Internet

Pornography Takes the Next Seat in Public Places

The growing public display of pornographic content is a thorny issue for legislators, libraries and airlines.
Full article in the NYT
Edward Hopper, 11AM, 1926

3 Charts That Show How Wikipedia Is Running Out of Admins

We're now in the long run: the end of the first era of social media, Web 2.0's middle age. Among tech types, disruption tends to be the word. But what Wikipedia now requires is the careful, curatorial work of stewardship. We're about to see whether the web, so good at novelty, can also succeed at TLC.

Daniel Russell’s awesome Google search techniques

Daniel Russell’s awesome Google search techniques
There are plenty of Google search cheat sheets floating around. But it’s not often you get to hear advice directly from someone at Google who offers you his favorite search tools, methods and perspectives to help you find the impossible.

Here are some of my favorite tips shared by Russell at the 2012 Investigative Reporters and Editors conference. Some of these techniques are powerful but obscure; others are well-known but not fully understood by everyone.

Sweeping Effects as Broadband Moves to Meters

Story in the NYT has this tease line: Nicholas Longo, the director of Geekdom, says usage-based billing would worsen an economic barrier between some Americans and the Internet. "It's like locking the doors to the library."

Full article: Sweeping Effects as Broadband Moves to Meters

Googler proposes '451' error code to signal Internet censorship, in honor of Ray Bradbury

A 451 Internet error code? Digital Trends has the details:

"Government-imposed online censorship has become increasingly prevalent over the past few years...When censorship does happen, we need a sign that clearly tells us that that’s the reason for a site’s inaccessibility.

Enter Tim Bray, a software developer at Google who has proposed a solution: a “451? error code that displays anytime you visit a site blocked by the government. The number 451 is in honor of late author Ray Bradbury, whose science fiction classic Fahrenheit 451, first published in 1950, warned of a dystopian world defined by government-imposed censorship (in the form of burning any house that contains books)."

Nobody Wants A .library TLD

Reveal Day 13 June 2012 – New gTLD Applied-For Strings
ICANN developed the New generic Top-Level Domain Program to increase competition and choice by introducing new gTLDs into the Internet’s addressing system. What is a gTLD? It is an Internet domain name extension such as the familiar .com, .net, or .org. There are 280 ccTLDs but only 22 “generics” in the domain name system right now, but that is all about to change.

The new gTLD application window opened on 12 January 2012 and closed on 30 May 2012. The following list displays all of the gTLD strings that were applied for during this round.

How Twitter is putting an end to our private lives

Better Title:
How [People Are Using] Twitter [To] put an end to [Their Own] private lives

But is it really that clear? How do you know, for example, whether your own beliefs about privacy might go out of the window in the heat of an acrimonious split-up, or sexual boastfulness, or spurned humiliation? Say that you could swear on your life that you wouldn't spill the beans in public, no matter what.

Could you guarantee the same discretion on your partner's behalf?

[Thanks Derrick!]

Felicia Nimue Ackerman: If Internet poses dangers, how about books?

The News-Herald, a newspaper based in Lake County in Ohio between Cleveland and Ashtabula, carries an opinion piece by a philosophy professor at Brown University.

The lead to the piece provides an interesting set-up:

Do you know what your children are doing right now? Would it reassure you to think that they are curled up in the living room, with their noses in books?

It shouldn't. Books pose a major danger to children. Let me count the ways.

The Whole Library In His Hands

On "The Story" - American Public Media

Dick speaks with Brewster Kahle, who is collecting copies of all the books he can from around the world. Some are scanned and put online while others are in storage. His model is the Ancient Library of Alexandria and if someone wants to look at a copy of Euclid's Elements from centuries ago, all they have to do is search the database. You can also read at the Internet Archive a book that Dick’s grandfather wrote.

Download MP3 of the show

Page for the episode at "The Story" website.

With Social Media Every Old Complaint Is New Again

The Call of the Future
Now that telephones are virtually everywhere, observed The New York Times, “telephone manners are, quite naturally, becoming equally complicated.” The year was 1986 (when a few people had car phones but the mobile phone was not yet widely distributed). Strikingly, it could have been last week—or it could have been around 1900, when, the German critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin noted, the phone arrived in his Berlin household, with an “alarm signal that menaced not only my parents’ midday nap but the historical era that underwrote and enveloped this siesta.”

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