Internet

Wikipedia Is NOT A Doctor -- And A Study Confirms It

For the study, researchers identified the "10 costliest conditions in terms of public and private expenditure" -- which included diabetes, back pain, lung cancer and major depressive disorder -- and compared the content of Wikipedia articles about those conditions to peer-reviewed medical literature. Two randomly assigned investigators found that 90 percent of the articles contained false information, which could affect the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

Now for those of you who are saying that it's not the doctors themselves checking Wikipedia, you'd be wrong. According to a pair of studies from 2009 and 2010, "70% of junior physicians use Wikipedia in a given week, while nearly 50% to 70% of practicing physicians use it as an information source in providing medical care."
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Free to Forget

Europe's highest court recently ruled that EU citizens have the right to be forgotten—by Google's search engines. Bob talks with Emily Bell, Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, about the impact of this decision on freedom of information and internet privacy.



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Why the death of net neutrality would be a disaster for libraries

The Internet's eyes turned to the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday, as the panel approved a plan to consider allowing Internet service providers to charge Web sites like Netflix for higher-quality delivery of their content to consumers. In the lead-up to the vote, tech companies, venture capitalists and even celebrities all expressed opposition to the proposal, arguing that it would effectively end the open Internet.

But another group who cares deeply about this issue is the library community. The Switch spoke to Lynne Bradley, the director of government relations at the American Library Association's Washington office, about how net neutrality affects libraries, the people who rely on them and public institutions at large. This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2014/05/16/why-the-death-of-net-neutrality...

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Library Websites: Three Truths

Laura Solomon, a creator of library websites passes along what she believes to be the three major rules in creating a website for your library.

People primarily visit library websites for the following reasons:
Access to their account
Search the catalog
Phone number and address
Program information

But there are always other reasons.

Opting Out Is Nearly Impossible

http://time.com/83200/privacy-internet-big-data-opt-out/

The myth that users will “vote with their feet” is simply wrong if opting out comes at such a high price. With social, financial and even potentially legal repercussions involved, the barriers for exit are high. This leaves users and consumers with no real choice nor voice to express our concerns.

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to dominate the cloud. The winner or winners will have a lot of control over the Internet. Their choices affect issues like data privacy, and as virtual landlords, their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

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I Wish I Could Read Wikipedia Like This

http://blog.assaflavie.com/wikipedia/
"It often takes more than a few clicks to reach understanding. You dive down, deeper and deeper with each click, then navigate back up and continue reading. It's very easy to get lost and to lose your context. Don't get me wrong, I realize it's an encyclopedia and not a textbook, and every article can't possibly explain every sub-article it links to. Yet this level of normalization yields a terse, unfriendly tone, which can be frustrating if you're new to the subject and don't understand many of the terms used."

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Chicago Public Library Unveils its New Website

What do you think of the new website ? Here's the old one.

You can comment below or on their Help Us Improve Our Website page.

What You Think You Know About the Web Is Wrong

If you’re an average reader, I’ve got your attention for 15 seconds, so here goes: We are getting a lot wrong about the web these days. We confuse what people have clicked on for what they’ve read. We mistake sharing for reading. We race towards new trends like native advertising without fixing what was wrong with the old ones and make the same mistakes all over again.
http://time.com/12933/what-you-think-you-know-about-the-web-is-wrong/

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