Internet

Teens can't tell the difference between Google ads and search results | The Verge

The familiar narrative of teens and technology is one of natural proficiency — that young people just get technology in a way that older generations don't. But research suggests that just because children feel at home using smartphones, it doesn't mean they're more aware of the nuances of how the web works.

From Teens can't tell the difference between Google ads and search results | The Verge

Children and parents: Media use and attitudes report 2015

From Children and parents: Media use and attitudes report 2015 | Ofcom

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Online Services Of Yesteryear

Before we were watching Netflix movies, video-conferencing with our friends, and playing real-time video games on the Internet, we were using online services, such AOL, CompuServe, and GEnie to talk about movies, type letters to our buddies, and play ASCII, turn-based games.

From ​Before the Web: Online services of yesteryear | ZDNet

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Internet Archive! How You Can Put Knowledge into the Hands of Millions

Today is #GivingTuesday, the one day you are encouraged to give to your favorite charities. This GivingTuesday, I hope the Internet Archive will be at the top of your list. By giving a small amount, you can put knowledge in the hands of millions of people, for years and years.

From How You Can Put Knowledge into the Hands of Millions | Internet Archive Blogs

The Internet Isn't Available in Most Languages

At the moment, the Internet only has webpages in about five percent of the world's languages. Even national languages like Hindi and Swahili are used on only .01 percent of the 10 million most popular websites. The majority of the world’s languages lack an online presence that is actually useful.

From The Internet Isn't Available in Most Languages - The Atlantic

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The Irony of Writing About Digital Preservation - The Atlantic

Last month, The Atlantic published a lengthy article about information that is lost on the web. That story itself is in jeopardy.

From The Irony of Writing About Digital Preservation - The Atlantic

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How search engines make us feel smarter than we really are

The latest research suggest that though technology probably doesn’t make us stupid, it can, however, cause us to believe that we are smarter than we really are. Knowing you can search the internet is similar to knowing that you can consult a dictionary or a home encyclopedia or make a visit to the library when truly puzzled – but it’s different in that your brain, and the brains of every other cybercitizen, has become accustomed to the power to almost effortlessly reach into the internet and in a second or two bring back the info previously missing from your head, and you can do that mid-conversation, or while driving, or in the subway or on the couch or in line for a concert. That effortlessness and in-our-pockets availability seems to deeply affect how we categorize what is in our heads and what is not. When we consider all there is to know about a given subject, the convenience of search engines seems to blur the way we think about what we do and do not personally know about the world.

From How search engines make us feel smarter than we really are / Boing Boing

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Firefox maker Mozilla: We don't need Google's money anymore

The organization once banked on the millions that Google paid for search traffic from the Firefox browser. Now it relies on Yahoo, Baidu and others, and it expects revenue to grow.

From Firefox maker Mozilla: We don't need Google's money anymore - CNET

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The Secret Power of ‘Read It Later’ Apps

I’m not talking about basic literacy. What has become exceedingly scarce (and therefore, valuable) is the physical, emotional, attentional, and mental capability to sit quietly and direct focused attention for sustained periods of time.

From The Secret Power of ‘Read It Later’ Apps — Forte Labs — Medium

The Internet Is a Series of Lead Tubes

“Maybe people will look back on what we think is the really important part of the internet, all the memey stuff and the social networks and the places where people are making all this money, and they will look back on it the way we look back on the use of lead plumbing on the part of the aristocracy in ancient Rome. Which, to them this was like ‘Oh my god this is the sign you’ve arrived, this is where the action is, we have plumbing and it’s awesome!’ And it was! It was this amazing technological infrastructure. It was beautifully made, it provided them with an incredibly high standard of living and it also slowly, gradually made them irretrievably sick and insane*. It poisoned them day by day.

From The Last Word On Nothing | The Internet Is a Series of Lead Tubes

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The Wayback Machine Is Getting a Search Engine

The Wayback Machine is knowledge storage on a colossal scale: maintained by the Internet Archive, it’s a repository of how everything looked on the internet in the past. But the biggest libraries are the hardest to organize, which is why $2 million is being spent to give the Wayback Machine its very own Google.

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation announced yesterday that it’s donating $1.9 million to develop a search engine for the Wayback Machine. Why should you care?

From The Wayback Machine Is Getting a Search Engine

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