A Peek @ The Web

Wired has Who Said the Web Fell Apart?. They say the Web was criticized for buckling under user demand and failing to provide help and information, but really it was merely a matter of knowing where to look. Sure, CNN and The NY Times crapped out for awhile, even Slashdot creaked along, but sites like Metafilter and Cam kept us up to date.
The FBI has also released a
cyberthreat advisory beef up physical and cybersecurity efforts.

CNN says Internet proves vital communications tool
, For many, one of the first reactions to the news of Tuesday\'s terrorist attacks was to turn to the Web.

The NYTimes also ran a Story that quoted Cam, and provided a nice look at how many different websites were doing.

\"The need to connect is intense,\" said Donna Hoffman, a professor who studies the Web and Web commerce at Vanderbilt University. \"While the network TV stations blather, the Internet carries the news and connects the masses in a true interactive sob.\"


Contrary to Early Reports, Web Shines During Crisis

Contrary to early reports that the Web buckled under the heavy traffic that followed the NYC/DC attacks, it appears to have provided a vital and flexible tool for communication. Wired\'s Leander Kahney writes:

The Web has been criticized in many corners for failing to adequately cover the unfolding horror of Tuesday\'s terrorist attacks in New York and Washington.

On a day when many people were glued to the TV, the complaint was that the Net initially failed to provide the kind of in-depth coverage available from the TV networks. People have complained that sites for the big news organizations, like CNN, The New York Times and the BBC, were unavailable for much of the day due to high traffic.
And what only newspapers and portals were available simply ran wire copy. But under the radar, the Net responded magnificently; it was just a matter of knowing where to look. Immediately after the attack, community websites, discussion groups and mailing lists immediately lit up with vast amounts of information about the attacks . . .

More, still more from CNN and even more from the Washington Post.


Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines

Danny Sullivan has posted Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines over at SearchEngine Watch.

This is both an analysis of how search engines reacted to the terrorist attacks in the United States and advice on how to find the latest information about the disaster..


eBay Pulls Twin Towers Related Items Until 10/1

eBay had a change of heart today and banned the sale of
NYC attack related items until at least 10/1:

In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in New York City on Tuesday, people on eBay were apparently bidding up the prices of World Trade Center memorabilia, attempting, they said, to find some items with which to remember the buildings now completely destroyed. Some less savory practices appeared to be going on as well, with people attempting to sell disaster-related domain names and debris scavenged from the attack -- but eBay had been vigilantly combating those practices, taking down the pages as fast as they could go up. . .

More from Wired.


Canadian MPs Largely Web-Illiterate?

An unofficial experiment by student, programmer, concerned citizen, and Canadian Brendan Wilson suggests that many members of Parliament may not be aware of the importance of the Web:

Overall the experiment demonstrated that the average Canadian cannot contact their MP office [via email] and expect a response in a reasonable length of time, if at all. My point here is not to ridicule the MPs themselves, or their offices, but rather point out the need for a more effective and interactive form of government. Our current form of government was built on the assumption that the general public did not have access to information on current events, or mechanisms to have their opinion communicated efficiently; with modern telecommunications technology, this is no longer the case. . .

What impact will this ignorance have on the forthcoming changes to Canadian copyright law? More from Brendan Wilson\'s site, with thanks to Politech.


Whatever happend to the Homepage?

Mark writes \"Adam Druckman, Detroit Metro Times: The personal home page was the Web\'s first rallying call for mass social change. \"On the Internet,\" the pundits claimed, \"everyone will be a publisher!\" What happened?
Full Story from\"

The authors says the old style \"look at me\" homepages have changed, now the big thing is Blogging (e.g.).

\"I miss the personal home pages of yore. Their clunky charm was the prototype for the Web\'s emerging power to communicate. And now that so many of them are gone (or turned into Web logs), I wish somebody had saved the original models, if only for history\'s sake.\"


Cookies for all of us

The NYTimes has a nice Story on the guy that invented \"cookies\", Lou Montulli. He was employee #9 at Netscape... Just imagine those stock options! He left Netscape in 1998, a millionaire many times over to create and they say he has since left that company as well.
It\'s a good story for a little piece of web history, and they also cover all the privacy troubles with cookies.

\"A recent survey by Public Opinion Strategies, a Republican polling organization, found that 67 percent of Americans identify online privacy as a big concern — far more than those who identify fighting crime (55 percent) or building an antimissile shield (22 percent).\"


The Web Can Shrink a Big World

at the New York Times
- A nice
synopsis in of internet search techniques, tools and
tips. With advice from librarian, Ms. Osofsky, from the

\"People think with the Internet, you push a button and
get an answer,\" says Marcia Osofsky, a librarian at the
New York Public Library telephone reference desk.\"

Full Story


Searchopolis Closes Up Shop

Searchopolis has gone the way of the dinosaur. On August 18, they closed up shop and posted the following message: \"As of August 18, 2001, will no longer offer educational resources, including filtered search. We apologize to those users who have enjoyed Searchopolis\' free services and thank you for your support. While N2H2 makes no recommendation regarding alternative sources for filtered search, a recent major children\'s software magazine gave the following filtered search engines high marks:\" Yahooligans and Ask Jeeves for Kids. no more.


Google May Go the Way of Pay for Fresher Web

It looks as though Google may decide to start charging site owners for fresh updates. According to the article at ZDNet UK, \"Google appears to be developing a service aimed at extracting revenue from online firms that want a fresher search of their Web sites, following in the footsteps of rivals AltaVista and Inktomi. more...



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