Internet

AOL offers free service to schools

CNN.com has an Article about children getting the internet while at school.

\"Students will see no ads -- other than the AOL logo -- will not be able to purchase goods online and will be blocked from accessing pornography or other offensive material. Students will be able to send e-mail and instant messages to encourage group online activities or to establish pen pals at distant schools.

No marketing information would be gathered on students because they only use their first name and a password to access the service, AOL said.\"  -- Read More

Half the web is dead

A Story from The BBC reports a new study done by IBM, Compaq and Altavista, estimates that only 30% of all web pages make up a heavily interconnected core which most of the search engines index. They dubbed the core the \'giant strongly connected component\'.
They say that it can take hundreds of clicks to reach some web pages and others cannot be reached at all.
Of course this contradicts work carried out by Alberto-Laszlo Barabasi from the University of Notre Dame that suggested it took a maximum of 19 clicks to get from one side of the web to the other. You can check out the study Here. They call it the \"Bow Tie\" Theory.\"The result is the development of the \"Bow Tie\" Theory. One of the initial discoveries of this ongoing study shatters the number one myth about the Web ... in truth, the Web is less connected than previously thought. \" -- Read More

Largest Newspapers are now all online

MeidaINFO.com has this Report

\"By this summer, all of the nation\'s 100 largest
newspapers will offer news content online,
according to a new survey by E&P Online. The
one straggler, Investor\'s Business Daily, plans to
launch a new site with daily content by early
summer.\" -- Read More

Expert Goulash with a Donut on the Side

David Plotnikoff, staff writer for the San Jose Mercury News, notices that \"on the Net there is no shortage of structures to facilitate the orderly transfer of advice from the clued to the clueless. ... Every recreational pursuit from water ballet to weasel husbandry seems to command at least one Web site that\'s well-populated with professional experts and eager kibitzers of all stripes.\" -- Read More

IE hole exposes your private data

This article
from
Cnet is one of many around reporting the your cookies in IE are open for all to see. Check out peacefire.org for a demonstration.


Even though the majority of the LISNews viewers use Netscape (librarians love Netscape?), this security hole is still good to know. -- Read More

Verticals and Content Engines

Steve Matthews, publisher of BPubs.com, contributes this storyabout the future of vertical searching. -- Read More

Link Ban Threatens Free Speech

Wired has a disturbing Story on a recent court ruling.

\"Experts speaking in defense of hacker magazine 2600 say a ruling that prevents sites from linking to a
controversial DVD-descrambling utility imperils traditional free speech.

A federal judge should not order 2600.com to yank hyperlinks to the DeCSS program from its website
because it \"would constitute a gross prior restraint of speech,\" 2600 magazine says in court documents filed
Wednesday in U.S. District Court in New York. -- Read More

Metabrowsing Tool: Onepage

This Traffick interview showcases Onepage, one amongst several \"metabrowsing\" tools. Metabrowsing is a newly-coined term for an activity that may someday gain a following: placing customized info from different websites into a single browser window. It\'s not exactly the same as a customized news page; some would say that it\'s better. Others might wonder if it\'s worth the trouble. Still others might just want to buy a couple of extra computers and leave them on all the time!

Other tools in this genre include Quickbrowse and Octopus. -- Read More

Expert Soup

Today on Traffick I offer this overview of services dispensing expert advice on the Internet. They now come in many different flavors. I\'m sure this only scratches the surface, so if you have other suggestions, please add a comment. -- Read More

The True Library of the Future?

This Story from Digital Mass puts an interesting spin on a new web site that offers to respond to a typed-in question with an answer and an attributed source, usually in as little as a tenth of a second. The Web site is Factcity.com and if they do indeed pull this off, could put a few Reference Librarians out of work. Check it out and let us know what you think. -- Read More

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