Internet

Going Way Back

Cliff writes \"I tried using it, but it\'s way popular, and so I couldn\'t get in...Here\'s the news realease on it:


INTERNET ARCHIVE LAUNCHES WAYBACK MACHINE


Free Service Enables Users to Access Archived Versions of Web Sites Dating from 1996.
\"


They did archive LISNews from back a year or so, though not the Original Version of our site.

The rest of the release follows, for those who missed it before.

Topic: 

What\'s A hapax legomenon?

Have I ever told you how much I love Metafilter?

This Metafilter Post is a great discussion on
typing random words into Google to see what comes
back. It turns out there is a name for only getting one
result from a search engine (I know, it doesn\'t happen
much), hapax legomenon, is a word or
phrase of which there is only one recorded use.

They point out it\'s also being used in the context of
search engines, and that makes perfect sense to me.
They also point out an interesting web-only thing:

\"The beauty thing about a hapax legomenon is
that once you talk about it, it no longer exists. Once
google indexes this page, \"i am joe\'s spleen\" will return two
hits, and the hapax legomenon is no longer.\"

So, once google crawls this, and mefi, this will no
longer be a Hapax Legomenon!

Topic: 

Internet archive, the world\'s largest library

From the San Francisco Business Times comes this interview with Brewster Kahle, co-founder of San Francisco-based Internet Archive. The project, described as the world\'s largest library, goes live tomorrow.

\"Users will be able to type in the http://www.archive.org url into their browser and access 10 billion web pages dating back to 1996 when project leaders began their mission of preserving digerati.\"

Kahle admits, though, that the first thing people will probably search for will be their own corporate or personal web pages since \"people are always interested in themselves.\"

Topic: 

AOL, MSN, Yahoo Adopt Voluntary Web-Rating System

The Big-3 in Internet Land are going to allow voluntary ratings in order to give users the option to screen out objectionable content. Web site owners can submit information about their site\'s content and the Internet Content Rating Association (ICRA) will embed tags into the HTML code to ensure rating accuracy...that is, so long as the site owner is honest. more...

Topic: 

People Won\'t Pay For Content

The Guardian is running a Story on A report from Forrester Research that says rather than pay for something, users will simply switch to alternative, free services. There\'s a Press Release on Forrester.com, I couldn\'t seem to find the report, maybe someone else can.


\"Consumers access content when and where they need it, not when providers want to give it to them, and they won\'t pay for new media content since it doesn\'t eliminate their need for paid-for offline sources.\"

Topic: 

Bird\'s-Eye Views, Made to Order

Those who like GIS and mapping technology will want to read this
story from the New York Times. There is information about
satellite imaging and photography. Lots of links!
After the terrorist attacks \"...Space Imaging had taken the unusual
step of making images of the disaster sites available free on its Web
site, and some competitors had done likewise. \"We had so many
emergency groups calling that we decided to just put it out there so
they could use it as quickly as possible,\" said John Copple, chief
executive at Space Imaging, based in the Denver suburb of Thornton,
Colo.\"

Full Story

Topic: 

Time for a Net obituary or a celebration?

Mefi pointed me to This Awesome little OP-ED piece from Roger
Ebert.

He sums up what\'s going on very well, I think. He says all
is well with the web, I just hope he\'s right.

\"The Internet Bubble has been compared to the Tulip
Craze, when 17th-century investors bid the price of Dutch
bulbs to insane heights. Both bubbles burst. The collapse of
the Internet economy was inevitable, and clears the way for
sane and reasonable rebuilding. Good news: There are more
tulips in the world than ever before

Topic: 

\"Literature in Context\'\' Web Resource Will Help Chicagoans Understand Book

A neat web site for learning about literary classics.
From the press release:
\"While Chicagoans are reading To Kill a Mockingbird next week
during the city\'s ``One Book One Chicago\'\' program, they\'ll have an
award-winning resource at their public libraries that helps them to
understand the historical and social context in which the book was
written in the 1950s. \"

See the FULL
STORY
to learn how to access the site.

Topic: 

The Effects of September 11 on Google

FirstMonday has an Interesting Story on Gooooogle and how they handled things on September, 11th.

They say this may have also changed how Google thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.


See also Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines and Search Resources About Terrorist Attacks both from Search Engine Watch

Topic: 

PBS Announces American Field Guide-An Unprecedented Online Resource

PBS has created a great web site! This is a must see for
public reference staff. From the Press
Release
:
\"The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and Oregon Public
Broadcasting (OPB) announce the launch of the AMERICAN FIELD
GUIDE Web site (www.PBS.org/afg). This unparalleled initiative draws on the rich video libraries of
local public television stations, bringing users searchable access to
more than 1,000 online video clips comprising 150 hours of outdoors
productions. This content -- available together for the first time ever
-- ranges from cliff-climbing in Maine to an intriguing look at the life
of wolves in Yellowstone. An extensive resource area for educators
complements the easy-to-use site.

Nearly 30 local public television stations collaborated to provide
captivating outdoor video content, representing all 50
states.\"(It does require Real Player.)

Topic: 

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