Open Science Online

The American Prospect has a Story on PubMed Central and The open-source approach to publishing on the internet.

\"The open-source business model takes explicit advantage of this dynamic. So could biomedicine. As digital networks develop, the role of the major medical journals as the exclusive purveyors of certain kinds of data may well become obsolete, but their role in framing and interpreting the data will be ever more in demand.\"


URLs Just Fade Away...

Lee Hadden writes:
\" A new study by Philip Davis and Suzanne Cohen of Cornell studied the
citation use of undergraduate students in Economics 101 over a period of
three years, 1996-1999. They found that most of the URLs are no longer
effective; that the use of printed book citations have dropped from 30% to
19%; that there has been a substantial increase in the use of popular,
un-referreed materials such as newspaper articles has increased from 7 to
19%, and that web citations have increased from 9 to 21%. Effectively,
scholarly use of library materials have dropped in favor of web-based
services available in the rooms of students. There is a need for college
professors to insist on greater use of refereed and academic resources by
their students.

Their research will be printed in a forthcoming article in the Journal
of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS), due Feb. 15, Vol.
52 (4). Read more about it- a preprint of the article is available at:


Dubya Exits the Information Superhighway

This Story
from Capitolhillblue
says President Bush has now \"exited the information
superhighway\" avoid having his e-mail become public,
something I\'m sure BIll Gates, and Bill Clinton wish
they would\'ve done.

     \"Now that presidential e-mail is subject to
open records, it\'s going to be a phone-call
relationship,\" Bush said.


Mining the \'Deep Web\' With Specialized Drills

The NYTimes has an Interesting Story on search engines. They say regular search engines have access to only a fraction of 1 percent of what exists on the Web and as many as 500 billion pieces of content are missed. They talk about specialty search engines like Moreover, a site I use all the time for LISNews. It\'s nice to see some very positive things said about librarians in this one.

\"People may know to come to the library, but they probably do not know which reference books to pull off the shelf. Of course, in such cases, patrons can at least consult a reference librarian. On the Web, people are usually fending for themselves.\"


That\'s my final search!!

My friend sent in this story from Wired. I don\'t mean to be crude, but the only difference between this game show and the \"actual\" daily life of a librarian is that the payoff is greater.\"Web Challenge has no rules regarding which search engine contestants use, or how many browser windows can be open simultaneously. Contestants bypass search engines and go directly to informational sites such as or the Internet Movie Database to get their answers. The first team to find the right answer wins $150. But if no one answers correctly within the two-minute time limit, the prize is forfeited.\"


Google Yourself A New Site

Wired has a nifty Little Story about a dude who lost his website, only to find it again on google.

\"That\'s when the light bulb went off,\" said Savin. \"I thought, wait a minute, they\'ve probably got my site.\"


The papa of protocol

There\'s a Neat Little Story about Vinton Cerf at The USA Today. He was co-inventor of protocols called TCP/IP that run the \'net, the first commercial e-mail system at MCI in the \'80s and co-founded the Internet Society in 1992.

They also have a cool Internet Quiz, for those internet history buffs out there. I love history that only goes back a few years.


Stories From The Great Divide

One-third of the overall U.S. population uses the Internet at home, compared to just 16% of Latinos and 19% of African Americans, according to recent U.S. Department of Commerce statistics. has grand plans to help close the digital divide.

While the LA Times says Minorities Use the Web Differently. African Americans were more likely than other groups to focus on career advancement and professional development, education, family and relationships and entertainment. Latinos were more likely to use the Internet as a major source of news content, particularly for international news.

Meanwhile in the UK the divide seems to be at Work as well, A survey of 200 large firms across Britain, conducted by KPMG\'s legal arm, KLegal, found that 30% did not provide staff below middle management level with internet access. That figure increased to 40% when specialist information technology firms were stripped out of the sample.
In a somewhat related story, BT is turning pay phones into temprarially free internet kiosks, Story Here.


Congressional Web Learning Report

The NY Times has a Story on The Commission on Web-based Education. They had
identified seven key points in its report on harnessing the learning power of the Internet.

\"If you throw a rock in Washington, D.C., you\'re bound to hit someone in favor of wide expansion of broadband -- there are lots of people pulling for it,\"


Berners-Lee On The Web has an Interview with Tim Berners-Lee on the past, present and future of the web. He worries the web may spin out of control.

``My worry is that we\'ll make a system that isn\'t conceptually clean enough . . . so that in 10 years time, we\'ll find the technology is limiting,\'\' he said.

He also says he wishes he didn\'t put the double slashes in URL\'s, they are a pain, aren\'t they?



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