People Won\'t Pay For Content

The Guardian is running a Story on A report from Forrester Research that says rather than pay for something, users will simply switch to alternative, free services. There\'s a Press Release on, I couldn\'t seem to find the report, maybe someone else can.

\"Consumers access content when and where they need it, not when providers want to give it to them, and they won\'t pay for new media content since it doesn\'t eliminate their need for paid-for offline sources.\"


Bird\'s-Eye Views, Made to Order

Those who like GIS and mapping technology will want to read this
story from the New York Times. There is information about
satellite imaging and photography. Lots of links!
After the terrorist attacks \"...Space Imaging had taken the unusual
step of making images of the disaster sites available free on its Web
site, and some competitors had done likewise. \"We had so many
emergency groups calling that we decided to just put it out there so
they could use it as quickly as possible,\" said John Copple, chief
executive at Space Imaging, based in the Denver suburb of Thornton,

Full Story


Time for a Net obituary or a celebration?

Mefi pointed me to This Awesome little OP-ED piece from Roger

He sums up what\'s going on very well, I think. He says all
is well with the web, I just hope he\'s right.

\"The Internet Bubble has been compared to the Tulip
Craze, when 17th-century investors bid the price of Dutch
bulbs to insane heights. Both bubbles burst. The collapse of
the Internet economy was inevitable, and clears the way for
sane and reasonable rebuilding. Good news: There are more
tulips in the world than ever before


\"Literature in Context\'\' Web Resource Will Help Chicagoans Understand Book

A neat web site for learning about literary classics.
From the press release:
\"While Chicagoans are reading To Kill a Mockingbird next week
during the city\'s ``One Book One Chicago\'\' program, they\'ll have an
award-winning resource at their public libraries that helps them to
understand the historical and social context in which the book was
written in the 1950s. \"

See the FULL
to learn how to access the site.


The Effects of September 11 on Google

FirstMonday has an Interesting Story on Gooooogle and how they handled things on September, 11th.

They say this may have also changed how Google thinks of itself. This article examines how people used the Internet in general, and Google in particular, to seek and to deliver desperately wanted information about the lives lost and damage inflicted by the attacks.

See also Finding Disaster Coverage At Search Engines and Search Resources About Terrorist Attacks both from Search Engine Watch


PBS Announces American Field Guide-An Unprecedented Online Resource

PBS has created a great web site! This is a must see for
public reference staff. From the Press
\"The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and Oregon Public
Broadcasting (OPB) announce the launch of the AMERICAN FIELD
GUIDE Web site ( This unparalleled initiative draws on the rich video libraries of
local public television stations, bringing users searchable access to
more than 1,000 online video clips comprising 150 hours of outdoors
productions. This content -- available together for the first time ever
-- ranges from cliff-climbing in Maine to an intriguing look at the life
of wolves in Yellowstone. An extensive resource area for educators
complements the easy-to-use site.

Nearly 30 local public television stations collaborated to provide
captivating outdoor video content, representing all 50
states.\"(It does require Real Player.)


Writing for Search Engines

From Search Engine
comes this article about \"the subject of developing
content for a web site that maintains a good balance between
ranking well in the Search Engines and appeals to the intended
audience.\" This is a special report from the Search Engine
Strategies 2001 Conference, August 16-17, San Francisco CA.
Lots of
tips and links!

Full Story (scroll down the page a bit to the story)


At Age 30, E-Mail Matures to Adulthood

Reuters reports about e-mail, first invented in 1971. A lot of
good information and history about e-mail.

\"Thirty years on, e-mail has become a vital form of communication
whose usefulness was demonstrated in the during the devastating
attacks on New York and Washington last month. \"

Full Story


Cheating graduates a level

This Story from The Washington Times talks about how the age of the Internet has woven a host of new twists on the perennial problem of plagiarism. They say a 1998 poll of top U.S. high school students revealed that 80 percent had cheated — and 95 percent of those said they had escaped detection.

\"The only way to stop digital plagiarism,\" he says, \"is to create a centralized database of intellectual property that term papers can be checked against.\"


Salon Begins to Charge for News, Political Coverage

Reuters reports that will make you pay for
access to much of its content.
\" had started charging for some of its stories and
features on its sites, but now \"virtually all\" its news and politics
items -- two areas the publisher has gained prominence for --
will be for a fee. A one-year subscription costs $30. \"

Full Story



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