Internet

The Effects of September 11 on Google

FirstMonday has an Interesting Story on Gooooogle and how they handled things on September, 11th.

They say this may have also changed how Google thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.


See also Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines and Search Resources About Terrorist Attacks both from Search Engine Watch

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PBS Announces American Field Guide-An Unprecedented Online Resource

PBS has created a great web site! This is a must see for
public reference staff. From the Press
Release
:
\"The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and Oregon Public
Broadcasting (OPB) announce the launch of the AMERICAN FIELD
GUIDE Web site (www.PBS.org/afg). This unparalleled initiative draws on the rich video libraries of
local public television stations, bringing users searchable access to
more than 1,000 online video clips comprising 150 hours of outdoors
productions. This content -- available together for the first time ever
-- ranges from cliff-climbing in Maine to an intriguing look at the life
of wolves in Yellowstone. An extensive resource area for educators
complements the easy-to-use site.

Nearly 30 local public television stations collaborated to provide
captivating outdoor video content, representing all 50
states.\"(It does require Real Player.)

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Writing for Search Engines

From Search Engine
Watch
comes this article about \"the subject of developing
content for a web site that maintains a good balance between
ranking well in the Search Engines and appeals to the intended
audience.\" This is a special report from the Search Engine
Strategies 2001 Conference, August 16-17, San Francisco CA.
Lots of
tips and links!

Full Story (scroll down the page a bit to the story)

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At Age 30, E-Mail Matures to Adulthood

Reuters reports about e-mail, first invented in 1971. A lot of
good information and history about e-mail.

\"Thirty years on, e-mail has become a vital form of communication
whose usefulness was demonstrated in the during the devastating
attacks on New York and Washington last month. \"

Full Story

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Cheating graduates a level

This Story from The Washington Times talks about how the age of the Internet has woven a host of new twists on the perennial problem of plagiarism. They say a 1998 poll of top U.S. high school students revealed that 80 percent had cheated — and 95 percent of those said they had escaped detection.

\"The only way to stop digital plagiarism,\" he says, \"is to create a centralized database of intellectual property that term papers can be checked against.\"

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Salon Begins to Charge for News, Political Coverage

Reuters reports that Salon.com will make you pay for
access to much of its content.
\"Salon.com had started charging for some of its stories and
features on its sites, but now \"virtually all\" its news and politics
items -- two areas the publisher has gained prominence for --
will be for a fee. A one-year subscription costs $30. \"

Full Story

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FTC Shuts Thousands of Deceptive Web Sites

From Reuters - The FTC shut down more than 5,500 sites and
domain names that grab you and won\'t let you go. But...they haven\'t
found the known suspect yet and he starts new sites as fast the FTC
shuts
them down.

Full Story

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Contentville.com Shutters Web Site

From AP, Contentville.com has closed. Couldn\'t get enough users.

Full Story

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webArchivist.org Still Archiving

There\'s more on webarchivist.org in The Washington Post, in case you missed the earlier stories we ran.
Volunteers from all over are joining the Library of Congress and Internet Archive in San Francisco to create a special digital archive, one that aims to re-create what appeared online in the hours, days and weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks. They plan to publish their re-creation on Oct. 11.


\"There is the potential for a new level of civic activism emerging,\" said Kirsten Foot, a professor at the University of Washington who is co-directing the effort. \"There\'s been a huge surge in people feeling compelled to make statements about the events online. We see it everywhere online, and we want to preserve a record of it.\"

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Library \'Blogs in the News

Marylaine Block has written a relatively high profile piece on library weblogs in which our own Blake Carver is quoted:

For many of the self-publishers, it\'s a chance to render a service, to fill a hole in the web of information. Jenny Levine was one of the first to do this, back in 1995, with her late lamented Librarians\' Site du Jour. \"I began it to bring home to the librarians in my system the power of this new tool,\" she says. \"The two biggest complaints I heard about the net were that people didn\'t have time for this new stuff, and, even if they did, they didn\'t know what to do once they got online. So my goal was twofold: 1) to highlight valuable resources, and 2) to give librarians a reason to go on the web every day . . . \"

More from Library Journal (registration required.)

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