinite Diligence...you ARE subscribed to their RSS feed, aren't you?)

A Mighty Wind

This is an amazing interview clip. Take the eight minutes to watch it. My comments on it are afterward (and might make more sense after viewing the clip than without).

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/wed-october-7-2009/william-kamkwamba

(Note: I can't get the video to display properly on the entry. So, please follow the link.)

It’s a great story about a young man who found something at the library that set off a chain of events that changed his village. It’s also a great story for librarians as an example of the importance of information access. Without access, our collections mean virtually little or nothing. Even with William’s limited access to library materials, he was able to find a piece of information that was of interest to him.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Frankfurt Book Fair Opens Today With China as Major Focus

BERLIN — Organizers of the Frankfurt Book Fair worked for 15 years to secure China as the guest of honor at their five-day showcase of global trends and best sellers that opens to industry delegates Wednesday. Organizers are steeling themselves for lively discussions and the possibility of protests at the fair, which boasts about 6,900 exhibitors from more than 100 countries.

In her speech inaugurating the 61-year-old event, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said, "There can be — and I am sure there will be — no taboos in discussions" at the fair. But the director of the German Book Sellers Industry, Gottfried Honnefelder, went one step further insisting that: "We view freedom of opinion as an inalienable right."

In September, members of the Chinese delegation walked out of a pre-book fair symposium after two authors they had insisted not attend showed up anyway. Yet China's appearance this year is expected to generate the most buzz, given censorship in China. The September spat erupted when dissident writers Dai Qing and Bei Ling attended the symposium, despite a Chinese attempt to block them.

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping praised the fair for presenting a chance for an exchange in learning about each other's cultures.

WWII G.I. Returns German Books to Archives

After 64 years, veteran Robert E. Thomas returns books that he took from a salt mine in Germany during WWII that contained national treasures hidden by the Nazis. Both books were incunabula, one written in Latin and one in German. The National Archives facilitated the transfer.

Story and video from The Washington Post.

It Takes A Librarian

Chile's President Michelle Bachelet has celebrated her 58th birthday by dancing a traditional Chilean cueca — with a library worker who plucked up the courage to ask.

Bachelet was inaugurating a library in the Santiago district of Cerrillos on Tuesday when she was surprised by a group of musicians who played a "cueca brava" — a popular version of Chile's folkloric dance — for her birthday. While the musicians sang, a library worker asked Chile's president to dance — and she accepted. LA Times.

Fury as Gardener is Appointed Assistant Librarian

Library hiring can be problematic no matter the location.

In South Africa, concerned residents of Tzaneen in Limpopo have called for an investigation into the municipality’s decision to appoint a gardener as library assistant.

The residents claim the gardener was appointed at the Haenertzburg library though she does not have a matric certificate.

The gardener, whose name is known to Sowetan [ed- why aren't they reporting it?] reportedly attended interviews but did not qualify for the position.

But, the chief librarian of Haenertzburg, Mienie de Villiers, allegedly recommended that she be appointed. More from Sowetan.

Library Parks in Medellín Colombia

From librarian Aaron Schmidt (via facebook and Aaron's website):

The five library parks in Medellín, Columbia are amazing and not just because of their architecture.

Included in the network are five library parks, known as “hearts of knowledge.” Located throughout the city in some of Medellin’s most marginalized communities, the library parks have become cultural centers, providing broad, community access to information and educational resources. The network’s libraries offer a range of training programs, including how to use the computer and access information online, and English for the Internet.


More photos here.

The project was recently awarded the 2009 Access to Learning Award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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