Internet

You Get What You Pay For

Infotoday cleared up the May 23 announcement from Web directory service LookSmart who said they signed an exclusive agreement with Gale Group. According to the release, they are going to make business and premium magazine and periodical content available for free. You may find the quantity of material actually delivered through the service to be, at least initially, a lot less than the press release leads one to believe. -- Read More

Book industry wrestles with electronic future

CNN.com has an interesting article about how people are using the electronic books now and missing the chance to walk around the bookstores to see what they have to offer.

\"He had just been asked what he thought of electronic books.

\"Does that mean you get shock treatment when you read?\" the actor wondered, shortly after speaking to a Sunday breakfast gathering at BookExpo America. -- Read More

Information Overload

Alistapart.com
has a nice little Story entitled \"Digiglut\". The Author says
\"there is just too much stuff out there. \", and says that
people are overwhelmed, and it\'s getting worse. He
never suggests letting librarians rule the WWW........ But
wouldn\'t it great if we did? -- Read More

Blind to truly free expression

Jon Katz worte a great Story at Freedom
Forum.org
on how people can over react when
faced with a new technology. He does a great job
explaining how the web has made free speach
possible for so many people.

\"The architecture of
the Internet, as it is right now,\" writes Lawrence Lessig,
a constitutional scholar at Harvard University, \"is
perhaps the most important model of free speech
since the founding [of the American republic]. -- Read More

Its Bibliography Lives in Cyberspace

The NY Times has a neat little Story on web based bibliographies.Publishing companines and authors are finding the web a nice place for bibliographies to live, leaving them out of books all together. The advantage, the publishers say, is a smaller, cheaper, more accessible book. -- Read More

Yahoo! Changed

I\'m not sure if this is news or not, but sometime today,
Yahoo! made
some big changes on Yahoo.com.I get all
confused when sites I use every day change things. I
think I liked the old version, but I suppose they know
better than me. That cute little baby has been replaced
by a baby chicken, or some damn bird.

Universal Access

Slashdot.org has an article from Jon Katz on Universal Access.

\"Universal Access is that rarest of social phenomena, the win-win issue. Except for moral guardians clucking about pornography and violent video games, who could really oppose it?: It can advance technology while it helps eliminate potentially bitter social divisions, upgrades literacy, education and research, liberates information, enhances democracy, strengthens community. Some companies even believes if strengthens family ties. It would make the Net a universal business, educational and social tool, rather than a network for the affluent, educated and technologically-inclined it is now. \" -- Read More

Looksmart to Liberate Premium Magazine Content from Hundreds of Publications

A new blog (OK it\'s a plug for my new weblog) called Traffick Notes passes on today\'s announcement from Looksmart: it plans to distribute a great deal of proprietary and premium content: magazine and periodical articles, reports, etc. for free through its distribution partners (which include Excite, Altavista, Time Warner, Netzero, etc.). Boy, this global media business can get confusing. -- Read More

Watching readers eyeballs

Anyone who does web sites must check out theStanford Poytner Project. They watched peoples eyes as they read news web pages. The eyes could be tracked as screens scrolled normally. They say this is the first such scrolling-screen eyetracking effort. They reached a few interesting conclusions.

Where do eyes go initially after firing up the first screenful of online news? To text, most likely. Also contrary to much current belief, we found that banner ads do catch online readers\' attention. For the 45 percent of banner ads looked at at all, our subjects\' eyes fixated (definition) on them for an average one second. That is long enough to perceive the ad. -- Read More

1 out of 10 kids use the web instead of reference books

The Guardian Unlimited.com has this story about a study released that states that 1 out of every 10 children now use the web to get reference information, and not books.
\"Almost one in 10 children have stopped using reference books and are relying on electronic sources - chiefly the internet - to get their information, according to the fullest study of national reading habits.
The report offers the first statistical evidence that a new generation of children growing up in the microchip era has markedly different attitudes to acquiring knowledge from those of their parents\" -- Read More

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