Internet

HTTP Archive: past and future

The HTTP Archive crawls the world’s top 500K URLs twice each month and records detailed information like the number of HTTP requests, the most popular image formats, and the use of gzip compression. We also crawl the top 5K URLs on real iPhones as part of the HTTP Archive Mobile. In addition to aggregate stats, the HTTP Archive has data (including waterfalls, filmstrips and video) for individual websites, for example, Apple, CNet, and YouTube.

From HTTP Archive: past and future | High Performance Web Sites

Topic: 

Just say no to Facebook's Internet.org, says inventor of WWW

HIGHLIGHTS
• Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, has attacked Facebook’s Internet.org
• Berners-Lee said people in emerging markets should “just say no” to the project
• He said the initiative was not internet and that there were other ways of reducing the price of access

From Just say no to Facebook's Internet.org, says inventor of World Wide Web - Times of India

Topic: 

The Chaotic Wisdom of Wikipedia Paragraphs

No. These are all excellent matters to ponder, especially given Wikipedia’s global dominance, and I do ponder them, and perhaps you do as well. But what is genuinely most fascinating, at least to me, is the strange way it lets you write encyclopedia pages—the structures that have built up since its founding in 2001. The way that Wikipedia is composed is a good example of what happens when you build something so incredibly simple that anyone can use it, and then everyone does.

From The Chaotic Wisdom of Wikipedia Paragraphs | The New Republic

Topic: 

Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late

IPFS is a new peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol that aims to supplement, or possibly even replace, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol that rules the web now. Here’s the problem with HTTP: When you go to a website today, your browser has to be directly connected to the computers that are serving that website, even if their servers are far away and the transfer process eats up a lot of bandwidth.

From Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late | TechCrunch

The Future of the Internet Is Flow

The Future of the Internet Is Flow
Forget the clunky Web. The future of the online world will be a river of information flowing through time

From The Future of the Internet Is Flow - WSJ

Topic: 

ECPA reform: The 1986 email privacy law might finally get updated.

federal law protects some of your email from government snooping without a warrant. But it doesn’t protect your email if it’s been left on a server for too long, and, worse, it doesn’t protect your metadata—information that can get you arrested and prosecuted, that can reveal intimate secrets about you, and that would expose the entire network of people you talk to. On Wednesday the Senate Judiciary Committee is set to address the first problem, but reform efforts in both houses of Congress have largely passed over the second issue. In dodging the problem of metadata, legislators have missed the forest for the twigs.

From ECPA reform: The 1986 email privacy law might finally get updated.

Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web

Google is working with the social media service Twitter and major news publishers like The Guardian and The New York Times to create a new kind of web link and article storage system that would load online news articles and digital magazine pieces in a few milliseconds, according to several people involved in the project. That is a fraction of the five to 10 seconds it can take to load a typical website.

From Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web - The New York Times

Topic: 

First Library to Support Tor Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email

A library in a small New Hampshire town started to help Internet users around the world surf anonymously using Tor. Until the Department of Homeland Security raised a red flag.

From First Library to Support Tor Anonymous Internet Browsing Effort Stops After DHS Email - ProPublica

The Bibliotheca Anonoma

The Bibliotheca Anonoma is a research library tasked with collecting, documenting, and safeguarding the grand legacy of Internet Folklife: The shared experiences of mankind in a limitless digital network, a virtual universe which has engendered civilizations, culture, trade... and warfare.

From Home · bibanon/bibanon Wiki

Electronic Noise Is Drowning Out the Internet of Things

Radio-frequency noise pollution is everywhere. You can’t see, hear, taste, or smell this noise, of course. Nor can you summon it and study it at your leisure, because it comes and goes along with the movements of its sources or its victims.

From Electronic Noise Is Drowning Out the Internet of Things - IEEE Spectrum

Pages

Subscribe to Internet