Internet

Who sees the data you share on Facebook?

Facebook & your privacy
Who sees the data you share on the biggest social network?
To find out, we queried Facebook and interviewed some two dozen others, including security experts, privacy lawyers, app developers, and victims of security and privacy abuse. We dug into private, academic, and government research, as well as Facebook’s labyrinthian policies and controls. And we surveyed 2,002 online households, including 1,340 that are active on Facebook, for our annual State of the Net report. We then projected those data to estimate national totals.

Exercises in democracy: building a digital public library

Exercises in democracy: building a digital public library
Most neighborhoods in America have a public library. Now the biggest neighborhood in America, the Internet, wants a library of its own. Last week, Ars attended a conference held by the Digital Public Library of America, a nascent group of intellectuals hoping to put all of America's library holdings online. The DPLA is still in its infancy—there's no official staff, nor is there a finished website where you can access all the books they imagine will be accessible. But if the small handful of volunteers and directors have their way, you'll see all that by April 2013 at the latest.

Don't regulate the net - regulate your kids

Worried about online porn? Don't regulate the net – regulate your kids
"They don't need legislation; they don't need complicated filters that will be routed around in a flash (try a search on "VPN filter evade"); they just need to be part of the family. You can't turn off the internet, nor make its denizens respectable (ask Louise Mensch). You can, however, turn off the computer, or explain respectability to your child."

LinkedIn buying SlideShare

LinkedIn buying SlideShare
LinkedIn Corp. said Thursday that its first-quarter profit more than doubled, and the business networking company is buying presentation sharing website SlideShare for $118.8 million.

Zoetrope: Interacting with the Ephemeral Web

Zoetrope: Interacting with the Ephemeral Web
Dinis Cruz Found A Really Neat Video from 2008 he calls "probably one of the most amazing visualizations of data that I've ever seen. The toolkit that these guys have is out of this planet and it's crazy that this research project from Adobe seems to have been dropped (there are no other references to this project or technology since 2008) For me, when I see those animations of temp-data-over time (i.e. Ephemeral data), I think of code analysis over multiple data-sets (payloads) or user roles (i.e. authorization rules)"

Collusion Browser Plugin Shows You Who's Tracking You on the Web

Collusion Browser Plugin Shows You Who's Tracking You on the Web
Once installed, Collusion works much like its Firefox counterpart, except with better tracking detection and some UI changes Chrome users will appreciate. The map is completely empty. As you browse, you'll see the sites you visit start to appear on the map, and if they drop tracking cookies on your computer you'll see them in red. Hover over any of the circles on the map to read more about the site, and whether it's a known tracker. If you already have privacy extensions installed, you'll likely see fewer circles on your map. Either way, you'll probably see lots of interconnected circles

Be Very Afraid: The Cable-ization of Online Life Is Upon Us

Be Very Afraid: The Cable-ization of Online Life Is Upon Us

Imagine what’s possible from Comcast’s perspective: If you can slice and dice traffic, play definitional chess (“that’s not the internet, that’s a specialized service!”), and be the only game in town, you’ll get to replicate the cable model by making sure that every successful online application owes its success in part to you and pays you tribute.

Has the internet run out of ideas already?

Has the internet run out of ideas already?
We're now at the stage where we should be getting the next wave of disruptive surprises. But – guess what? – they're nowhere to be seen. Instead, we're getting an endless stream of incremental changes and me-tooism. If I see one more proposal for a photo-sharing or location-based web service, anything with "app" in it, or anything that invites me to "rate" something, I'll scream.

Are Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr Leading the Way in a Content Censorship Wave

Are Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr Leading the Way in a Content Censorship Wave?

Do image oriented and visual curation sites have unique responsibilities since photos can be used as very specific maps for how to achieve certain negative activities, such as self-mutilation? Does the discussion expand to other social sites such as Twitter and Facebook, where I can link to such a picture? What about the role of general content arbiter aka search engines? Should our ability to look for and connect with potentially objectionable content at all be controlled?

Inside Washington's high risk mission to beat web censors

Inside Washington's high risk mission to beat web censors
For more than a year, the intelligence services of various authoritarian regimes have shown an intense desire to know more about what goes on in an office building on L Street in Washington DC, six blocks away from the White House.

The office is the HQ of a US government-funded technology project aimed at undermining internet censorship in countries such as Iran and Syria. And so every week – sometimes every day – email inquiries arrive there that purport to be from pro-democracy activists in those places, but which, the recipients are confident, actually come from spies.

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